Register now on PaFlyFish.com! Login
HOME FORUM BLOG PHOTOS LINKS


Blog
Category Last published item
PaFlyFish.com  PaFlyFish.com
Hank Patterson for President 2017 - The Best Bad ...
Fly Fishing  Fly Fishing
John Brown's Bass - Part 1 by David Weaver
Edit category Product Review Product Review
The Ultimate Angling Accessory - The New Bentayga ...
Fly Fishing Boxes and the ShamWow Guy is No Help
Fall Fly Fishing Opportunities in Pennsylvania
Interviews  Interviews
Interviews
Another Great Fish – Old George
Conservation  Conservation
Rivers Conservation and Fly Fishing Youth Camp ...
Fly Tying  Fly Tying
Fly of the Month: The Goldilocks Stonefly
Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission  Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission
DCNR, Fish & Boat Move to Protect Wild Trout ...

Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 09/21/2010 (1828 reads)
The Muddy Creek Chapter of Trout Unlimited like so many TU chapters in Pennsylvania does an amazing amount of work with conservation efforts for it's watershed. I am a big fan of these guys and the effort they make to keep up with projects in all aspects of the watershed.

The public is invited to attend an Open House on Saturday, September 25 from 11:00 am to 4:00 pm. Come out to see the recent renovations to the Chapter’s Co-operative nursery grounds where they raise 8,000 trout that are stocked for the public in the Muddy Creek Watershed.

Activites will include:
Trout and Native Plant Nursery tours
Aquatic life exhibits
Trout egg incubator exhibit
Fly tying demonstrations
Fly casting demonstrations
Stream improvement project tours.

Food will be available for purchase including hamburgers, hot dogs, brauts and soft drinks. Chapter merchandise will also be available for purchase with a fly fishing rod raffle leading the fundraising effortin addition to bucket raffles for an Orvis Battinkill Bar Stock II 4/5/6 reel, Orvis Chest Pack, Framed shadowbox of flys and an assortment of 64 flys. We will also have fly tying materials for sale at bargain prices along with our fishing caps and collectible patches.

Directions to the nursery grounds are: Rt.74 to Brogue, turn at the Brogue Post Office onto Muddy Creek Forks Road, continue 2 miles to Left on Sechrist Rd, Follow Sechrist past Allegro winery to stop sign. Nursery grounds will be directly across.

Visit the MCTU website at www.muddycreektu.org
  Send article

Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 08/30/2010 (10692 reads)
Last fall I decided to retire my old vest. Not that new things are always better, but my approach to fly fishing had change since I purchased my old vest 20 years ago.

More recently I find myself hiking into many spots and need to be a little more nimble. I am not fooling myself, I do realize nimble and me parted ways many years ago. Damn carbs! It seemed I was overstuffing my vest with loads of fly boxes and too much extra gear. Quite frankly casting was a bother as I had eight - ten different boxes crammed in all over my vest. One big final new requirement was being able to bring my camera and reach it with relative ease.

Of course I did a lot of research on the Internet and ultimately made my way to over to a fly shop and get the touchy feely thing going. Stopped into TCO Flyshop while on one of my daughters college road shows (please pick PSU, please pick PSU) and got some help from Chris. He was a big help and I settled in on the William Joseph Confluence chest pack. Now this pack has been out for a couple of years, but I still get asked a lot about vests and chest packs.

williamOnce I made the switch I really enjoyed using the chest pack this season. First I had to repack all my fly boxes and gear, which in itself was a good thing. (See blog post here.)

The front of the pack has plenty of room for all my essential small gear. The zippers are awesome. Nothing worse than trying to keep things contained and getting held up on stuck zipper. In the front zippered section I can load up plenty of spools of tippet, split shot, a small knife and sunglasses.

