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Update from the PFBC Big Spring Meeting

Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 2014/1/8 (2012 reads)
The Fly Rod Chronicles is a program I have been enjoying on the Outdoor Channel for a number of years. Curtis Fleming and crew travel the country sharing their fly fishing pursuits like no others. In early May of 2013 the show made it's way back home to West Virginia for the Harman's North Fork Invitational 2013. The event offers two-man fly fishing teams a chance to compete for first place on the North Fork of the South Branch River in West Virginia.

Fly Rod Chronicles
The Fly Rod Chronicles at the Harman's North Fork Invitational 2013


Some really top notch anglers get together for this event and Todd Harman was on me for a couple of years about getting a Paflyfish team going for the Invitational. Since Paflyfish has some pretty darn good anglers I figured it wouldn't be too hard to get a competitive team in place. With all the talent I see at a Paflyfish Jamboree I was more concerned about just fielding a team that could wake up for the first session.

As it turned out the short straws went to Shane "Sbecker" Becker and Phil "PhilC" Chadbourn to represent Team Paflyfish at the competition Shane had been to Harman's the year before, which offered him some advantage for the team. Before leaving I asked the guys to just have fun and do their best. I felt like I was sending my kids off to college and almost digressed into warning them about not getting into any trouble.

The North Fork does not support naturally reproducing trout and Todd Harman, Harman's Invitational host, makes sure the stream is always stocked with some awesome looking trout.

Not having been in any fly fishing competitions myself, I had to get familiar with how the Invitational worked. Basically, sixteen teams competed over two days during three sessions of fly fishing. Each team had two sessions on Friday and one on Saturday. Points were accrued by the total length in centimeters of trout over the three sessions. Each team was allowed to land up to seven fish during a session. The best eight teams then duked it out for one final session with the winner being selected based on those points from that last session. There was some strategy that each team needed to make with picking the section of streams or beat for the session. Higher scoring teams got the early picks on their preferred beats.

Harman's North Fork Invitational
Shane at the Harman's North Fork Invitational


The guys headed off Thursday for the weekend and I waited for snippets of emails for updates on their progress.

[Spoiler Alert]
I got a short email late on Friday of first day from Phil cautiously offering up they had a lot of fishing yet to do, but they were in first place. Phil must have figured I would think this was some sort of hoax and Shane shortly followed with an email validating that they were ahead after the first two sessions. Phil managed to land one of the biggest trout of all the competitors that first day. It was great to read their excitement and was much better news than the bail thing that was still itching in the back of my head.

A mid-day email from the duo on Saturday was a little less encouraging. Day two Team Paflyfish presented some new challenges in the third session as they were only allowed to use two flies. That morning was not as productive and they fell back to third overall. This still put them into the finals and they had the third pick of the stream beat.

I didn't hear anymore from them until much later that night. I got a text photo of a poorly lit image from Shane that had some darkened red, white and blue looking thing. My guess was they didn't do so well and moved onto some Pabst Blue Ribbons. A more detailed email arrived later sharing that the guys ended having a really good day. They offered it would have been better if they could have landed a bunch of big rainbows that they missed getting into their nets, but the final message was, "We got it"! Much to their own surprise, Shane and Phil pulled it off by taking first place at the Invitational.

Fly Fishing Competition
The Surprised Winners


"It was just awesome. We had a great time and I never thought that we would win. I just didn't want to come in last and holy cow we won the thing," said Shane. Phil added, "It was a really good time and enjoyed hanging with Curtis and crew."

Curtis later shared with me, "Phil & Shane are class-act and represented Team Paflyfish in high regards. They were a blast to hang out with and very good fly fishermen."

Catch all the fun of the weekend, including Shane and Phil of Team Paflyfish as they take on some of the best anglers from all over the country at the Harman's Invitational 2013 on the Fly Fishing Chronicles. Shows air on the Outdoor Channel starting Monday, January 13th at 11:00 am, Friday, January 17th at 7:00 am and 12:00 pm. A final program will be aired on Saturday, January 18th at 5:30 pm.

Harman's Luxury Log Cabins is a sponsor of Paflyfish. The North Fork does not support naturally reproducing trout and is stocked by Harman's along 1 3/4 miles of water providing anglers with the opportunity to fish for rainbows, browns, brookies, tiger and golden trout. A great place to relax with friends, family and for in some awesome trout fishing.

Photos provided by PhilC and Shane.








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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 2014/1/2 (792 reads)
In an attempt to get just one more day in fly fishing for 2013, Afishinado, Fishidiot and I made our way over to central Pennsylvania on Monday. A cold wintery day, but to be expected for the end of December.

Letort Spring Creek
Dave Weaver Stalking on Letort Spring Creek


A heavy rain hit the region the day before. Many of the limestone and smaller streams were cleared up and fishable. It was still very cloudy and temperatures held in the upper 30's all day.

