Register now on PaFlyFish.com! Login
HOME FORUM BLOG PHOTOS LINKS


Blog
Category Last published item
PaFlyFish.com  PaFlyFish.com
The Sulphurs are here!
Fly Fishing  Fly Fishing
Fly Fishing and the Phantom Drone
Edit category Product Review Product Review
USGS Water Data Goes Mobile
Hank Patterson's 8 Steps To Better Nymph ...
Fly Fishing Getting Started - Mayfly Sex ...
Interviews  Interviews
Interviews
Local Fly Shops! - Hank Patterson's Montana ...
Conservation  Conservation
New Zealand mudsnails in Spring Creek
Fly Tying  Fly Tying
Fly Tying Instructions - Black Foam Beetle
Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission  Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission
Update from the PFBC Big Spring Meeting

Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 2009/6/11 (831 reads)
Free Weekends in the National Parks
America’s Fun Ideas – the national parks – gets even better this summer with three fee-free weekends at more than 100 national parks that usually charge entrance fees.

Mark your calendars for fee-free weekends this summer:

* June 20-21, 2009 (Father’s Day weekend)
* July 18-19, 2009
* August 15-16, 2009

And to make the fun even more affordable, many national park concessioners are joining the National Park Service in welcoming visitors on this summer’s fee free weekends with the their own special offers.
  Send article

Published by Dave Kile [davekile] on 2009/6/7 (4850 reads)
Dave Weaver Interview - PaFlyfish.com
Dave Weaver is an artists that resides in south-central Pennsylvania. His artwork focuses on freshwater game fish, the saltwater flats, and the wildlife in and around Gettysburg. In addition to his wonderful paintings, Dave is an avid fly fisherman, civil war historian, and military veteran. His trout paintings truly standout and something I know many would enjoy learning more about.

1 - Dave: Tell me more about your background with your art.
I’m essentially self taught and would describe my art as best categorized as subject interest illustration. The word “illustration” tends to have somewhat low brow connotations in the elite fine art realm these days. That’s fine with me - my art isn’t a big deal. I think too many artists go to ridiculous lengths to explain how their work adds to the human condition or to demonstrate how sensitive they are. I don’t claim that my artwork has much real purpose other than to make fly fishermen happy.

Although I loved drawing animals as a kid, I didn’t start painting seriously until about 1992. It seems perfectly natural to me that my passion for sport fishing came to dominate my art topic matter. Any painter worth the stains on his or her palette has a passion for producing art – speaking for myself, however, I have a passion for fish and fishing and it’s really from this passion that my art got started. There’s something of a longstanding cliché among artists that it doesn’t matter what you paint, merely how you paint. While I agree with this in the abstract, for me subject matter – primarily trout – is a big part of what lured me back to drawing and putting paint to canvas. I started competing in trout stamp competitions about that time and eventually went on to win four competitions as well as placing in quite a few others. It wasn’t easy and a humbling experience.

While I’ve had the great good fortune to have had many mentors in other endeavors, with art I struggled to learn alone. I simply didn’t know anyone else who painted in the sport fishing genre whose shoulder I could watch over and to whom I could ask questions and seek constructive criticism on a regular basis. Fortunately there are many masters whose work I could study and I continue to scrutinize their work with an eye toward identifying the qualities that make it great. I did receive a lot of encouragement from fly fishermen and fly shops. In particular, I appreciate the encouragement from the late Dr Jack Beck of Cumberland Valley Trout Unlimited and Enoch “Inky” Moore of the Pa Fish and Boat Commission. Special thanks for getting me started in fly fishing art also needs to go to Yellow Breeches Outfitters, the first gallery (fly shop really) to show any confidence in selling my trout art. They continue to display my work after 15 years - ditto with regards to Lord Nelson’s Gallery here in Gettysburg. I sincerely appreciate their support.

