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Update from the PFBC Big Spring Meeting

Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 12/24/2012 (1263 reads)
I always enjoy this time of year and it is not just for the egg nog and watching my favorite holiday movies with my family. It gives me time to look over the year and think about all the good things that happened. I often think about what I didn't get to as well, but I'll leave that as little gift for my therapist to work on with me later.

trout fishing-We had a host of Jams and Meet-ups through out the year including: The Steelhead Jam, Eastern PA Fly Tying Jamboree, Pocono Newbie Jam, Paflyfish Jam, Show up if you want to Jam, WarmWater Jam/Float, Catskill JAM, Quill Gordon Summit and many more. What I am always most proud of when I talk about the site is how helpful so many people are in helping others. People like Heritage Angler, Krayfish, PoconoPaul, The_Sasquatch, ryguyfi and many many others.

The site is made up of so many wonderful people that really think about and find ways to give back. Some of these are conservation efforts and many are just helping someone new to the sport. These activities touch a lot of people and I am thankful to be a part of that. I had some really good friends help me get started in fly fishing and I will hope you will continue to do the same.

In addition a special thanks to those who keep the site going and in order Maurice, Jack, David and Tom. Without their help WWII would look like a school yard brawl. They lead the site with so many efforts and I very much appreciate their support.

Our sponsors help to keep all the bits and bytes moving across the Internet and a special thanks to Allen Fly Fishing, Gogal Publishing Company, Montana Fly Fishing, Trident Fly Fishing, Harman's North Fork Cottages, Risen Fly and Rick Nyles at Sky Blue Outfitters.

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays,

Dave
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Published by Heritage-Angler on 12/12/2012 (1034 reads)
To all PAFF members, family, and friends:

The 2012 PAFF Eastern PA Fly Tying Jamboree will be held on Saturday December 15th, from 10AM - 6PM.

This event will be held at the Lehigh Gap Nature Center - a beautiful facility on the banks of the Lehigh River, near the intersection of Rt 873 and Rt 248. Information and directions to the Nature Center can be found here: http://lgnc.org/

scud"Tyers of all skill levels are encouraged to attend this event, and as usual, this event is free of charge. This will be a great opportunity to showcase your tying skills, help others learn your favorite patterns, and will allow everyone to improve their skills and learn new patterns and techniques.

We'll have tying space for at least 30+ tyers, and room for spectators as well. Newcomers to the art of tying flies are encouraged to attend, and there will be an opportunity to practice on tying equipment that will be provided, as well as an instructor to teach basic techniques.

After the Jam, we'll be heading over to Riverwalck's Saloon for dinner and refreshments - we have an entire room reserved for us.

Check out the post in the Tying forum for further details on what to bring. Please sign up for this event in the post in the Fly Tying Forum, so we know who'll be attending and the flies being tied. Please note the categories of tying techniques, and try to pick a pattern that fits into one of the categories.

A raffle of tying equipment and supplies will be held at the end of the day, with all proceeds being donated to the Nature Center. We should have some great items to win!

Looking forward to seeing old friends, and meeting new ones. This should be a really fun day!

Photo and fly by David Weaver

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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 12/03/2012 (911 reads)

2012 NJ Fly Fisherman of the Year from Tightline Productions on Vimeo.



The 3rd Annual NJ Fly Fisherman of the Year contest was held on November 10, 2012 on the South Branch of the Raritan River at Raritan Inn in Hunterdon County, NJ. Each of the ten New Jersey Trout Unlimited Chapters were invited to send challengers to this years competition. This year held some changes to the stream. During July fisheries biologist Joe Urbani and his team spent time working the stream bed to lower water temperatures, create defined channels, add holding pools and create scour potential to keep the river running deep. The next effect is a vastly improved stream and lots of pockets for the trout. There were nearly two dozen identifiable fine places to fish.

