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Fly of the Month: Olive Woolly Bugger

Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 10/06/2016 (3065 reads)
Fly of the Month: Olive Woolly Bugger
by Tightline Productions

Tightline Productions has done a real nice video giving a step by step for Olive Woolly Bugger. This is one of my favorite flies to use almost year round. In the spring when there is no hatch or in the summer going for bass, I just love tossing this woolly bugger for some action. Enjoy.

Olive Woolly Bugger from Tightline Productions on Vimeo.

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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 02/11/2016 (7012 reads)
By Gaeron Friedrichs (gaeronf)

stoneflyAs we all know, winter is here. To me, it sure doesn’t feel like it. There’s no snow at all. But since its winter, it’s time to go to the winter flies. When someone says winter flies, I typically think big stoneflies, or little midges. Here I’m going to show you a pattern I developed. The Goldilocks Stonefly is a golden stonefly representation. Keep in mind, this isn’t just a winter fly, it can be used year round, but it is a super effective fly in the winter. It incorporates some great realistic and attractive aspects. For example, the use of rubber legs and Australian Possum give the fly superior movement. Typically you want stones to be super heavy. I use a tungsten bead on this fly, along with a great deal of lead (or lead free) wire. This is due to the fact that the abdomen, legs, and thorax is all natural material. As some of you may or may not know some natural furs, like hare’s ear and possum, will decrease the sink rate of a fly. That’s why we balance the fly out with the extreme weighting. Like I said before, the rubber legs (used for tails and antennae) will give the fly great movement, and the fly will breathe great with all the natural materials. The back will give the fly a little contrast and flash, and the thick rib gives a distinct ribbing. The hook I love to use is a Skalka Streamer hook. This hook is super strong, and has a ridiculous point. So first, let’s look at the exact recipe:

Goldilocks Stone
Hook-Skalka Streamer Hook size 6
Bead-Matching Gold Tungsten Bead
Additional Weight-A large portion of lead wraps. Used here is .025. Be as liberal or as stingy as you wish
Thread-Golden Stonefly colored Danville’s Flat Waxed Nylon
Tails and Antennae-Gold or yellow rubber legs. Round or square doesn’t matter. Barring optional.
Rib-Brown, Copper, or Amber colored MEDIUM UTC wire
Abdomen-Australian Possum/Icelandic Sheep Golden Stone Blend
Abdomen Cover-1 strand of wide Mylar tinsel
Thorax- Australian Possum/Icelandic Sheep Golden Stone Blend
Thorax Cover-2 strands of wide Mylar tinsel
Additional Materials-Brown and Black Sharpie

Read detailed instructions here.
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 01/12/2016 (2065 reads)
The Paflyfish Eastern Fly Tying Jamboree is a fun day to get out doing some fly tying with members from the site. Attendees will be able to share in the day tying some of the their favorite flies and also learn from others.

scud" Everyone is invited to attend and watch the demonstrations, get tips from the tyers, and have a great time. We particularly encourage beginner tyers to attend, and we'll have beginner instruction set up at a table.

All skill levels are encouraged to attend.

Date: Saturday, February 6, 2016
Time: 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Location: Lehigh Gap Nature Center in Slatington, Pennsylvania

We hope to cover many categories including:
- Catskill style dries
- parachute style dries
- comparadun and hairwing style dries
- emergers
- imitative nymphs
- attractor nymphs
- terrestrials
- wet flies
- streamers

Things for you to bring:
All Tools and materials to tie your chosen demo fly. A tying lamp and any extension cords you need – there are an ample number of outlets on the walls behind the tying tables.
Bring any food or drinks you'd like to, but save room for dinner! We'll provide spring water on ice.
It's a good idea to get there and set up your tying gear before 10AM. We'll have access to the hall at the LGNC at 9AM, so please be ready to start tying at 10AM.