The main front compartment is designed for fly storage. William Joseph provides a foam fly holder, which I keep loaded with several of my go to flies, nymphs and streamers. About the only thing I didn't like with the pack is the mesh that is inside this compartment to separate items like fly boxes and the foam board. Often the flies on the foam would easily fall off and get stuck in the mesh separator. There is room for a couple of fly boxes. I think I found myself with three of varying size in the front. Two zingers and small side pockets were well thought out.

The back compartments had plenty of room for my camera, rain gear, and an extra fly box or two. Most importantly I could unbuckle the side straps and spin the pack around to get to these items. I used to pull my arm out of its socket trying to get my camera in the old vest.

I found the pack very comfortable even in the warm months and easy to move around. Casting is much easier now. What has worked best is the convenience of all my essential flies and gear right in front of me easily zipped up and secure.

Pro's: Comfort and convenience
Con's: Design of mesh separator

Update from William Joseph
The 2011 Confluence Pack will be continued with a few minor upgrades. Mostly the front pockets will have new earth magnets holding the pockets together instead of the zippers. Pretty cool!
  Send article

Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 08/19/2010 (2047 reads)
Executive Director Arway to speak on Marcellus Shale drilling
Are you concerned about about the environmental impacts Marcellus Shale drilling is having on Pennsylvania's aquatic resources?

Join Fish and Boat Commission Executive Director John Arway on Monday, August 23 where he will appear on the live radio call-in program Radio Smart Talk from 9 - 10 a.m.

The program will air on Harrisburg’s WITF 89.5 FM and may also be viewed and heard statewide at www.witf.org/news/smart-talk. Listeners may submit questions via e-mail at smarttalk@witf.org or telephone at 800-729-7532.
  Send article

Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 08/13/2010 (2663 reads)
Warm Water Mini JAM August 7, 2010
Combined canoe/kayak float and wading trip on the Juniata River.
Thompsontown to Millerstown, PA.
Video provided by Skybay

  Send article

Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 08/03/2010 (1491 reads)
Attention PAFF Team WWI (warm water insurgents Let's get together for some warm water FFing. On Sat, 7 Aug we'll team up for a float/wade trip on the Juniata River - target smallmouth bass and muskellunge. I think a mini Jam in August ought to fit in between the trico Jam and presumably a steel Jam in the fall (so many Jams - so little time).

This will be a combined float and wading trip. If you have a canoe, johnboat, or kayak by all means consider bringing it. When we get the group together we'll see if there are additional spaces in boats and how to pair up. Those without boat opportunities will have ample wading opportunities at both the start or end points of the float (or anywhere else they care to fish on the river).

We'll meet at the PFBC boatramp at Thompsontown at noontime and float downriver to Millerstown, about 5 miles and finish the day at dusk. Big WW rivers in PA usually fish best in the evenings during high summer. If you're new to bass fishing I'd be happy to provide some tips and check your rigging at the boatramp when we link up as well as suggest some locations if you wish to drive up or downriver and wade.

If you've never fished it, the Juniata is a very scenic river with nothing more than Class I riffles that might require a bit of dragging if the water is low in the area we're fishing. Wade fishing is easy although I recommend felt soles or cleats (skip the cleats if you hope to fish from a boat). The river is roughly about 100 yards wide with an average depth of about 1 foot dropping to several feet in some of the deeper holes. The bottom is mostly cobble and ledge rock with river grass islands. Thompsontown is off RT 22/322 between State College and Harrisburg. (Note: the PFBC boat ramps require that canoes/kayaks be registered or have a launch permit sticker - and of course don't forget a PFD and an extra if you've got one).

You can fish with trout tackle but I'd recommend a 7 or 8WT rod (or bigger if you want to target muskies specifically). Poppers and Wooly Buggers will cover most of the bases. The SMB population in this part of the J is somewhat lower than the glory days back in the 1990s but it's still good with good numbers of big fish over 15 inches.

More details on the forum: http://bit.ly/cbuhGT
  Send article

Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 07/20/2010 (1996 reads)
Last October I received an interesting email from someone in Hollywood. I took notice to this as I don't get many emails from Tinsel Town as most of my posse is right coast based.

