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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 07/22/2009 (2769 reads)
Pennsylvania Fly Fishing Hats Going Quickly - On Sale!!
There are a good number of hats left from the Jamboree. If you are interested in purchasing one Email Maurice at moechi21@gmail.com and we can begin the process.

We experimented with some different colors this year. We have one left that is orange(tangerine) that would be good for fishing during hunting season and even a couple pink ones for the ladies out there There is a Navy color that looks like a dark denim.

And as always the all tan and two-tone with green, blue or charcoal visor.

The normal price shipped is $20 to your door.

On Sale Now While Supplies Last for $15.00!!
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Published by Dave Kile [davekile] on 07/19/2009 (7320 reads)
Tenkara is the traditional Japanese method of fly-fishing. Only a rod, line and fly are used. Daniel W. Galhardo recently founded Tenkara USA and has attracted an avid following of people who also appreciate this style of fly-fishing that is particularly well-suited for fly-fishing small streams and backpacking.



1- Dave: Please tell me how and when you got started into tenkara.
Daniel: I have been fishing my entire life, and fly-fishing for the last 12 years. Progressively I went through phases of trying different methods of fishing, from cane pole fishing using telescopic rods and bait as a young kid in Brazil, to lure fishing, to fly-fishing, and finally tenkara. Until I discovered tenkara the complexities only grew but added little to my overall fishing experience. A couple of years ago I came across a book called“Angling in Japan”. It was published in English some 70 years ago by the Japanese Board of Tourism and described the various fishing methods practiced in Japan. Ironically, tenkara, the only traditional fly-fishing method in Japan, was the smallest chapter in the book. Having lived in China during college, and being married to Margaret, who is Japanese American, prompted me to do more in-depth research on this unique combination of Asian culture and fly-fishing. About a year ago on a visit to Japan where I stopped at every tackle shop I saw, I became personally familiar with tenkara. I was quickly sold on its simplicity and effectiveness, and, being a small-stream aficionado, found it was what I had always been looking for.

2- Dave: What was one of the most interesting or surprising things that you learned when traveling in Japan about tenkara?
Daniel: Two days before departing for our trip to Japan I learned about a region in Japan where fly-tying and rod-making are designated as official traditional crafts. In the city of Kanazawa we visited a family that has been tying flies for 20 generations – over 430 years – from the same shop. They started as needle makers and soon were making flies for Samurai to go fishing. Later I learned those rods and flies are actually for “Ayu fishing” not tenkara. Nevertheless, this was still extremely impressive. Japan has many very narrowly defined methods of fishing, and though some are very similar at a first glance they have important distinctions. Ayu fishing for example, uses flies and long telescopic rods, but is not really considered fly-fishing as casting is not required to get the fly to the fish, it’s a bit more like dapping. They also have cane-pole fishing with telescopic rods for carp, and stream fishing with telescopic rods and bait. All rods and equipment are very different and highly specialized. Among all these methods, tenkara is the only real fly-fishing.

3-Dave: Tell me what inspired you to start Tenkara USA?
Daniel: During our trip I bought a tenkara rod and started thinking of all the waters I could fish when coming back to the US. Upon our return I fished it a lot and realized it was perfect for every stream I fished, and the long rod was much more effective at fishing most of them. Holding a fly in place on the other side of a current was probably the main advantage of using such long rods. I fell in love with it, the simplicity, technique, effectiveness, not to mention history. Also, as a backpacker, I really liked its portability and the full setup is so light. I started looking around and couldn’t find other tenkara rods or much information at all. After asking myself “why?” and coming up with no good answer I decided I had to introduce tenkara to anglers in America, a pretty ambitious goal considering it’s a foreign way of fishing that does not target the biggest fish in the rivers. But, I know that not every angler is after the biggest fish, most are after the experience.

4-Dave: What makes tenkara so appealing to someone already fly fishing in the traditional [western] style?
Daniel: In May of this year, Dr. Hisao Ishigaki, one of the leading authorities in tenkara fly-fishing in Japan, came to give a presentation and demonstration in the Catskills, at an event hosted by the Catskills Fly Fishing Center and Museum. We spent a lot of time together, and the two reasons he says he likes tenkara are: 1st simplicity, 2nd it’s about focusing on your technique and presentation not the gear, and whether you catch fish or not is up to you. For what I see simplicity is drawing most people to try it, and the technique is making sure people stick with it. I would also add it’s a very effective way of fishing, and in Japan it’s commonly said that tenkara outfishes western fly-fishing 5-1. Lastly, tenkara provides the most direct connection between fisherman and fishing; though he’s not talking about tenkara, to borrow the words from angler and writer Ed Engle, "What I like most is catching a trout in the most direct way possible. My most memorable fish have been the ones where there was as little between me and the trout as possible.”