2- Dave: Where do you get your inspiration?
Inspiration for me flows primarily from fish and their environs. This is particularly true with trout. As your readers are well aware, wild trout are possessed of absolute beauty and I’m as fascinated with the physical traits of trout as anyone, especially brook and brown trout. As I like to say, I could paint brook trout for the rest of my life and never get bored. However, the form and coloration of brown trout, I find, are more mysterious, ephemeral, and difficult to portray than brook trout. I can’t explain why this is, but browns have always been tougher for me. Whatever the case, any honest Pennsylvania fly fisherman is inspired by wild trout. So am I.

Gazing at the work of great sporting and fish artists is also inspiring. Most of the great sport fish artists are contemporary. The fishing art genre, however, recently lost its patriarch, Stanley Meltzoff, at the age of 89. In my view, the current master of fish art is Mark Susinno, who, not surprisingly, lives and paints here in PA. Not only is Mark the best game fish artist in the world, he’s a hard core fly fisherman and a heckuva nice guy. I’m also stunned by the beauty and accuracy of artists like Mike Stidham and Joseph Tomelleri. Paintings by artists like these masters on top of their game are always an inspiration to me.
  Send article

Published by Dave Kile [davekile] on 2009/6/6 (973 reads)
The Pennsylvania Fly Fishing Museum Association will be holding its 7th Annual Heritage Day - June 20, 2009.

Heritage Day has a great tradition of being a gathering of fly fishing enthusiasts all ages, interests, and skill levels. Don't miss out on next year's festivities. The event promises to be even better than this year's! So mark your calendar for June 20th (the Saturday of Father's Day weekend)

Please visit the website for more details.



Click to see original Image in a new window


  Send article

Published by Dave Kile [davekile] on 2009/6/5 (937 reads)
Too many trout in Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania trout anglers will be receiving a bonus of sorts with additional trout to be stocked in the Southeast part of the state. The fish are “extras” raised by the Bellefonte State Fish Hatchery this year.

The Commission stocks some 3.4 million adult trout in Pennsylvania waters open to public angling. This figure includes trout produced at state fish hatcheries, trout obtained from the United States Fish & Wildlife Service as part of a cooperative agreement, and trout obtained through a purchase contract with a commercial hatchery. The additional fish stockings represent a surplus from our Bellefonte Hatchery operations.

The first of these stockings will be on June 4th, with fish planted in section 2 & 6 of the Tulpehocken Creek, Berks County. On June 5th section 4 of the Pohopoco Creek in Carbon County and section 4 of Saucon Creek in Northampton County will receive fish.

A stocking is also planned for June 11th in section 3 of Hay Creek, Berks County.

  Send article

Published by Dave Kile [davekile] on 2009/6/3 (749 reads)
The PFBC has designated Sunday, June 7, as Fish For Free Days in the Commonwealth. Fish For Free Days allow anyone not just license holders or youth under the age of 16 to legally fish in Pennsylvania. From 12:01 a.m. to 11:59 p.m. on both days, no fishing license is needed to fish in Pennsylvania's waterways.
  Send article

Published by Dave Kile [davekile] on 2009/5/26 (2016 reads)
Click to see original Image in a new window



The USA Youth Fly Fishing Team held a successful National tryout and clinic on Fishing Creek at the Sieg Conference Center in Lamar, PA. on May 8 through the 10th with 33 kids in attendance from across the United States.

The members of the traveling team are:
Weston Reynolds, Harrisonburg, VA
Danny Marino, West Cornwall, CT
Matt Rose, Largo, FL
Zach Bearden, Gore, OK
Spenser Miller, Lewistown, PA
Will Travis, Dana Pt., CA
Noah Thompson, Austin, TX
Stephen Salwocki, Danville, PA

The Rest of the Team are:
Robbie Wirth, Moraga, CA
Cody Burgdoff, Lafayette, CO
Peter Sheetz, Mt. Joy, PA
Owen Welch, Lewistown, PA
Kyle Winey, Mifflintown, PA
Nick Denardo, McMurray, PA
Austen Randecker, Mill Hall, PA

Team USA Announces August Tryouts in Montana for the 2010 Team.
The USA Youth Flyfishing Team, Inc will hold the second tryout on the Stillwater River in Montana, August 7, 8, and 9. This will be the first of two tryouts for the 2010 team.