The day started with check-ins, hot coffee, and some rules orientation. The early rounds consisted of two fishing sessions and a "bye" cutting the contestants to three for the afternoon finals. Angelo Conti, Stuart Shaffron, and John Wester battled it out until a few minutes before the bell with Angelo Conti taking top honors. There was a serious amount of talent in the waters of the South Branch for this event. Thoughtful fly selections, multiple styles and plenty of river stewardship was evident all day long. The fellowship grew into the eventings banquet and generous amounts of comraderie.

Angelo Conti took top honors for the day with multiple large catches and a deft hand on the rod. More results can be found here.

Video provided from Tightline Productions.
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Published by Heritage-Angler on 11/27/2012 (676 reads)
A quick report from the International Fly Tying Symposium in Somerset NJ.

Hung around all day with Frequent Tyer, and delta_dog. Besides the fine company, it was a day of fun, learning, and seeing lots of old friends. As a special treat, I finally got to meet Charlie Craven in person. I'd spoken to him on the phone, and we were friends from the old VFS forum (Flyfisherman Magazine).

As a public service message, the fashion craze on feathers is over. There was LOTS of nice saddles available at better than ever prices. Time to stock up!

It was a day of multi-tasking for me, as I wanted to get donations for the PAFF Tying Jam raffle in a few weeks, and invite some local tyers to the event. I did better than expected!

The PAFF contingent of tyers did a great job of tying - their tables were pretty busy. For those that have enjoyed Eunan Hendron's intricate classic ties he posts here on PAFF, you may be wondering if he's really that good. BELIEVE IT!!! We just stood and stared in disbelief. Those that attend the tying jam are in for a real treat watching Eunan tie. He does a great job of explaining technique as he goes, and is more than willing to share his knowledge.


Charlie Craven

Eunan
Eunan Hendron

Mike
Mike Heck

gaeronf"
Gaeron Frederichs





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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 11/26/2012 (1386 reads)
Cyber Monday has hit and members of Paflyfish also have some deals coming by of our sponsors. There are some great deals to check out.

Allen Flyfishing
Savings of 10%-25% on orders!
Deals of the week! Thru November 30th

Trident Fly
Enjoy the best deals of the year Now - 12PM EST on Tuesday.
25% off on select Simms Products
20% off on all Fly Lines
15% off on all Leaders, Tippet, and Backing and more!

Gogal Publishing Company
For Cyber Monday, all PA Trout & Bass Maps reduced to $7.95 plus Free Shipping on orders over $10. These make a great stocking stuffers!
SPECIAL PRICE will appear in your shopping cart!
Details here

Risen Fly Cyber Monday Sale!!!
Purchase any reel during Monday's hours and receive a free line and backing! That's a $32.50 value!
Details here
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Published by Ryan Gouldsbarry [ryguyfi] on 11/12/2012 (1023 reads)
erieThe 4rd annual Erie Steelhead Jam will be November 16th through the 18th. If you have never fished for steelhead, head up a few times a year, or need counseling for your addiction you are welcome to come. This has been a great event held for the last few years that allows people from all over to come and hook into some big fish with some great company. My thoughts on Erie have always been that there are always going to be crowds, you might as well surround yourself with friends.

So here's the official plan of events.

We will meet every morning at the pavilion at Folly's End Campground. They have been generous to us for the last 3 years and continue to do so. You can camp out there if you please, park a camper, or even call to see if they have any available place to stay. They have a fully stocked fly shop and elk creek is about 25 yards from the pavilion.

We typically meet as a large group for coffee and donuts and split up from there. Sunrise at that time of year is right around 7:00am, so if we plan to meet around 8am each day that should work out just fine.

Friday is typically a day where people filter in all day long. If you plan to attend and are unfamiliar with where to go or don't know many people from the board please let me know and I'll arrange for you to be met up there at your arrival time to be shown around and have someone to fish with. Folly's is probably the best place to go if you're unsure. There will be people there all day at the pavilion and fishing at Elk in that area.