5-Dave: Tell me about the Tenkara equipment and what kind of costs should someone expect to get started.
Daniel: In tenkara there is only a rod, the line, and a fly, the essential elements of fly-fishing. Dispensing with the expensive reels, and expensive lines, which don’t really see use in small stream angling, an angler can get started with high-end tenkara gear set at $150. That is compared with approximately $400 and up for good quality western fly-fishing gear.

6-Dave: Are there special flies for tenkara or can one use traditional materials.
Daniel: Any fly will work, I personally still use elk-hair caddis on most of my fishing. However, some traditional tenkara patterns were developed to work very well with tenkara rods. The long rods give anglers a lot more control on the presentation and manipulation of flies. The reverse hackle of some tenkara fly patterns is a distinct feature that works well to give the fly a lot of “life”. In tenkara one is more concerned with presentation and “giving life” to the fly, rather than the perfect imitation of insects.

7-Dave: Is there any special amount of training or time needed to learn the tenkara style of fly fishing?
Daniel: No special training, that’s the beauty of tenkara, it is easier to do. The main thing for experienced fly-fishermen is to remind themselves to slow down a little, and shorten the casting strokes. Nevertheless, tenkara can also offer anglers something that may take a lifetime to master. There is a huge variety of casting techniques that one can learn and practice with tenkara and there’s already enough to learn about reading water and presentation to be encumbered by gear. Like Dr. Ishigaki said, it’s about the technique; and the nuances of reading water and properly presenting a fly don’t come overnight.

8-Dave: Have you seen much interest in tenkara in Pennsylvania and if so why?
Daniel: Pennsylvania is currently the 4th state with the largest number of tenkara anglers in the US, following California, Colorado, and Utah. Watching Mr. Joe Humphreys’ videos before launching Tenkara USA made me think of Pennsylvania as a natural state for tenkara fly-fishing. All the techniques and places Mr. Humphrey was showing made me constantly think, “What if Joe Humphreys had a tenkara rod in those videos?” Though counterintuitive to think of using such long rods for small streams, I have found the long rod gives you control and precision ideal for all but the brushiest streams. The shorter casting stroke, the ability to cast with a flick, or even better, the perfect tool for the “bow-and-arrow” cast that Mr. Humphrey made popular, make tenkara a very effective and versatile tool even in the Pennsylvania brush streams. And, if the streams get too brushy, then you also have the ability to shorten the rod a bit as they are telescopic.

9-Dave: Tell me where do you see the future of tenkara going?
Daniel: In these first few months in business we have seen a very large and growing following despite our “zero-marketing-budget”. I wanted to see the interest for tenkara growing in a completely organic way, where anglers learned from other anglers about its simplicity, effectiveness and other reasons to do tenkara fishing. I believe anything good is spread by word of mouth. I didn’t want ads to convince anyone to do it and have it become a fad. Tenkara is nothing new, it has been around for hundreds of years and is still practiced in Japan for a reason. It is always going to be a small-stream fly-fishing niche. But, much like Spey casting was introduced for anglers pursuing large fish in large rivers, tenkara deserves its place for anglers pursuing a different angling experience in small streams. There is a very passionate group of people that got into tenkara in the past few months and I believe may soon retire their reels; I expect that number will continue to grow with people who will find the tenkara simplicity, “refreshing”.

10-Dave: Where should people go if they want to learn more or get started with tenkara?
Daniel: Just go to your nearest or favorite stream! I believe angling is not a science that requires years of theoretical learning, or countless hours of instruction. It requires going out there and fishing. The best way is to learn 3 simple knots, go out there, and fish. Though theory and specific knowlege is interesting and will always help a bit, the industry has made angling seem difficult and intimidating by introducing a lot of complexity to it. The most difficult element of learning western fly-fishing is casting, tenkara reduces that dramatically and I hope it will make it easier to introduce more people to fly-fishing. To learn more about tenkara, one may visit our site, www.tenkarausa.com . Our site also has an active forum where members can discuss tenkara and connect with other anglers, though I’m afraid there may not be a whole lot to discuss in the long term since in the end it’s just you with a rod, line and a fly.