  Send article

Published by Dave Kile [davekile] on 2009/5/21 (696 reads)
The PFBC has designated Saturday, May 23, and Sunday, June 7, as Fish For Free Days in the Commonwealth. Fish For Free Days allow anyone not just license holders or youth under the age of 16 to legally fish in Pennsylvania. From 12:01 a.m. to 11:59 p.m. on both days, no fishing license is needed to fish in Pennsylvania's waterways.
  Send article

Published by Dave on 2009/5/15 (921 reads)
PaFlyFish Jamboree May 15-17, 2009
Well off to the PaFlyFish Jamboree for the weekend. We are looking forward to a great weekend of friends, sun, fun, bugs and trout. The forecast is Sulphurs, BWO, Light Cahills and chance of a passing storm late Saturday afternoon. All to be expected.

I hope anyone who can make it takes advantage of this opportunity to put a face with the names you see on the board. Every Jam for the past 10 years have been friendly and fun experience.

Hemlock Acres Campground
Sigler-Mainheim Pike
Coburn, PA 16832
  Send article

Published by Dave Kile [davekile] on 2009/5/8 (981 reads)
Click to see original Image in a new window
Many of us catch and release our fish. Photography is the one way we can return home with those sporting memories. There are so many good quality waterproof digital cameras today and there is no reason you can’t keep one accessible with you while on the stream. A few tips can really help show off that time on the water.

Read Your Manual
Learn your camera and read the manual. Your camera won’t make you a photographer, but has many settings that can help improve your pictures. Learn to move your settings out of the automatic mode and try some of the portrait, landscape or other programs depending on your subject. These settings offer many qualities that improve the lighting and focus of your pictures based on specific conditions.

Check The Lighting
The time and temperature of the light can play a key role in your photography. The early morning and evening light is often regarded as the best time for photography and referred to as the “golden hours.” The sunlight during these times is softer and does not provide the harsh contrast of mid-day shadows. When you are taking a picture of a friend at noon with that ball cap try adding the flash to fill in those shadows.

Have A Subject
We are talking about fly fishing so that includes people, water and fish. If you can get two or more of those subjects in your picture you off to a good start. A picture of a trout in the mud, next to your foot does have all three qualities, but is not going to land your photograph on a trout stamp. When taking a picture of a stream include an angler in action. Also, try moving your subject to one side of the picture or even adjusting your angle of view.

Be Sure To Focus
Nobody should have to question if that was a brown or brook trout in you pictures. Take advantage of the sensors in your camera that allow you to auto focus you shots. Most cameras visualize a solid dot when you are in focus. Keep the camera steady and on subject to capture that sharp image.

Get Closer
Just remember less feet and more face. There are many different subjects that you take pictures of while you are fly fishing. Just move in a little closer to capture the detail of the trout with that BWO fly you tied last winter.

Try these tips to improve those photographs while out on the stream.
  Send article

Published by Dave Kile [davekile] on 2009/5/8 (2951 reads)
Tom Skerritt, who starred in Robert Redford's "A River Runs Through It," returns to fly-fishing as the narrator of "Rivers of a Lost Coast." The documentary explores the rise and fall of fly-fishing in California from its inception at the turn of the 20th century to the 1980s, when salmon and steelhead began disappearing from the state's waterways.

The film is being shown in limited venues across the west and is still undetermined if it will be released out East just yet.

Here is the trailer.

  Send article

RSS Feed



Site Content
Login
Username:

Password:

Remember me



Lost Password?

Register now!
Stay Connected

twitterfeed.com facebook instagram RSS Feed

Sponsors
Polls





Copyright 2014 by PaFlyFish.com | Privacy Policy| Provided by Kile Media Group | Design by 7dana.com