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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 04/18/2010 (3641 reads)
The Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC) has been stocking fingerling rainbow and brown trout throughout the Lehigh River for a few years now. In the spring of 2009 the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission initiated a study to determine the contribution of hatchery fingerling trout stocking to angler catch in at the Francis E Walter outflow to confluence Sandy Run and the confluence Sandy Run to relic dam above Palmerton of the Lehigh River. They are now entering a phase where they will try to assess the viability of the program. Over the past year we have seen some amazing growth rate for fingerling trout, rainbows in particular, and we are hopeful that the PFBC will find that the trout that they have been stocking will have a positive influence on the fishery.

trout finYour help is needed, in addition to survey boxes located at many popular fishing spots along the river we have created an online reporting system located here.

If you catch any trout while fishing the Lehigh River, please take the time to report your catch and also pay attention for fin clips while fishing as these will help to assess if/when the fish may have been stocked by the PFBC or other organizations such as the LRSA.

Snail mail cards are located at the aforementioned boxes located at some of the more popular fishing locations and angler log books can be downloaded from the PFBC PDF here.

Thanks to Tim Skoraszewski and Paul Kanaskie at Rivers Outdoor Adventures and all the members of the Lehigh Coldwater Fishery Alliance and Lehigh River Stocking Association for their conservation efforts on the Lehigh River.
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Published by Dave Kile [davekile] on 04/17/2010 (3538 reads)
A mayfly hatch is the grand finale in the year long seasonal play that returns annually for trout and anglers.

This show begins the previous season with mature female mayflies, called spinners, laying their eggs on the surface of the water. The eggs shortly hatch into small larvae and quickly change to nymphs.

The nymph phase of the mayfly is the longest and will last just about one year. During this time the nymph will grow and molt regularly. Molting is when the mayfly breaks out of its old skin and a larger one is exposed underneath to protect it during the next growth cycle. A mayfly will molt many times during the several phases of its life.

MayFly StagesThe emergence stage can be a quick and dangerous time for these transitional nymphs. Trout can find and aggressively feed on these insects that normally may be hiding or burrowing at the bottom of a stream. Once the emerger swims to the surface film these nymphs molt their skins and expose there wings.

The cloudy, grayish wings they emerge with give them there name: dun. The duns sit on top of the water and prepare its wings for flight. Once the dun escapes the water, it will head for the trees for several days.

While maturation occurs during this stage a dun may molt several more times until it becomes a spinner. As spinners, male and female mayflies will seek each other out to mate. The females will quickly lay her eggs back at the water starting the cycle over again.

The cycle ends when the dead and dying mayflies drop to the stream. The spent wing spinner is the one final opportunity for tout to feed on the last stage of this great yearlong production provided by the mayfly.

To learn and discuss more about mayflies on the site head over to the Hatch and Entomology Forum






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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 04/13/2010 (4109 reads)
Wild Trout Streams are a secret treasure for many fly fisherman in Pennsylvania. Many anglers hold a certain reverence for the quiet and often secluded opportunity they provide. With over 500 wild trout streams and well over 1,000 miles of water these hidden gems are a different kind of stream for fly-fishing. Some of these streams are unnamed or are tributaries of lesser waters. Rarely mentioned by name or found on many maps, this intimate experience also comes with greater stewardship and responsibility for those that take on these waters.

wild trout streamThe fly fishing experience in these backwoods areas are often regarded as one of self reliance and stealth. These small streams can provide a surprising opportunity to explore and uncover trout in a more wilderness environment. Much of the experience is not only finding these streams, but then learning the secrets of what makes these wild trout so illusive.

The Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC) defines Class A Wild Trout Streams as: "Streams that support a population of naturally produced trout of sufficient size and abundance to support a long‐term and rewarding sport fishery." The PFBC’s manages these stream sections for the the growth of the wild trout fishery with natural reproduction and no stocking. These streams can hold brook trout, brown trout or both species.

The PFBC is considering changes to its list of Class A Wild Trout Streams. At the next Commission meeting on April 19 and 20, 2010, the Commission will consider changes to its list of wild trout streams. Specifically, the Commission will consider the addition of over 80 new streams or changes to current watts of streams to the list.

So if you want to get a little wild try something new, it may be in your backyard.
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 04/05/2010 (1664 reads)
Recently I starting working with my son on how to fly-fish. He was a little apprehensive about going out with me our first time. I was pleased to learn that his concern was not because of my wonderful "bark and nag" approach to learning, but rather he was a little intimidated with the thought of have to cast a dry fly right away.

Since we were going out in March I explained that we were going to be using a lot of weighted wooly buggers that first day. We talked about how a roll cast was type of casting we were going to focus on his first day and not anything more complicated like an forward cast. Once understood he was put at ease and really did a good job just working on the roll cast his first day out.

The roll cast is pretty easy and frequently used casting method for subsurface weighted flies and streamers. It is also very good when there is very little room to back cast. The video explains the basic roll cast.



Getting line to carry a traditional dry fly involves the the forward cast. The basics for fly fishing the forward cast involves good timing as you stroke and halt your cast until it is released. In principle energy is built up into the rod and transferred to the line as it moves back and forth. Your fly at the end of your line is just a tourist as the line gets tossed out onto the water. Another video shows good form and practice for the forward cast.



