FULLING MILL RAZOR SCISSORS...any good?

I have lots of scissors by different makers. One thing you should do regardless of brand is to make sure you don't try to make one pair do it all.

Bigger scissors for thicker or heavier materials and fine tipped scissors for thread & fibers.

And wire cutters for wire... ;)

Another thing I do is to protect the tips of my scissors when not in use by covering them with a short length of vinyl tubing of the appropriate diameter.

Take care of them and they will last a long time and continue to perform.
 
Recent scroll thru FM site.
Saw

FULLING MILL RAZOR SCISSORS....$35​

I have a good impression w FM, but know that the "quality profile" of each product can vary.
Any experience here, pls?

These look exactly like the same scissors that are rebranded by a variety of companies. Would not buy them at that price. You should be able to find the same for about half that price elsewhere. jus tgoogle 4" fly tying razor scissor and you should see plenty of options.
 
I have lots of scissors by different makers. One thing you should do regardless of brand is to make sure you don't try to make one pair do it all.

Bigger scissors for thicker or heavier materials and fine tipped scissors for thread & fibers.

And wire cutters for wire... ;)

Another thing I do is to protect the tips of my scissors when not in use by covering them with a short length of vinyl tubing of the appropriate diameter.

Take care of them and they will last a long time and continue to perform.
Good advice. I use a small pair of Anvil's for most of my thread and natural materials but have several pairs of Fiskars for cutting synthetics and heavier stuff. I love the Fiskars and would use then for everything but they are just a little bit too big for me to use as my main scissors. I even keep a pair of the fiskers in my vest for on stream use.
20240215 043937
 
I’ve never met scissors that didn’t cut. Back in the day good scissors were a bit rare. Nowadays, even the cheap ones are plenty sharp enough for fly tying needs. I don’t baby scissors and use them to cut anything and everything without issues. Just my 2 cents.
 
I’ve never met scissors that didn’t cut. Back in the day good scissors were a bit rare. Nowadays, even the cheap ones are plenty sharp enough for fly tying needs. I don’t baby scissors and use them to cut anything and everything without issues. Just my 2 cents.
I agree with you for the most part that it would be hard to find a pair of scissors that didn't cut out of the box, however I have tossed plenty of cheap scissors that dulled after a short time.

I tend to be a buy once cry once kind of guy.
 
Best advice is use 2 pair one for fine and one for course materials/wire/sinthetics.
 
Best advice is use 2 pair one for fine and one for course materials/wire/sinthetics.

You can buy a small 3" pair of diagonal cutters for under $5.00 all day long...

Why screw up a nice pair a scissors to cut wire? :unsure:
 
Most times I’m breaking wire not cutting it. When I do cut it I use the back of the jaws not the tips. I get years of use and abuse from cheap scissors.

I tend to be a buy once cry once kind of guy.
I’m a save it and don’t cry at all over money kind of guy.
 
I have a pair of these, they're pretty dang sharp. Just wish the points were a bit more fine. Good scissor.
 
If you haven’t, give the “spring assist scissors” from Risen Fly Fishing a try. Only $12 and they let you do the fine work very easily. I like that you only have to squeeze them to make them work, as opposed to opening and then closing them. I’ve made a tool caddy out of wood with drilled holes, and I also like that they stay where you put them under spring tension when not in use. Some of my other scissors tend to flop out of their holes because the holes aren’t deep enough. I even like the light blue color that Risen uses on their tools. Tends to make ‘em stand out. I like them so much that I actually bought a spare.
 
Scissors are the most important toll for flyting. I can use a pair of vise grips to hold the fly, but having scissors that do not cut is a real problem. When I starting tying commercially I was told to keep efficiently you have to keep the scissors in your hand. When I first tried it I thought they were crazy. How can you tie with those things in your hand. Currently I do not feel right without them. It is important that they fit your hand. My fingers are short but large in diameter. So It is hard for me to use most types. As far as using different pairs that is a waist of time and time is money. Use the rear section of them to cut synthetics wire and so on, Use the tips to cut hackle and other materials that need to be very precise. When buying them take a cotton ball and make one cut. See how many fibers are not cut. That should be very minimal. I learned this from a seminar Orvis put on many years ago. If and when they get dull throw them away and get a new pair. Usually spending a little more will get you a longer last scissor.
 
Anyone who's ever soldered component leads and <18 AWG wire can say flush-cutters work best on fine trimming of small wire. Amazon has a few for $5-$10. Radio Shack used to sell them before closing all their stores.
 
Anyone who's ever soldered component leads and <18 AWG wire can say flush-cutters work best on fine trimming of small wire. Amazon has a few for $5-$10. Radio Shack used to sell them before closing all their stores.

Xuron makes excellent flush cutters in the USA.

I have an old set of made in USA Craftsman diagonal cutters that suffice for me as cutting wire flush has never been a task I needed to do when tying with wire. I especially like them and the matching long nose pliers because they are small and easily fit in the Plano box i used as my tool storage and transport box.

...When I starting tying commercially I was told to keep efficiently you have to keep the scissors in your hand. When I first tried it I thought they were crazy. How can you tie with those things in your hand. Currently I do not feel right without them. It is important that they fit your hand....

I own more than a few pair of scissors from Dr. Slick & some other no-name Pakistani jobs to Renomed and Anvil. The most comfortable pair I've found to hold in my wide hand with my fat fingers are the Anvil Midge Scissors.
 
This thread really took me down a rabbit hole. I had been using some Dr. Slick scissors with nice big loops but at that point I wasn't holding them in my hand while I was tying. Eventually I began forcing myself to keep them in-hand for the duration of the fly. Somewhere around that time, I saw that Kopter scissors were on sale somewhere so I bought a pair. They are nice, fine tips, serrated, sharp. What I didn't consider is that the loops were too small for my digits, ergo I can't retain them in-hand while I tie. I searched to find a Kopter website for other options and stumbled upon Premax scissors made in Premana, Italy. Their embroidery RingLock offerings appear to be the same as Kopter. Investigating Premax led me to a Reddit thread where I discovered The French Needle, which has some interesting scissors for sale and also a variety of silk threads that could be used for tying purposes. I really like Anvil but I think I'm going to check out Renomed next.
 
Last edited:
... I really like Anvil but I think I'm going to check our Renomed next.

Renomed are VERY nice but definitely not the easiest or best "keep in MY hand" scissors I own because a lot of them are longer.

That being said, I usually have three pair of scissors in play while tying. A pair of Anvils in my hand and on my desk, a bigger 4.5" pair of Dr. Slicks for coarse work and a pair of Renomed Super Stingers when I need to get into a tight spot.

I also do my share of thread snapping on hooks over size 20 so on some flies the only time I use scissors is after tying off the head. ;)
 
Last edited:
Back
Top