Could it be they were looking to shoot a River Runs through It II and the wanted a young fresh face to help consult? Man I would love to go out west again. Maybe they were coming East to shoot the Bridges of Lancaster County with Clint Eastwood as he fished Donegal Creek and needed someone to guide the man with no name around? Big fan of Clint movies. All very novel ideas, but my youth and talent are more likely found in faded pictures than than on the credits of some blockbuster movie.

Interestingly, they did want my approval for the use of the of the Paflyfish website in a scene for an action movie. Makes sense to me because what can be riveting than a sulphur hatch on a stream or a spot burn debate in the forum?

As it turns out director Simon West is shooting The Mechanic which is based on the old 1972 version of the movie by the same name with Charles Bronson. Jason Statham and Donald Sutherland are in this new action-thriller centered on an assassin and his apprentice.

Somehow during the movie they will be chasing some bad guy, probably someone who spot burned a stream, and wind up doing research on Paflyfish to track this guy down.

I honestly think the chances of the website being mentioned or shown in the movie are as remote as me fishing with Clint Eastwood, but it sounds fun. And who knows this may just be some new marketing stunt for movie companies to approach hundreds of blogs and websites teasing they with fame for a blog post like this.

Movie due in December 2010. See you on the cutting from floor!

  Send article

Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 07/14/2010 (1664 reads)
The Internet seems to have a never ending supply of material to gander at and digest. Some of my favorite fly fishing blogs should not be overlooked this summer.

tomThe Trout Underground
Tom Chandler has built his fly fishing blog around the conversation with a less than serious approach to the sport. His casual, but candid dialog really gets back to the heart of what the sport is all about. My favorite line from Tom is, "The fly fishers who have the most fun are those who approach it like they were kids." Plus I admire him because he as more people following him on Twitter than me.

AlexFat Guy Fly Fishing
The site name pretty much says it all. Alex, Kyle and Aaron all post a variety of funny topical articles about fly fishing from all over the country. Alex adds some pretty damn impressive photography. I speak very highly of the site because they make me laugh and it looks like they could probably kick my butt if I said anything differently.

chumMoldy Chum
These posts are some of the best and most pleasing to look at on the Internet. Moldy chum finds the best pictures and photographs to visualize their blog posts. More pictures and less words especially when there is a Friday Pinup involved.


Thanks guys!
  Send article

Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 07/07/2010 (5587 reads)
The USGS has been sharing a very cool and useful online database for many years that provides real-time stream flow conditions for many years. This web-based system provides timely details for many streams across the country with almost hourly updates being sent from radio and satellite transmissions to the USGS Water Watch web site.

rtextA truly invaluable tool for me and has helped determined many a trip especially during heavy spring rains.

The U.S. Geological Survey WaterAlert service now can send e-mail or text messages from the system. The WaterAlert system is supported through the USGS Cooperative Water Program, the USGS National Streamflow Information Program, and by USGS data-collection partners.

Real-time data from USGS gages are transmitted via satellite or other ways to USGS offices at various intervals; in most cases, once every 1 or 4 hours. Emergency transmissions, such as during floods, may be more frequent. Notifications will be based on the data received at these site-dependent intervals.

Thanks Bruno for the scoop.
  Send article

Published by Heritage-Angler on 06/28/2010 (1260 reads)
All PAFF members, family, and friends are cordially invited to join us for the 2010 SE PA Trico Mini-Jam on the Little Lehigh.

This event will be held on Sunday, July 4 at 7AM.

Due to the nature of fishing the Trico spinner fall, and the desire of many members to have a "mini Jam" that they don't have to make a multi-day committment to, a central location in the state (ie. Spring Creek) was deemed impractical. Therefore, the event will be held on the banks of the Little Lehigh, providing good access to anglers from two of the three largest metropolitan areas in the state.