I really encourage that you take some time and practice this out of the water first. Watch the videos so you can visualize the proper method for success in doing this first. Find a nice open field with little wind and give it a go for 30 minutes.
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 04/03/2010 (1759 reads)
flyfishingApril 3 marks the opening of trout season for fifteen counties in Southeastern Pennsylvania.

All waters in Adams, Berks, Bucks, Chester, Cumberland, Dauphin, Delaware, Franklin, Juniata, Lancaster, Lebanon, Lehigh, Montgomery, Northampton, Perry, Philadelphia, Schuylkill and York counties are open for regular trout fishing season.

All streams in this region are now open for fishing 24 hours a day, creel limits of 5 combined species and a minimum of seven inches. Different rules and regulations apply for other Special Regulation Areas. Please consult with the Summary of PA Fishing Laws and Regulations, distributed by the PFBC for details about regulations on Pennsylvania.

The regular season for the remaining counties is April 17.
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 03/21/2010 (1940 reads)
Thanks for making the Tying/Fishing Mini-Jam a success. It was good to meet some guys I'd never met before, and put faces to names here.

paflyfishThe guys at the shop were very pleased with our group, and one even came down to fish with us when the shop closed. (Thanks Matt!) At the end of the day, we had the good fortune to run into our local WCO, Lee Creyer. Lee has a solid reputation in these parts, and it was nice to see him and be able to spend a few minutes with him. He's as excited as we are about our new Executive Director, John Arway. The future of the PFBC is looking bright, indeed!

Special thanks to Old Lefty (Dave Rothrock) and afishinado for their instruction today - they did a great job, as always.

It was a relief to find that we didn't cause a rift in the Time-Space Continuum by putting afishinado (Tom C) and Afishn (Tom C) in the same room. Tim Murphy would have been all kinds of confused!

We also set a new precedent for a PAFF gathering - perfect weather! Let's hope it's a trend that continues. It was a beautiful day, and I personally had a great time. Judging from the turnout today, the PAFF Jamboree in May is gonna be HUGE! We could have used name tags today - whoever suggested that in the Jam thread had a great idea.

Special Thanks to Heritage-Angler for putting this Mini-Jam together!
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 03/19/2010 (2389 reads)
Pennsylvania’s Hatchery Trout Receive Good Report Card
As the 2010 trout season opens next month, Pennsylvanians are reminded that fishing is a fantastic way to enjoy the state’s great outdoors and get some exercise with friends and family. It is also important to remember that fresh trout and other fish can be an important part of a healthy, balanced diet.

“Fish are high in protein and are a valuable source of vitamins, minerals and beneficial oils that are low in saturated fat,” notes John Arway, Executive Director of the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC). “Trout are especially high in vitamin B-12 and omega-3 fatty acids, which improve cardiovascular health and brain development in children.”
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 03/10/2010 (2872 reads)
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 03/08/2010 (1970 reads)
We have taken several posts to provide a brief overview on getting setup with a rod, reel and line. The configuration of a 9’ 5 weight graphite rod and matching reel will really serve you well for standard trout fly-fishing in most Eastern streams.

Let’s wrap up our Rod, Reels & Lines Posts with a look at some setups for entry-level budgets.

How Low Can You Go?
The Cabela's Genesis Fly Combos are good for anyone who wants to start fly-fishing at some of the lowest prices. Cabela’s gets you started with a graphite rod, reel, backing and fly line for less than $50. The biggest knock on this combo is the reel seems to have some amount of plastic in its construction. There are other Cabela's Combos that have better construction if you are looking to upgrade. I would only suggest this $50 combo for someone who is not really sure if fly-fishing is going to be his or her thing.

orvisA Name You Know
If you are willing to make a little more commitment to fly-fishing Orvis is a brand that provides some better quality and choices. Orvis doesn’t hold the luster it used to by some anglers, but it is still a very good start. The Orvis Streamline 905-4 Tip Flex Fly Rod Combo is a 9’ 5-weight fly rod, Clearwater cast-metal reel, WF Fly Line, and backing. This was the type of combo I started with over 27 years ago. I still have the 4wt version of this setup that I load into my truck every time I head out. The current package is $159 and will serve you well for many years.

Rolling Your Own
Scouting the Internet you can find a variety of brands and deals. A little bit newer company here in the East is Albright Fishing Products. They offer some surprisingly good values for rods and reels. Combined with some line you can pick up yourself and you have a pretty good deal for about $114.00.
• Albright Rod TW90562 5/6 9' 2 piece for $30.00
• Albright TWR5/6 aluminum built reel for $40.00
• Cortland 333+ WF Floating Fly Line $30.00
• Cortland 20lb. 150 yards Backing $14.00

Before making a purchase you might want to stop into you local fly shop and check what they have to offer as well. Aside from gear they should be able provide a lot of good local advice too.

Most of the products in this price point have some trade-off in construction and typically poor warranties compared to some of the higher end gear. There are many choices if you feel like you want to push your budget over the $200. You can jump into the forums to get plenty of sound advice.

Time to get started. In our next post we will tie this stuff together.
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 03/08/2010 (32315 reads)
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