Getting Started

Spring Nymphing in Pennsylvania Webinar on February 8th, 2022

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The spring kicks off the fly fishing season. Aquatic insects start making their move with warmer waters and anticipation of their emergence out of the water. Trout are equally actively feeding on nymphs for the vast majority of their diet.

In this webinar, Dave Rothrock and Dave Kile will have a conversation about some technics and approaches to spring nymphing. Dave Rothrock will discuss How to Set Up a Drop Shot Nymph Rig to get the best results as well as plenty of other ideas.

So join Dave and Dave for a fun and casual conversation about Spring Nymphing in Pennsylvania.

Topics
• How to Set Up a Drop Shot Nymph Rig
• Seasonal hatches and trout food
• Types of nymph patterns
• Wild vs stocked trout behavior
• Your questions and answers

Dave Rothrock
Dave has been fly-fishing across Pennsylvania for over 50 years. He is an accomplished angler and casting...

Dressing for Cold Weather Fly Fishing

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4279531493 f1007e7064 z While winter fly fishing, I have rarely said I overdressed for a day outside. More often I wished I had been better prepared. I was fishing Muddy Creek a few winters back for the better part of the day trip with Maurice on one of our all-day Lewis and Clark expeditions. The mild pleasant morning changed over to a pretty cool cloudy day. I failed to have some proper thick wool socks and it made for some pretty cold feet after a few hours in the stream. Sadly, I knew better and told myself I would let that happen again.

Temperature, sun and wind can make huge variables when gearing for some winter fly fishing. Standing in 45-degree water can set you back pretty quickly too. You've heard it before, but I'll offer it again: layers, layers, and more layers. The most important way to keep yourself prepared is with the proper layers.

Headwear
I like wearing a ball cap for fishing...

A Knotty Approach to Time on the Water

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By Maurice
While sharing some time on the water the other day with Dave Kile (dkile) I experienced what seems to happen often during a decent hatch with some wind, you guessed it, a wind knot! Or as Lefty Kreh calls them, bad casting knots. Everyone gets them now and then, especially when combining a breeze, long leaders and fine tippets. Or for the chuck and duck crowd, of which I am often a member, weight and multiple flies. So as Dave stands upstream pondering my delay to cast to a rising fish, he asks, what’s the problem Einstein? I said I have a wind knot, and it reminded me of a tip I learned many years ago.

Back in the 80’s we were on a bus trip to the Breeches from the ‘burg and there was a video on the tube for those not taking the time to sleep. Being full of interest in sponging any and all info I could at the time, one tip in the video stuck with me. Terminal knot tying efficiency....

Summer Warm Water Fly Fishing Tactics

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Are you looking to continue fly fishing even as the summer heats up? Then join Dave Weaver and Dave Kile as they take a look at warm water fishing tactics and techniques for the Pennsylvania region.

Topics
Why small warm water creeks are overlooked
Species, with emphasis on sunfish, rock bass and smallmouth bass
Scouting & public access
Safety issues/clothing
Flies and tactics

Dave Weaver
Is a history teacher in Gettysburg Pennsylvania and a moderator at Paflyfish. He is an award-winning artist specializing in fly fishing-related topics. Dave has been fly fishing small streams in Pennsylvania for over forty years. A special thanks to Dave Weaver for putting this together. Please follow him on Instagram here : https://www.instagram.com/dave_wgettysburg/

Dave Kile
Is the founder of Paflyfish, an online community of fly fishing anglers in the Pennsylvania region founded in 1995.

Fly Fishing Getting Started - Stoneflies

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One of the first signs of spring is the emergence of the little black stonefly in many streams in the East. A variety of stoneflies (Order Plecoptera) in different sizes and colors follow suit throughout the season. Stoneflies are often overlooked by many Eastern anglers as mayflies and caddis are much more prolific. They rarely show up in any great numbers and their timing is not very predictable. Still, it is an important insect to understand for both nymphing and dry fly fishing.

In the Western states, stoneflies are held in high esteem as anglers anxiously anticipate them for their large numbers and size (Video). Generally, stoneflies are the largest of all insects that live in the water.

Like many insects, stoneflies have a successful lifecycle that dates back over 250 million years to the Permian Period and not much...

Fly Fishing Getting Started - Trout Food Overview

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There are thousands of streams across the region where wild trout naturally reproduce as a result of ideal water conditions and the availability of food. With countless years of evolution behind them, trout have successfully learned to eat a wide variety of food sources. Even then for the trout, everything from geology to pollution influences what kind of trout food prevails in each stream. Stocked trout are no exception to this and within days when they are placed into streams instincts quickly kick in for them to key in on naturally occurring trout food.

These different types of trout foods may not only be specific to a stream, but seasonal as well. Trout are limited to what is presented to them much like many animals in the wild. Typically spring and summer offer a great abundance of food choices. Winter may only provide limited food supplies. Trout adapt to the cold water by...

Mayfly Sex Identification: Male or Female

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Coffinflies

Rolling thru my mayfly photos I was able to take many pictures at one of the Spring Jams two years ago. I wanted to demonstrate the differences between spinner (imago) male and female. These two coffin flies (Ephemera guttulata ) attached show these differences.

Male (left photo)
Long forelegs
Rear claspers or forceps at the rear of the body
Eyes on a male tend to be larger and more bulbus

Female (right photo)
Short fore wing
Forceps do not exist
Smaller flatter eyes

Try Some Winter Fly Fishing

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Winter Fly Fishing - what do I do?

With colder weather, many give up on angling, but with the fall clean-up finished it can be a good time to explore new fly fishing opportunities. December is the time to get a new fishing license and break out a map.

Where
No secrets, but there are plenty of streams across the region that are open year-round that are often stocked in the fall or have naturally reproducing trout. Some really good opportunities can be found in the limestone spring feed streams too. They generally hold good water temperatures and some of the more challenging fly fishing opportunities. Take a little time and do some research for something new there are plenty of places to explore here in the forums!

When
Any day works as compared to moving your old soccer trophies in the...

Where Can I Fly Fish?

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14991181567 9e46a8a2af o Where Can I Fly Fish? This is one of the more popular questions asked on Paflyfish. Truthfully the answer is bigger than the question and one worth exploring. There are hundreds of fantastic streams for all types of anglers in the region. A little homework will yield you your own personal hot spots.

The spectrum of opportunities is pretty remarkable. Generally, you can find streams across the state stocked with millions of trout every year by the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC). There are hundreds of miles of fragile backwoods waterways with native wild brook trout. There are magnificent-looking streams teaming with natural reproducing brown trout. To add to the opportunity, the region is blessed with a mix of freestone and limestone streams with a wide variety of aquatic life that trout thrive on. Every part of the state has its own unique waterways.

To...

Getting Out For Fall Fly Fishing

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Fall fly fishing in the region offers plenty of great opportunities. The cooler weather offers anglers some solitude of fly fishing while many are caught up with other fall activities. A little bit of preparation can be a rewarding opportunity for those who can make the time.

Reproduction plays an important part of the trout lifecycle during the fall months for both brook and brown trout. Brook trout, native to the US, usually begin to spawn from late September through October. Brown trout typically start spawning in October through late November. I have seen this go later too.

During the spawn coloring on the trout will intensify especially in the males. Females will often create gravel beds for the fertilized eggs called redds. It is very important to be careful of these sections on streams when you see redds and not to kick them up when walking. Probably best...
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