We'll meet in the parking lot off of Park Rd at 7AM, and there should be plenty of room for everyone to fish. Weather is always a crap shoot, but we could use the rain that this event seems to bring on.

For those members that have never fished a Trico spinnerfall before - we'll try to pair you up with an experienced fisherman to help you out.

Waders are a good idea, but wet wading is an option (if you can stand the cold water). I'll have a case of spring water on ice in my truck, but it would be a good idea to carry some with you. Alcoholic beverages are not permitted in the Allentown Parkway system.

After the fishing and inevitable BS session, we'll be heading out to do lunch, and BS some more. The early start time should allow attendees to still get home in time for their Independence Day picnics.

No sign up required - just show up by 7AM.

Forum post and directions: http://www.paflyfish.com/modules/newb ... p?topic_id=14178&forum=11
  Send article

Published by David Weaver [Fishidiot] on 06/22/2010 (3021 reads)
Continued from Part 1

Some years prior to this bloody drama, likely in the summer of 1853, railroad workers on the Baltimore and Ohio railroad gathered some smallmouth bass from somewhere in the fish’s native range in the Ohio River basin. According to some accounts, these fish were placed in water buckets near Pittsburgh, taken eastward by train, and eventually released in the upper Potomac near Cumberland, several dozen miles upriver from Harper’s Ferry.

rusty spinnerToday such introduction of non-native species, frowned on as it is, wouldn’t be considered beneficial and the new invaders would likely be targeted for eradication, much as the “snakehead” fish are targeted today in the lower, tidal reaches of the river where they have been illegally introduced in recent years. In the Nineteenth Century, however, a different ethic prevailed and in the case of smallmouth bass the long term results have been positive. Like the striped bass, the range of the smallmouth followed the expansion of the railroads and we fly rodders are better off for it. Although relatively slow growers (an eighteen inch river smallie is typically eight to twelve years old in this part of the country) the newly introduced bass spread rapidly through the Potomac River system, finding the habitat much to their liking.

The State of Maryland actually owns the entire width of the Potomac River but in the Harper’s Ferry area, license reciprocity is in effect and you can use a Maryland license along the Virginia and West Virginia shores. While drift boat fishing is popular in this area and some excellent local guides can show you a great day, I like wade fishing with a fly rod. The habitat around Harper’s Ferry is ideal for the foot bound angler, although finding parking areas can be difficult in the immediate area around town. The National Park Service has a shuttle into Harper’s Ferry for a few dollars, well worth it to see the old town. Another National Park, C&O Canal, borders much of the Maryland shore and a foot path follows the river allowing for good access to hikers and bicyclists. Be careful on the steep bank along the canal, especially if you’re sensitive to poison ivy. The summer months are best for the wading angler due to consistent lower flows although there are a lot of folks tubing and rafting the river below the town when the weather is hot. Most of the “rubber hatch” is off the river in the prime fishing hours of morning and evening and, in any case, the river is big enough that there’s room for everybody during mid-day. Fall is great too with beautiful scenery and cooler temps put the bass on the feed and they’re very aggressive.

Boulder and ledge rock dominates the Potomac and Shenandoah River channels where they cut through the narrow mountain passes creating an enticing diversity of riffles, pools, pocket water, and runs. I wouldn’t consider wading here without felt soles and a wading staff. The smallies are everywhere. During the summer season the wading fly fisherman can effectively target smallmouths virtually anywhere in the river with boulders or rocky cover being prime locations. Larger bass frequently hold in the cushion of water in front of larger boulders. A popper or deer hair surface fly will often get hammered in front of boulders or ledge rock running perpendicular to the current. Gear needn’t be complicated: in addition to the felt soles and wading staff, a chest pack or vest and 7WT fly rod with floating line does the trick. In the cooler months you’ll need chest waders. I like to keep a camera in a zip-loc bag.

rusty spinnerPotomac River bass usually aren’t selective and run-of-the-mill flies should cover the bases. Poppers in yellow and white are dependable and I like dark colored nymphs roughly an inch long with rubber legs for dead drifting under a large strike indicator. Crayfish patterns work well dead drifted too. Clouser Minnows and Woolly Buggers in various colors should round out your fly box.

