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Fly Fishing Tips  Fly Fishing Tips
The Evolution of a Vest Fisherman

Published by Maurice Chioda [Maurice] on 2013/9/13 (3349 reads)
Ahhhhh the evolution of a vest fisherman.
by Maurice


Evolution of a Vest Fisherman


Stage One: get vest fill with unmentionables over time until its so heavy your back hurts at the end of a fishing day.

Stage Two: Decide to get a pack...smaller, holds less, straps to back rather than hanging on shoulders. no more back pain.

Stage Three: realize pack is too small and holds too little so get a bigger pack, still just a front pack but larger. You become front heavy and tip over easy......

Stage Four: Find a BETTER pack that has a backpack on it. Now you can carry a raincoat, water bottles, TP, everything you would ever need until you realize now you are carrying more than you did with a vest and your back hurts again. But less than if it were all in a vest.

Recommendation: The beauty of Chest packs/rucksacks is that they have a deep yoke around your neck, (don't pull on your neck like a vest) and most importantly they strap snuggly to your pectoral area (chest) to take the weight off of your shoulders where a vest focuses it on your shoulders.






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Published by Maurice Chioda [Maurice] on 2012/2/28 (2660 reads)
flyfishing knots

While sharing some time on the water the other day with Dave Kile (dkile) I experienced what seems to happen often during a decent hatch with some wind, you guessed it, a wind knot! Or as Lefty Kreh calls them, bad casting knots. Everyone gets them now and then especially when combining a breeze, long leaders and fine tippets. Or for the chuck and duck crowd, of which I am often a member, weight and multiple flies. So as Dave stands upstream pondering my delay to cast to a rising fish, he asks, what’s the problem Einstein? I said I have a wind knot, and it reminded me of a tip I learned many years ago.

Back in the 80’s we were on a bus trip to the Breeches from the ‘burg and there was a video on the tube for those not taking the time to sleep. Being full of interest in sponging any and all info I could at the time, one tip in the video stuck with me. Terminal knot tying efficiency. Think about it, every time we tie on a new piece of tippet, a new fly, etc., we are out of the game. It stands to reason that the faster you can tie on a fly (improved clinch knot in my case) or a new piece of tippet (double surgeons knot), the quicker you can begin flogging the water again.

The video stressed the need to get your knots down to 15 seconds each. Practice, practice, practice until you can meet that goal. This will put your fly change or tippet adjustments into under one minute if you include the spooling off tippet, picking out a new and returning the old flies. If you find yourself taking 5-10 minutes each to accomplish that task, you could likely be wasting an hour or more tying frustrating knots. Practicing on stream is KNOT efficient! (pun intended)Now it’s not a race, and I don’t suggest it to be. But it is practical to be as efficient as possible when enjoying your streamside time. Plus, when a hatch is on, the fish and bugs don’t wait until you re-tie, it goes on as scheduled, often it seems to go faster as the trouts plop, plop, plop all around you.

So do yourself a favor by following these few tips;
• Get your knots down to 15 seconds or so.
• Accept the fact your eyes are going bad and get some readers if seeing the eye is getting harder every year.
• Keep your tippet handy, I keep mine outside near my left hip where I can reach it easily.
• Keep your flys handy with few boxes so searching is not too long.
• Know your limitations and adapt.

Click to see original Image in a new windowThat last one may seem out of place for a seasoned fly fisher but this efficiency exercise also applies to damage control. That's right, when you booger up your line with a collapsed cast, loose loop or wind knot, bring your line in gently and assess the damage immediately. It can be tempting to just begin pulling and tugging but try to resist. Take a few seconds and loosely pull on some of the loops to see what you are dealing with. Look for loops that exit the knot and pull them back through. Often its only one or two loops that cause the whole mess. If it looks too complicated to unravel it probably is. Clip off the fly, this often makes it a much easier task because you can slip the tippet through the knot. Remember it only takes you 15 seconds to tie it back on. Just be sure when you clip it off you put it somewhere you remember like a fly patch, or other handy outside vest place. Don’t keep it in your hands or put it in your mouth. Trust me, this never ends well…soon you are chasing it down stream with your net or trying to get it out of your lip.

Lastly, If it's a total mess clip it ALL off and start over, in one minute or so you will be casting again.

Now I consider myself a pretty good untangler…in fact, my slogan is “Fly fishing is the art of tangling and untangling lines of different diameters while trying to enjoy yourself”. But it doesn’t have to be yours.






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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 2011/7/13 (2642 reads)
After a busy spring and early summer of fly-fishing, now is a good time to give your gear a little attention. Your fly line is especially could use some love during the season.

The UV rays of the sun and common chemicals can break down your fly line over time. Sunscreen and the deet in your insect repellent can easily do the most common damage. After a short time even Mud, salt and dirty water can weaken the effectiveness of you line unless you periodically clean and treat them carefully.

The team over at Rio Products has put together a couple of quick videos sharing some ways you can best keep your fly lines clean.


Cleaning A Fly Line - Part 1 from Sol Duc Buck on Vimeo.



Part 2 coming shortly shortly.
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 2010/4/13 (3170 reads)
Wild Trout Streams are a secret treasure for many fly fisherman in Pennsylvania. Many anglers hold a certain reverence for the quiet and often secluded opportunity they provide. With over 500 wild trout streams and well over 1,000 miles of water these hidden gems are a different kind of stream for fly-fishing. Some of these streams are unnamed or are tributaries of lesser waters. Rarely mentioned by name or found on many maps, this intimate experience also comes with greater stewardship and responsibility for those that take on these waters.

wild trout streamThe fly fishing experience in these backwoods areas are often regarded as one of self reliance and stealth. These small streams can provide a surprising opportunity to explore and uncover trout in a more wilderness environment. Much of the experience is not only finding these streams, but then learning the secrets of what makes these wild trout so illusive.

The Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC) defines Class A Wild Trout Streams as: "Streams that support a population of naturally produced trout of sufficient size and abundance to support a long‐term and rewarding sport fishery." The PFBC’s manages these stream sections for the the growth of the wild trout fishery with natural reproduction and no stocking. These streams can hold brook trout, brown trout or both species.

The PFBC is considering changes to its list of Class A Wild Trout Streams. At the next Commission meeting on April 19 and 20, 2010, the Commission will consider changes to its list of wild trout streams. Specifically, the Commission will consider the addition of over 80 new streams or changes to current watts of streams to the list.

So if you want to get a little wild try something new, it may be in your backyard.
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Published by Dave Kile [davekile] on 2009/12/30 (4896 reads)
flyboxesWell after almost 30 years of fly-fishing I have assembled quite a sundry of storage boxes for my flies, nymphs and streamers. Not that any of these boxes are special. Just a real eclectic set of Plano, Orvis, Perrine and Tupperware containers. I have Adams stuck with Sulphurs, midges with my little BWO’s and Caddis flies with my nymphs. Imagine a house with about seventeen additions of all different shapes and sizes bolted on.

How I got to this point is anybodies guess. Probably it has been based on my early experiences and knowledge with certain flies. As I learned more I just added it in to what room I had and seemed logical at the time. What I don’t get is how I caught just as many fish being a numnuts with a small limited arsenal of flies compared to my expansive cache today.

shamwowguyAll these boxes have served me well and actually I still have my first fly box that my friend Ron gave me the first year I started fly fishing. He set me up with a great selection of starter flies. I guess he felt I was worthy enough not to lose the darn box on the stream. I think my hope over the years has been that the ShamWow Infomercial Guy would show up on the TV early one Sunday morning with some sort Super Fly Life Organizer Box for $19.95 that included a special offer of two for the price of one and my life would be twice as good going forward. No such luck.

Still waiting, I moved on and purchased a new chest pack that has started me down this unintended, but well needed holistic journey. It’s like when you buy a new car you have to clean the garage out to make the new ride fit it inside.

The new chest pack won’t fit all my stupid boxes so I need to get organized. I knew this was going to happen, just like I can anticipate what’s going happen every time I go to the dentist for my semi annual cleanings. It will be painful, I will get a scolding and new appointment to come back in four weeks to replace a 35 year filling that is falling apart. It must be part of the 101 class on how to run a dentist office.

So what the heck am I going to do? Does this mean I move my Caddis flies out away from my nymphs? Do I put my BWO with my Sulphurs? Can I keep my Red Quills near my Adams? Oh the humanity what would Brad Pitt do?

Well the first thing I did was take stock of my situation. No that did not mean dashing to the fridge for a Yuengling. It meant not only figuring out where to put the flies, but understanding what I already had in the inventory. Maybe the dentist visits aren’t such a bad thing after all.

I then spent some time sorting through all those flies by putting them on the kitchen table. It became evident that this was not going to work when my English Springer Spaniel came up to me with a head full of flies that looked like Colonel Henry Blake’s fly fishing hat from M*A*S*H.

So I needed a way to get these flies organized. Just like you find at a fly shop, only smaller, cheaper, portable and something my dog wouldn’t wear on her head. Well after a little research it seems people who dabble in beads, whatever the hell that is all about, seem to have many of the same anxieties I do about being organized. Apparently there are lots of beads needing organized out there because there are quite a few choices on the art supply websites.

With a little more research they advertise these boxes for workshop organizers too. So I trucked on over to Home Depot to see if I could find something right away. I couldn’t possibly wait for the beadheads to ship me something that could take days. I needed to solve this problem before my next dentist visit.

I found the Rimax four tier rack of removable trays. Next to it were extra spare trays and I was able to get the whole set-up with a few extra trays for about $21. [chorus singing and clouds are parting] After what I saw the beadhead organizers were going to have to solve their problems without my help. I snapped up the trays and ran on home.
flyboxes
So now I can place all my flies into about eight portable trays fully organized by type and size. I could even label each tray. The plan will be to still haul most of my flies with me as I head out. However, I’ll load up just a couple of fly boxes as needed and leave the trays in the truck.

I know this has its fault’s. The most obvious is numnuts anticipating what might happen on the stream. Since my name is Dave and not the Amazing Kreskin this could be not so good when the March Browns make any early visit to Penn's Creek this year. I figure I’ll just always have to bring my standby favorite of five flies that catch me 90% of my fish anyway. I think that is all Ron let me have when I first got started. We will see how it goes.

Now if I can just get the ShamWow guy to clean my garage I’ll have time to go fishing!
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Published by Dave Kile [davekile] on 2009/9/5 (1960 reads)
When you have been out fishing for a while and changing flies over a period of a day you loose quite a bit of your tippet. One of the preferred methods for joining two different lines of similar size is the blood knot when joining sections of tippet or leader. This is one of the best methods for extending the length of your tippet.

A quick animated instruction for the blood knot and well as others can be found at: Animated Knots by Grog.

Aging eyes and dark evenings can really challenge some to tie this knot. I know plenty of nights I have calculated the time to tying tippet ratio. The last thing I would want to do is tie a blood knot at dusk.

The folks at Anglers Ace provides a simple little knot tying product that could save some time. Here is a quick slideshow showing how the product works.

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