We'll also be holding a raffle at 5 PM of donated tying materials and fly fishing gear. Any donations to this raffle are welcome, and 100% of the proceeds will be donated to the Lehigh Gap Nature Center, as a "thank you" for allowing us to use their beautiful facility for this event.

We'll be heading over to Riverwalck's Saloon after the event for drinks and dinner. Directions to Riverwalck's Saloon can be found here:

Looking forward to a fun and educational day, meeting new PAFF members, and seeing old friends and fishing buddies!

Please sign up in the forum here.

A special thanks to GenCon, Heritage-Angler and Mooney4 who are putting this event together.

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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 12/31/2015 (7404 reads)
By David Weaver

Scuds, or freshwater shrimp, are a staple in the diet of trout. Here in Pennsylvania, they’re associated mainly with limestone streams but in my experience they are widespread in many waters although they are indeed especially numerous in the famous limestoners.

Here in the Cumberland Valley I use scud flies year round and rely on them greatly during the colder months of the year.

Many scud flies, in my opinion, are tied too bulky and stubby.

If you look at scuds, take the time to observe them while they’re actually in the water: they tend to be rather elongated, usually dark olive in color, and they are strong swimmers in short bursts, moving several inches with a strong wiggle motion. Upon coming to rest, they return to the curled shape.

scud"Cress bugs or “sow bugs” by contrast, aren’t swimmers and dead drift when dislodged. Many tiers prefer their scuds heavily weighted by I prefer them un-weighted. This seems to work well for me when sight nymphing.

When you see a trout rooting in weeds – a common sight on weedy limestoners – they’re usually in pretty shallow water or up high against weed beds. An un-weighted scud can be cast ahead of the fish and won’t plunge down in the weeds and snag. Remember, when flushed out from weeds and cover, scuds will dart. As your un-weighted scud drifts toward the trout, give it a twitch and watch that trout!

Anyway, this is a pretty easy fly to tie. Experiment with variations and see what works for you. I like a fairly long tail as scud’s legs stream back pretty far and the long, soft tail helps mimic the scud’s swimming action. On smaller versions, I’ll usually omit the legs at the front. Again, keep the fly fairly slender and dark.

If you’re hankering to do some winter trout fishing on limestone streams, fish these guys with confidence.

Here’s how to tie it:

Hook: #12 down to #20, scud shape or regular nymph hook; olive thread

Build a thread body on the shank and tie in a tuft of marabou tips (can substitute hackle or mallard flank) at the eye and a larger tuft at the bend to function as a tail.

Tie in about 2” of black, medium size Ultra Wire at the bend to function as ribbing; then tie about an inch of olive rubber material designed as “scud back” or some similar translucent latex.

Wrap in a body of mixed olive dubbing with some rabbit guard hair dubbing. Note that scuds tend to be a bit thicker toward the head.

Pull the latex over the top of the fur body, tie it off, and then wrap the wire over this to create the segmented blood veins. When done, pick out some of the body fur, especially toward the eye of the hook.
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 11/24/2015 (1225 reads)
Our friends over at Tightline Productions offer up a video instructions on tying Son of Sexy Walt's fly fishing opportunities. I'm a big fan of the Walt's Worm on Spring Creek in Center county and other spring feed streams Looks like a fun fly to try this winter.

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Published by David Weaver [Fishidiot] on 09/01/2015 (2329 reads)
In a recent stream report I indicated using a "stonecat" fly. For many PA FFers, this is an unusual pattern and not typically associated with trout fishing. Local river folks who fish bait for smallies, however, are very familiar with this critter.

The term "stonecat" is actually a misnomer and refers to a madtom found in western PA. The fish we have in the Susky/Potomac watershed is actually the marginated madtom. However, local folks have always called marginated madtoms "stonecats." Afishinado will tell you that locals in his home stomping grounds around Wilkes Barre call 'em "catties." They're a popular live bait.