While there have been reports in recent years of bass in the Potomac showing “intersex” abnormalities, likely from sewage effluent, I have never personally seen a sickly fish in the this river, an observation I can’t make for other rivers in the mid-Atlantic region. The bass are healthy and usually fat off the abundant forage which includes schools of shiners as well as crayfish, madtoms, juvenile catfish, and sunnies. The riffle areas have some very large hellgrammites. During evenings in summer there is also a white fly hatch that can bring up good numbers of fish too.

While a fly fishermen has a shot at trophy sized fish, most Potomac smallies average under a foot in length. The 2005 year class was particularly strong and these bass now comprise a large segment of the population. Recent years have seen very good spawning, especially in 2007, ensuring good bass fishing for the next decade. I consider a fifteen inch fly caught river smallmouth a trophy but bigger fish are there and savvy local bait fishermen take bass over 20 inches and four pounds around Harper’s Ferry every year. My hope is that Maryland will, sometime in the future, extend the catch and release regulations that currently exist upriver, further downstream to Harper’s Ferry to protect these large, very old spawners.

In recent years, another fish from the smallmouth’s original range has taken up residence in the Potomac around Harper’s Ferry: the muskellunge. While rarely targeted by fly fishermen, muskies are common in deeper pools and near feeder creeks and will take a streamer, especially during the colder months of the year. Although Maryland has stocked tiger muskies, how the pure strain fish got in the Potomac is something of a mystery but they are spawning and the river has become a first class musky river. Channel cats, walleyes, rock bass, and redbreast sunfish round out the fly fishermen’s quarry and can save those rare days when the bass aren’t cooperative.

rusty spinnerWith John Brown captured, many Southerners felt that the old crusader would meet a swift and ignominious hanging. Yet, with time, many Northerners came to see the man as the living embodiment of the struggle against slavery and his impending execution a martyrdom. Ralph Waldo Emerson described him in Christ like terms. Frederick Douglas compared his own anti-slavery activities to Brown’s raid on Harper’s Ferry as being a mere “candle” compared to the “burning sun.” Brown’s dignity and unapologetic commitment to his cause was unwavering during his captivity and when he was led to the gallows in nearby Charles Town on December 2nd he held his head high with pride, steadfast in his belief that he’d done God’s work. Church bells rang across the North that day – an ominous toll to Southerners that their differences with the rest of the country were irreconcilable.

Hours before his death, Brown issued his now legendary, and ultimately prescient, prediction that “the sins of this guilty land can never be purged but with blood.” A year later, Abraham Lincoln was elected. John Brown’s raid had been another step toward war, maybe the most important one in steeling the resolve of Americans to dispense with compromise and regard their neighbor as irredeemable. Had John Brown been a fisherman, he might have gone to Harper’s Ferry for a different pursuit.

Prominent Southerners attended the execution and when the deed was done the pro-slavery crowd broke up and folks headed home, unable to know the impending catastrophe the country would soon be embroiled in. They rode off in carriages and trains and as they passed the river, rumbling over the bridge in a cloud of dust, down in the river below, in the cushion of water in front of a giant boulder, was a smallmouth bass. All muscle, fin, and scale, the predator carefully scrutinized the surface and water column to his front, watching… and ready.
  Send article

RSS Feed



Site Content
Sponsors
Stay Connected

twitterfeed.com facebook instagram RSS Feed

Polls
Will you be steelhead fishing this season?
Yes
No
Uncertain
_PL_TOTALVOTES
The poll will close at 2016/10/10 12:50
3 Comments





Copyright 2016 by PaFlyFish.com | Privacy Policy| Provided by Kile Media Group | Design by 7dana.com