We found our way over to the Letort in hopes of a Blue Winged Olive (BWO) hatch mid day or early afternoon. It is pretty common on cloudy, mild winter days to find a sporadic BWO hatch getting the attention of the locals.

Letort Spring Creek


Winter fly fishing can be very difficult. Cold weather and less active trout can make for some real hit or miss fishing. For the Letort and the wild brown trout in the stream the best approach is nymphing with the hope that some risers are out on midges or BWO's. The high streamside vegetation that so strongly dominates everything along the stream in the summer is gone and it is easier casting if you are lucky enough to try some dry flies.

Letort Spring Creek
Afishinado Putting on a Nymphing Clinic


Afishinado managed to get some action with nymphs. I did see a few risers and tried a midge with my usual "no luck".

There were some small BWO's sailing down the stream, but not a lot of active fish rising to them. What was more interesting was our observation of what look liked a #16 sulphur mayfly that was hatching during that same time. We were pretty taken aback to see a few little orangish mayflies floating past us in the middle of winter.

BWO on Letort


A fun day out and glad we could fit in one more final day in for 2013.








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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 2013/12/27 (598 reads)
Hank's in Missoula Montana sharing some fishing stories and browsing gear at a couple local fly shops. Hope you dig it! Snap It!







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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 2013/12/25 (371 reads)
christmas flyfishingAnother fun year on the site and streams. Very thankful to all those who have helped others during the year in learning more about the sport. Looking forward to doing more of the same this year as well. We hope you and your family have a wonderful Christmas and wish you a Happy New Year.

Sincerely,

Paflyfish
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 2013/12/17 (795 reads)
Pennsylvania has gotten hit with some bad news a few times this year about invasive species having a potential negative impaction on some waterways. Earlier in the year we heard about Didymo turning up in Pine Creek and more recently there was news about New Zealand mudsnails in Spring Creek. Fly fishing is a fun casual sport, but more often than not extra precautions will need to be follow with our gear.

Invasive species generally are plants or animals that are non-native (or alien) to the ecosystem and whose introduction causes harm to the native species. New Zealand mud snails have been detrimental in reducing some western streams productivity. Populations can reach 28,000 snails per square foot. This rapid and expansive growth can compete with native species.

New Zealand mudsnails“Based on studies conducted in western U.S. streams, if the population grows quickly, they could become the dominant organisms in the benthic – or bottom dwelling – community, upon which many others species depend for food,” said Bob Morgan, the PFBC’s ecologist who studies aquatic invasive species. “Because this is the first known occurrence of the New Zealand mudsnail on the Atlantic slope of the eastern U.S, the effects of the snail on higher organisms, such as fish, are not certain at this time.”

Fly fishing anglers will need to take extra precautions in cleaning their gear before leaving Spring Creek and entering another waterway. This is a serious issue without proper measures the situation could get worse in the region.

From the PFBC below and Clean Your Gear:
"New Zealand mudsnails require some specialized disinfection measures. Gear should be visually inspected and any clinging matter should be removed and disposed of in the trash. To kill mudsnails, three methods are effective. Gear can be frozen for a minimum of six hours, or it can be soaked in hot water - 120°F to 140°F - for five minutes. This last method is not recommended for Gortex.

Also, a 2005 study by the California Department of Fish and Game showed that mudsnails can be killed by soaking gear for five minutes in a one-to-one solution of Formula 409® Cleaner Degreaser Disinfectant and water. After soaking gear for five minutes, thoroughly rinse it with plain water. Simply spraying gear with the disinfectant or the mixture does not work. Also, general cleaners have not been shown to be effective against the mudsnail." [see note below]1

These steps in keeping your gear clean are not going to work very well if you are planning to go from Spring Creek and then say Penns Creek in the same day. It has been suggested in the forum that if you spend a lot of time in the Central Pennsylvania area fly fishing and jump from stream to stream frequently, an extra pair of old boots for just Spring Creek may be the way to go for now.

Whatever your plans may be to fish in the region, keep yourself education on these invasive species and take the necessary steps to protect the streams you and many others like to fly fish.

1 Side Note:
There seems to be some conflicting information about the success of using Formula 409® Cleaner Degreaser Disinfectant and water to kill New Zealand mudsnails. Here is the 2005 PDF study by the California Department of Fish and Game and the several sources are reporting that 409 doesn't work. So go figure there is conflict.

So to help I have found another site that offers a few more suggestions on how to deal with eliminating the snails on your gear here. Options look like freezing, completely drying, Copper Sulfate Pentahydrate (which has it's own debate) or my suggestion...buy a set of inexpensive extra gear for Spring Creek.

Sorry about what I thought was serious problem had a simple solution. Wrong again!