Each evening we will converge at Avonia Tavern. Let's plan to meet there around 7pm. (Sunset is at 5) This is a great place to grab a good bite to eat and a great beer with lots of room for our group. We'll try to arrange a large table there every day so we're not waiting around like in years past.

Last but not least is a place to sleep. A bunch of people stayed at Sunset Motel last year. It's not too far away from our meeting places and very clean and inexpensive. There are many other places to stay in the area. Feel free to look around and find what you're looking for.

If you need a cell phone number or 2 let me know and I can give you mine or someone else who will be there so that we can make sure you get hooked up with the group when you arrive.

Follow more of the plans for the weekend in the forum here.

Thanks to Ryan Gouldsbarry for organizing the meet-up!
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Published by David Weaver [Fishidiot] on 11/07/2012 (2029 reads)
The meeting was well attended and the attendees included John Arway and many of the PFBC staff including the Area Fisheries Managers involved with this project. Also present were many prominent names in the Pennsylvania Fly Fishing Community who you would recognize as well as local folks and some Big Spring old timers. The meeting presented the plan for a new restoration section in 2013 and proposed some changes for the future. Among the audience, the main source of disagreement, not surprisingly, dealt with the issue of what (if anything) should be done about the rainbows. Here's the short version of the meeting:

Big Spring Creek-PFBC biologists presented a ppt show describing the flow, cover, and depth changes in the section restored in 2010. The stream is now narrower, deeper, and slower, and has more non-vegetation cover and thus more "optimal" habitat for both brook and rainbow trout. The gravel used to block in the logs in this section is being used by rainbows for spawning and, in the future, smaller gravel should be used as this might reduce rainbow spawning success. Also, dissolved oxygen levels at the lower end of the FFO section and downstream into the ATW section are lower than optimal for wild trout.

-PFBC ppt show describing the electrofishing results of the section that was restored in 2010 and the sections used as control. After the 2010 restoration, brook trout numbers increased (roughly doubled) and rainbow numbers increased in the restored section by a greater margin (roughly four fold). These were the results revealed in the 2011 fish survey. The recent 2012 survey of these same sections revealed that rainbows, although still more numerous in the restored section, had declined a bit in 2011-2012. Brook trout numbers continued to rise in this section and in the upstream control section from 2011 to 2012.

-Over the entire course of the FFO section of Big Spring, as of autumn 2012, the trout population looks roughly like this: In the upper reaches - essentially the ditch down into the upper part of the restored section - now is about 60% brook trout. From the lower section of the restored area down to the bottom at Nealy Rd, rainbows are about 94% of the population.

-For the future, the PFBC management goal with respect to trout population.....is to get to a ratio of 70% brook/30% rainbow in the entire FFO section within five years (I believe this is numbers, not biomass). There are currently no plans to build a barrier and remove rainbows by electrofishing (these will be reconsidered in five years if necessary). To reduce rainbows in the next few years, it has been proposed to allow harvest in the FFO section. I wish to emphasize that this is a proposal still subject to approval by the commissioners. There is currently no change in the fishing regulations on BS. However, in the future, the FFO section may allow the harvest of several rainbows over 7 inches. This section will continue to be managed as FFO without bait or spin fishing.
This was the basic content and thrust of the meeting.

After the PFBC presentation there was considerable discussion and disagreement among the audience, mostly regarding the 'bows vs. brookies debate. I'd guess that the comments were about evenly divided between those wanting to leave the rainbows alone and those who feel they're a threat to brookies and should be removed or reduced. The meeting concluded with Arway's comments thanking the attendees and reminding us that the PFBC is still receiving comments and eager to hear your opinion on Big Spring.