Marginated madtoms are a shy, mysterious, largely nocturnal little catfish and many river anglers have never seen one. Bait fishermen often get them by seining weedy riffle areas at night or carefully feeling for them under rocks with their hands. Bass eat 'em like candy and, in my opinion, really key on the image of a stonecat. I love 'em, and stonecat flies are go-to patterns for summer bass for me, especially in clear water.

The fly I was using is one of a series of flies I've designed utilizing paint and craft felt. Like many of my personal patterns, it is realistic and detailed.

A much easier stonecat pattern would be tan or light brown sculpin wool for the head, a tan fur or chenille body, and a long tail of tan marabou. Tie a dumbbell weight Clouser style under the head so the fly swims hook upward and trim the head flat. Rubber band whiskers add a nice touch. The key, however, is to keep the fly very slender and very long.

Marginated madtoms are usually 2-5" in length and have a paddle like tail with a black edge; body is usually pinkish yellow on the ventral, light brown on the flanks, and olive over the back. You want a fly that swims with lots of motion and gets deep. I tie medium and very heavy versions.

The image above is an illustration I did of marginated madtoms based on a group of specimens I caught in central PA. Note the slender body, rounded tail that blends into the body like an eel, yellow fins, and square head with short whiskers.

You can follow the comments in the forum here on Stonecats.
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 01/13/2015 (1318 reads)
Tightline Productions has been offer up a host of great videos over the years. Recently they added offer up video instructions on tying . You can check out their Vimeo Channel here.

Hi-Vis Coachman from Tightline Productions on Vimeo.

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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 12/22/2014 (1138 reads)
christmas tree flyI was catching up on some of the recent threads in the Paflyfish Fly Tying Forum and found a post from Night_Stalker about a Christmas Tree Fly. Digging a little deeper into the post I checked out the post originating from Louis Cahill at Gink and Gasoline. Louis is an advertising photographer and along with Kent Klewein share their fly fishing stories on Gink and Gasoline. I have enjoyed many of their blog posts, but had missed this one from a couple years ago.

Well Loius served up a little holiday fly tying wonderment with his post a couple years ago and should you should check out his Christmas Tree Fly post and the Gink and Gasoline blog.

Happy Holidays,

From Paflyfish!

images with permission from Louis Cahill
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 08/15/2013 (2196 reads)
Our friends over at from Tightline Productions offer up a video instructions on tying up a Black Foam Beetle for summer fly fishing opportunities.

Foam Beetle from Tightline Productions on Vimeo.

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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 07/07/2013 (5240 reads)
By Dean Myers

It is the middle of summer, the grass is tall along the creek and there is a hatch coming off. Well, it isn’t your normal mayfly hatch that you need a 5 weight or less to fish and need a delicate presentation. It is time to fish the hopper hatches along the creek banks. Fishing with a grass hopper pattern can be a lot of fun. You don’t have to be nice and gentle and you can use it to fish for a lot of different species. If your trout waters are too warm, by all means, hit some warm water streams for bass and pan fish with a hopper. A lot of different species enjoy the tasty meal of a hopper. The other thing hopper patterns are great for is being used in a hopper-dropper rig. By all means, drop off the hook bend a second fly.

hopper Here is a pattern that I have tied for this year. A lot of people have been tying hopper patterns with foam. They are easy and they float well. Here is another option that I decided to try. The company that created the ThingAmaBobber has a new product that I really like. It is called the ThingAmaBody. It is an extremely easy product to use, looks great and floats forever. Another great thing about this product is you can make it whatever color you need it to be. It takes markers really well. So you can get really creative with how you want it to look.

When tying your hopper pattern you want to try and match the naturals. If you look at grass hoppers, it is important to see that the underside color is not always the same as the side and top color. When you are looking down on a grass hopper, remember that this is not how the fish will see it. They will be seeing the profile and color of the underside of it. Of the proportions, the head is usually about 1/3 of the body size.

Read detailed instructions here
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