Juniata River Wading Access Options

N

NLansberry

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Howdy everyone,

I’m planning to fish the Juniata River this coming Friday. I have family coming in from out of state (mostly for family stuff, but getting to fish here is a bonus), so my time is at a premium.

I was wondering which access points give you the best bang for your buck so to speak in regards to being able to park at one place and cover lots of water on foot/spread out with another person or two. I’m sure every access has “wadeable spots” but I’m sure there are some with larger stretches than others. I’ve searched old threads for ideas, but figured this would be easier. I’m just trying to be as efficient as I can while I’m able to be out. Thanks!
 
Howdy everyone,

I’m planning to fish the Juniata River this coming Friday. I have family coming in from out of state (mostly for family stuff, but getting to fish here is a bonus), so my time is at a premium.

I was wondering which access points give you the best bang for your buck so to speak in regards to being able to park at one place and cover lots of water on foot/spread out with another person or two. I’m sure every access has “wadeable spots” but I’m sure there are some with larger stretches than others. I’ve searched old threads for ideas, but figured this would be easier. I’m just trying to be as efficient as I can while I’m able to be out. Thanks!
Can you give us an idea as to where you'll be regarding the Juniata? The river is over 100 miles long, so which sections will you be near?
 
The lower end of the system, so anywhere from about Mifflintown downstream to the Duncannon is where I was looking at going.
 
I'm only familiar down to about Thompsontown. I know this isn't what you wanted, but you can find great wading water at all of the accesses that include the June's Drive -In access (Arch Rock), Mifflin, Port Royal, or Thompsontown access. Take your pick.
 
The key is water levels. You want to keep an eye on the USGS map over on the right. . .

Check the Newport gage for the river. Ideally, it should be around 3.8' or lower for wading. It's at 3.54' today, which is about as low as it goes except for serious drought years. At this level, you can find good wading at most access points. The lower J has very good public access and the PFBC ramps at Thompsontown, Millerstown, Newport, and Amity Hall will be wadeable at this level.

Good luck with your trip.
 
If this person selected Amity Hall, I would like to hear a report.

My guess: The entire section has grass all the way to the surface making fishing impossible.
 
Just floated from Amity Hall down into the Susky. Eel grass (almost) all the way.
 
You know how we ***** about rhodo with trout fishing? Yeah, that's how I feel about the eel grass in the river. Stretches like that are maddening.
 
I fished around the Millerstown park/pool. The grass was really annoying, both subsurface and floating. I posted a stream report for my morning there in that section. Tough sledding.
 
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with low water and hot temps should we expect a bad grass year?
What I find is this, and mind you, this only pertains to the water on the Juniata I know well, the grass is horrible in the same stretches and sections every year. No idea why, but in some places it's awful, and in others there is a none. Same stretches, year after year, grassy and unfishable.
 
What I find is this, and mind you, this only pertains to the water on the Juniata I know well, the grass is horrible in the same stretches and sections every year. No idea why, but in some places it's awful, and in others there is a none. Same stretches, year after year, grassy and unfishable.
The slower stretches have more grass than the faster stretches, right?
 
What I find is this, and mind you, this only pertains to the water on the Juniata I know well, the grass is horrible in the same stretches and sections every year. No idea why, but in some places it's awful, and in others there is a none. Same stretches, year after year, grassy and unfishable.
I assume its many reasons, but the substate, flow and nitrogen effluent near by is tops on the list
 
I assume its many reasons, but the substate, flow and nitrogen effluent near by is tops on the list
Yeah relatively gentle current with a softer substrate is ideal for eelgrass. As much as a pain is it is for us, it is probably the most important aquatic plant in the Susquehanna watershed and the Bay. When I see big sections of it on the river I shake my fist, but am also really glad it’s there. We lost a lot of eelgrass on our rivers to past practices, and it’s great to see it so strong.
 
Yeah relatively gentle current with a softer substrate is ideal for eelgrass. As much as a pain is it is for us, it is probably the most important aquatic plant in the Susquehanna watershed and the Bay. When I see big sections of it on the river I shake my fist, but am also really glad it’s there. We lost a lot of eelgrass on our rivers to past practices, and it’s great to see it so strong.
I agree. It tends to grow in fine gravel and sandy substrates. Where there are larger rocks, eel grass usually doesn't grow.

I don't agree with slower current necessarily, though. It can hold on and grow in some swift current. It's most annoying in September through November when it starts to die and float downstream.
 
I agree. It tends to grow in fine gravel and sandy substrates. Where there are larger rocks, eel grass usually doesn't grow.

I don't agree with slower current necessarily, though. It can hold on and grow in some swift current. It's most annoying in September through November when it starts to die and float downstream.
slightly off topic. I'm glad the WW jam is in August. Fishing last year was bit** dodging the grass clumps
 
slightly off topic. I'm glad the WW jam is in August. Fishing last year was bit** dodging the grass clumps
Bass fishing is much better in October than August, though, but I agree. It's been in August or September every year except last year.
 
Yeah relatively gentle current with a softer substrate is ideal for eelgrass. As much as a pain is it is for us, it is probably the most important aquatic plant in the Susquehanna watershed and the Bay. When I see big sections of it on the river I shake my fist, but am also really glad it’s there. We lost a lot of eelgrass on our rivers to past practices, and it’s great to see it so strong.

Has anyone identified this grass (genus and species)?

I Googled "eelgrass" and most of the references are to a saltwater plant.
 
I believe it may be this. But I’m not certain.

5. Wild Celery​

Similar in appearance to eelgrass, the long, ribbon-like leaves of wild celery can be distinguished by the light green stripe running down the center of each leaf. Wild celery grows in fresh and slightly salty waters throughout the region, including the upper Chesapeake Bay and its tidal and non-tidal tributaries.

Wild celery can withstand disturbance from waves and is more tolerant of murky, pollutant-rich waters than other underwater grasses. Many underwater grasses serve as an important food source for critters, but wild celery’s buds and roots are particularly important to waterfowl as they migrate and overwinter in the Bay region.

In fact, the scientific name for the canvasback, Aythya valisineria, comes from the first part of wild celery’s scientific name, Vallisneria americana.
1720977736311
 
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