Here is a PDF of the PFBC slide deck from the meeting. - Thanks just_jon
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Published by David Weaver [Fishidiot] on 10/31/2012 (1432 reads)
By David Weaver

Catskill Fly FishingSpent some time last month at the Catskill Fly Fishing Center and Museum(CFFCM) – what a wonderful place. If you’ve never been there before, next time you’re up in the Catskills or fishing the Delaware, take some time to head over to Livingston Manor and see this museum. You won’t regret it (especially if it’s a cold or otherwise lousy day for fishing). Although I’ll confess a stubborn loyalty to the Cumberland Valley as a heritage place in the history of the sport we love….clearly the Catskills stand tall as the birthplace and historical center of modern American fly fishing. Where better to have a museum to that legacy?

The CFFCM was started about three decades ago and was the brainchild of the estimable Elsie Darbee and her longstanding desire to see a repository for the history of fly fishing. Located on the banks of the legendary Willowemoc Creek, the museum exhibits multiple display areas covering the great personages of fly fishing and their fly tying collections, and old gear (looking at these old flies and gear is striking compared to what we’re used to today). Among these fly fishing luminaries would be the Wulffs, the Dettes, and the Darbees - not to mention many other innovative fishermen, writers, fly tyers, and conservationists.

Although focused on the Catskill heritage, the CFFCM covers all areas of the sport – for example, there’s a section on the Pennsylvania club, The Fontinalis Fly Fishermen, as well as an exhibit on Japanese fly fishing, bamboo rod making, and women fly fishers from around the U.S. The museum also includes/manages the Fly Fishing Hall of Fame and new members to this august body recently included several nationally known anglers, including Pennsylvania’s own Ed Shenk.

For 2013 the CFFCM is undergoing a major expansion that will provide more space for the many events sponsored by the museum. To find out more or join and support this great organization, please hit their website at: www.cffcm.net

David "Fishidiot" Weaver is a moderator and regular contributor on Paflyfish. Folks can find more about David and his artwork at www.rodandbrush.com






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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 10/25/2012 (1629 reads)
Patagonia flyfishing by Brian McGeehan
from Montana Angler Fly Fishing

As a youth growing up in Pennsylvania I enjoyed reading about many of the world’s famous wild trout destinations including Alaska, Kamchatka, Montana, Patagonia and New Zealand. As an avid trout fisherman I have been very fortunate to travel to many of the world’s destination wild trout locations and eventually moved to Montana. One of my favorite destination locations to visit is central Patagonia. Most of the other famous international destinations offer incredible fly fishing but there is often one style of fishing that you experience there: think sight fishing for huge browns in New Zealand or catching huge rainbows in Alaska. Patagonia is very similar in many ways to the American Northwest and resembles a blend of coastal Washington, Montana, Wyoming. My favorite characteristic of fishing Central Patagonia is the same thing that I love most about Montana: diversity. Just like my home waters in the Big Sky state you can fish a different river or stream every day including a sampling of spring creeks, trophy stillwaters, tailwaters and freestone rivers of all shapes and sizes. Although many aspects of Central Patagonia resemble the Rockies or Pacific Northwest - the lack of pressure from anglers is dramatically less than found in the Western US. I lead hosted trips to Patagonia most years in the off season and have several friends and guides that either run lodges or guide down south. Although I feel competent to speak to my experiences in Patagonia I don’t consider myself an expert on the region and there are still many fisheries in Argentina and Chile that I personally haven’t fished so this post is not designed to be an authoritative guide but just my own personal advice and notes on my travels to the area.

Where is Patagonia?
Patagonia simply refers to the southern Andes and includes both Chile and Western Argentina. Most of the classic trout fishing that you read about occurs in Northern and Central Patagonia. The far southern reaches of Patagonia are better known for sea run fisheries of huge brown trout like in Tierra del Fuego or the Rio Gallegos in Santa Cruz district. In general the Chilean side of Patagonia is much wetter and is home to some very large volume rivers. Chile looks a lot like the Cascades or Olympics in coastal Washington. Most of Argentine Patagonia is in the rain shadow of the Southern Andes and is much dryer. The scenery in Argentine Patagonia looks a lot like Montana, Wyoming and Colorado. Some of the regions like Los Alerces National Park are densely forested and others offer near desert climate depending on how close to the mountains you are. In general Chile is less developed and more remote, but it also is harder to get from river to river since each valley is essentially in a rugged fjord.