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Published by Heritage-Angler on 07/17/2009 (1571 reads)
PaFlyFish Casting Clinic
The PAFF Informal Casting Clinic was held on Wednesday, 7/15/09, at 3:30 PM on the banks of the Little Lehigh. This event was as much a chance to meet some fellow PAFF members as it was a casting clinic, and a good time was had by all.

As Dave Kile has pointed out before, PAFF has some really skilled anglers, and this event was further proof of this. Dave Rothrock, a certified FFF casting instructor, was kind enough to provide his impressive teaching skills to his fellow PAFF members free of charge at this event. To all who attended, I hope each of you took something with you that will improve your skill level, and enable you to catch more fish.

PAFF has grown exponentially over the years. We've come a long way from the old "continuous threads" format of the old forum, but the heart and soul of the forum is still the incredibly talented membership of this forum. Kudos to Dave Kile for providing us with such a great resource!

This event was an informal get-together to share some of the wealth of knowledge that exists on the board and with its members. As Afish stated, it was just something some of the members came up with to promote good will and camaraderie amongst our fellow board members. A common thought that was expressed throughout the evening was a sense of regret people had for not being able to attend the "official" PAFF Jamboree. Events like these provide a way for us to get together and share skills and good times without having to make a multi day commitment in time that many just can't do. Look for more of these "Mini Jams" in the future!

On a personal note, I was surprised that we didn't have any beginners attend this event. It was a perfect opportunity to get some free casting help. An even bigger surprise was the really experienced anglers that showed up - for example, Afishinado. Smart anglers take every opportunity to further their skills, and a better casting skill set is always desirable. The never ending quest to improve oneself as a flyfisherman is one of the best things about the sport IMHO.

Photographs from the afternoon

Next up - The Trico Summit! More info to follow on this.......
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Published by Dave Kile [davekile] on 07/13/2009 (1376 reads)
The House Republican budget proposal outlined today misses the mark on the amount of state forest land available for natural gas development, and the amount of revenues that could be generated through a lease sale, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Acting Secretary John Quigley said.
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Published by Dave Kile [davekile] on 07/06/2009 (935 reads)
The Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC) will consider authorizing several property-related matters to improve public fishing and boating access in Erie, Venango and Lebanon counties when the agency holds its summer quarterly meeting on July 13-14 at its Harrisburg office.

Among other items on the formal agenda, commissioners will consider approving a $400,000 grant to American Rivers, Inc. for the removal of Howell Dam and stream bank and habitat restoration activities along Sewickley Creek in Westmoreland County. The funding comes from the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission to mitigate impacts associated with a reconstruction and widening project in the area.

Staff has recommended that commissioners approve three grants exceeding $100,000 as part of the Sinnemahoning Creek Watershed Restoration program in Cameron, McKean, Elk and Potter counties. The grants include $240,000 to the Cameron County Conservation District; $315,400 to the McKean County Conservation District; and $114,695 to the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy. At the conclusion of its meeting on Tuesday, the Commission will announce 21 additional grants of up to $100,000 as part of the restoration program.

Commission committees will meet beginning at 10 a.m. on Monday, July 13, and again at 8 a.m. on Tuesday, July 14. Formal consideration of the agenda by the full Commission will begin at approximately 2:15 p.m. on Tuesday, July 14. All committee meetings and the review of the agenda are open to the public.

A complete copy of the meeting schedule and the full agenda for the meeting can be found on the Commission’s web site at http://www.fish.state.pa.us/minutes.htm .
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Published by Dave Kile [davekile] on 06/25/2009 (2479 reads)
By Marshall Cutchin at MidCurrent.com

Two fly fishing magazines -- one Canadian and one U.S. -- have combined resources in a new streaming video site that describes itself as "the web's first and only streaming HD 1080i fly fishing video portal." Fly Max Films HD Theater already has an impressive set of large-format videos: segments on fly fishing in Stuart, Florida, Alaska fly fishing with April Vokey, and fly fishing for gar, among the 13 clips on the site. The project is co-produced by Hatches magazine and The Canadian Fly Fisher, whose Nick Pujic said in a press release yesterday, "'Not only are we more than tripling the resolution of other web videos typically found on you-tube or other such sites, but we are also offering this new technology to our clients, so they can host and stream their own HD video on their own websites."
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Published by Dave Kile [davekile] on 06/18/2009 (13939 reads)
Bellefonte Named the Best Fly Fishing Town in Pennsylvania
Bellefonte proudly proclaims to be “Central Pennsylvania’s Victorian Secret” with it’s charming homes in a modern world, but it is no secret to anglers that it also holds a charm all its own when it comes to fly fishing. Nestled in the Nittany Valley of Centre County, Bellefonte is home to some of the premier fly-fishing waters in Pennsylvania. The members of PaFlyFish.com have selected Bellefonte, Pennsylvania as the Best Fly Fishing Town in Pennsylvania for 2009.