Patagonia Brown TroutNorthern Patagonia on the Argentine side is the most famous for fly fishing. This region is roughly north of Bariloche and south of San Junin de los Andes and includes legendary waters like the Malleo, Traful, Limay and Chimehuin to name a few. When visiting Northern Patagonia you typically stay on one or two of the massive estancias and wade or float fish on the estancia or float one of the local rivers using public access at bridges.

Central Patagonia fishing is centered around the Argentine town of Esquel. Esquel is about a 5 hour drive south of the larger tourist town of Bariloche. The good fishing extends to the north in Los Alerces National Park, to the east with the classic multi day float on the Rio Chubut or the spring creek fishing on Arroya Pescado, The massive Rio Grande and Futaleufu (on the Chilean side) and the remote Rio Pico region about three hours south of Esquel.

Getting to Central Patagonia
If you are planning on fishing the Argentine side of Central Patagonia or the Futaleufu in Chile you should plan on flying to Esquel. Plan on spending one night in Buenos Aires upon arrival. Most flights to the capital city leave the states in the evening and arrive in Argentina in the morning. I sleep well on flights and feel pretty good upon arrival after getting 6 or 7 hours of sleeping on the plane. There is generally only one flight to Esquel each day and they only are offered 4 days a week. There are usually around 7 flights a day into Bariloche every day which is to the north but if you can design your trip around the flight schedule into Esquel it is much more convenient. Although it is sometimes possible to get to Esquel on the same day you arrive in BA I don’t recommend it. The domestic flights are at a different airport and the connections are pretty tight if you are trying to catch a cab across the city. Buenos Aires is an amazing city and is often referred to as the Paris of South America. Enjoying one or two nights in BA is always a very enjoyable part of travelling to Argentina.

If you are fishing Chile (with the exception of the Futaleufu river which is just across the border from Esquel) you generally fly into Santiago and then connect the same day to Puerto Mount. Usually the lodge that you are travelling to arranges a charter flight from that point. There aren’t really many independent guides in this area and fishing on your own isn’t realistic due to the terrain so the lodge you team up with should handle all of your logistics. Farther south in Coique there are independent guides but the public waters in that area also receive more pressure.

I have visited every country from Mexico to Columbia and both Chile and Argentina. In my travels in both Chile and Argentina I have always felt very safe. My level of “safety radar” is about the same as when travelling in Europe which is a nice perk compared to some of the Central American countries that I have travelled in where you have to be much more alert to safety concerns.

More after the break here


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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 10/22/2012 (981 reads)
PFBC to Host Informational Meeting on Big Spring Creek Habitat Project
The Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC) is inviting anglers and the general public to an informational meeting on Tuesday, Oct. 30, at Big Spring High School in Cumberland County to learn more about the agency’s habitat and fisheries management plan for Big Spring Creek.

The meeting will begin at 6 p.m. and end at 7:30 p.m. The meeting is free and plenty of parking is available at the school, located at 45 Mount Rock Road, Newville, PA 17241.

“The purpose of the meeting is to present the agency’s habitat management plan for Big Spring Creek using funds provided by the PA Turnpike Commission as mitigation for environmental impacts associated with one of their planned construction projects in Cumberland County,” said Charlie McGarrell, the PFBC biologist leading the project. “We will describe the overall habitat project and will discuss how it will improve the overall fishery of the creek. After the presentation, the public will have the opportunity to ask questions.”

The Turnpike Commission has provided $586,000 for the habitat project, which will be located downstream of a large habitat project completed in 2010 on the creek. The project is currently in the design phase. Construction of the project is expected to begin by next summer and be completed by fall 2013.

For me details and information please visit the PFBC website.

Thanks to troubert for the notice
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