Anglers enjoy the world-class fly-fishing waters of Spring Creek that meanders through the town. Other prominent streams such as Penns Creek, Fishing Creek, Spruce Creek and the Little Juniata River are all in close proximity too. The mountain fed and limestone streams provide cool productive waters through out the year that are a delight to fly fishing enthusiasts.

Members of the Pennsylvania fly-fishing community at PaFlyFish.com resoundingly selected Bellefonte in a recent poll as the Best Fly Fishing Town in Pennsylvania. Selected for not only the close proximity to the many wonderful streams in the area, but its hospitality, shops, dining and accommodations. With a lodging named the Riffles and Runs Bed and Breakfast how can this not be a wonderful fly fishing town.

Bill Simmeth, member at PaFlyfish.com adds, “If I would ever move somewhere close to good fly fishing, Bellefonte would be at the top of my list. The town has all the amenities a fly fisherman could want with good restaurants, accommodations and two great fly shops nearby. Yet it still has that nice small town feel to it."

Walt Goldman, Mayor of Bellefonte, commented, “We are thrilled to hear that Bellefonte has been recognized for this wonderful designation. Bellefonte welcomes all fly fishing anglers to come and visit our wonderful town."

Thanks to www.VisitPa.com for the Bellefonte picture.

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Published by Dave Kile [davekile] on 06/18/2009 (1700 reads)
Resized Image


Many anglers are looking forward to time with the family and some possible time on the water fly fishing. Here are some happens around the state.

Boiling Springs - June 20th in Boiling Springs will be PA Fly Fishing Heritage Day. This is held at the pavilion at Allenberry and involves some nice tying and casting demos as well as the chance to talk to local and national experts about insects, bamboo rods, etc.

Yellow Creek, Bedford County - June 20th The Yellow Creek Coalition there will be a pig roast fund raiser Sat. June 20th (food at 2pm) just up the road from the fly fishing project. Contact Fred Sherlock at 814-766-3176

Sunbury - June 18-21 Fathers Day ’09 promises to be a lively day in Shickshinny when 80 paddlers land in town as part of the North Branch Susquehanna Sojourn. The 100 mile, six day sojourn begins on June 18 upriver at Vosberg Neck and comes to Shickshinny on June 21. It ends on June 23 at Shikellamy State Park, Sunbury, at the confluence of the River’s North and West branches.

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Published by Dave Kile [davekile] on 06/16/2009 (957 reads)
Fathers Day ’09 promises to be a lively day in Shickshinny when 80 paddlers land in town as part of the North Branch Susquehanna Sojourn. The 100 mile, six day sojourn begins on June 18 upriver at Vosberg Neck and comes to Shickshinny on June 21. It ends on June 23 at Shikellamy State Park, Sunbury, at the confluence of the River’s North and West branches.

Community members are invited to greet the sojourners at Shickshinny’s Crary Park on South Canal Street at 6:30 p.m. Cake and ice cream will be served and kayak demonstrations by Endless Mountain Outfitters will be available for anyone who wants to try paddling.
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Published by Dave Kile [davekile] on 06/16/2009 (841 reads)
Meetings Announced to Obtain Public Input on Potential Reduction in Daily Creel Limits

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) will be holding two public information meetings on potential recreational fishing regulation changes being considered for Delaware River American shad. The shad population is in significant decline and in need of rebuilding, prompting DEC to pursue decreasing the current daily creel limit from six fish to three fish.

In New York, recreational fishing on the Delaware River usually takes place from late April through early June, when shad move into the river to spawn. Changes to the daily creel limit would help reduce the amount of adult shad taken by recreational fishing in the New York waters of the Delaware and its tributaries. Pennsylvania has already initiated a regulation change consistent with the changes DEC is considering.

For further information regarding New York's current fishing regulations, please visit the DEC website at: http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/7917.html .
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