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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 2013/12/10 (961 reads)
The Paflyfish Spring Jamboree is the annual spring meet-up when members from the site get together to fly fish, tie flies, camp and share a few stories. We have folks coming from Ohio, New York, New Jersey, Maryland and Florida. We have a lot of fun fishing over some of Pennsylvania's finest streams including Penns Creek, Spring Creek, Little Juniata River (Little J), Fishing Creek and plenty more in the region.

Fly Fishing Pennsylvania
Csoult and BikerFish hanging at Penns Creek


This year is no exception and members from the forum are making plans to meet the weekend of May 16-18, 2014 at Seven Mountains Campground in Spring Mills, Pennsylvania. Please contact them if you would like to stay there that weekend. They have a limited number of cabins and campsites.

I am hoping to plan more activities specific to new fly fishing anglers. I am working on casting lessons, fly tying and even a few trips out on to some of the waters in the area. There are a lot of members on the site that will informally help folks out not familiar with the area. Just check the forums and don't be afraid to ask for some help.

fly fishing Penns creek
Maurice and Fishidiot on the Little J


The pavilion is rented by Paflyfish and is used as a meeting point during the weekend. Plenty of impromptu conversations, fly tying and meet-ups all take place.

Friday, May 16th
Jam attendees often start arriving throughout the day if they haven't arrived earlier in the week. Stop by after 3:00PM to help or meet others trying to get back out on the water before dark.

Saturday, May 17th
Coffee 6-9am available at the pavilion

Saturday morning we will likely arrange for some of the beginner programs.

Fire Ring at the pavilion around dark. Will will be working on some more plans like a chili cook-off and other evening activities. Quiet hours may be a factor.

Sunday, May 18th
Coffee 6-9am available at the pavilion.

In addition to the expected fly fishing opportunities; authors, fly shop owners, and other experts are usually in attendance and provide a lot of great knowledge at the evening gatherings. Follow the latest details in the forum here.

night fly fishing
Afish night fly fishing on Penns Creek


I'll run and updated post with details this spring.






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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 2013/11/28 (1294 reads)
Some great fly fishing deals can be found this time of year and several of our sponsors have provided offers for members on Paflyfish starting today. Be sure to check these deals out while the offers last.

GPS Fishing Guide to Pennsylvania
ON SALE - Thanksgiving Day thru Cyber Monday
Regular Price - $24.99
Sale Price - $12.99
Both iPhone & Android Apps are on Sale

Montana Angler Fly Fishing
Book any multi-day fishing package with Montana Angler by December 7th and receive $50 off. Package must include a minimum of 3 nights lodging. Mention Paflyfish and contact Brian at brian@montanaangler.com or 406.570.0453. Visit our website here.

Risen Fly
Black Friday and Cyber Monday Sale! Deals found here
Take 25% off on EVERYTHING with code “blackfriday” on Friday and “cybermonday” on Monday.
Win a FREE Ichthus reel
If we get a total of 25 orders on EACH DAY we will give away a FREE Ichthus reel to those who made purchases from our site those days. So there are 2 FREE reels up for grabs.
The more you spend the more entries you get to win.
Spend $1-$50 and get 1 entry
Spend $50.01-$100 and get 2 entries
Spend $100.01-$150 and get 3 entries

Shadow Fly Fishing
Deals found here
• 20% off all Shadow 5wt models + 2 free packs of hooks with your order over a $60 value on both rod models
• buy 3 packs of hooks get 3 free a $30 value
• 25 dollars off the shadow warrior 9ft 7wt


Trident Fly Fishing
Deals found here
20% off on Fly Lines, Fly Selections
15% off Sale items (for a whopping 35% off!)
15% off leaders and tippet
Some great deals include - Lamson Lightspeed for $195
There will be more deals throughout the weekend.
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 2013/11/25 (471 reads)
Personally this year has been challenging one for me and have a lot to be thankful for. Paflyfish is always a good place for me to get myself grounded. Contributions by so many on the site make it a very successfully community.

After eighteen years, Paflyfish has a lot to be thankful for and the moderators lead in those efforts. Maurice, JackM, Fishidiot and Afishinado contribute in so many ways, most are never seen by the site. Their contributions go way beyond fixing posts, handling disputes or cleaning up a few skirmishes that ensue on occasion. They provide a lot guidance and important community direction that helps make sure things running smoothly.

There are a lot of other folks on the site that share their time to help out others learn more about fly fishing. Giving back comes in many forms including: conservation efforts, political involvement, teaching new anglers or volunteering with programs like Wounded Warriors. My friends Ron and Greg dragged me all over Northern Pennsylvania for years as I floundered figuring out what fly fishing was all about. Their patience and coaching really helped me develop an interest in the sport and is what inspired me to create the web site.

Many readily give back and contribute to the site. I really want to thank Heritage Angler for his efforts putting together the PAFF Eastern PA Fly Tying Jamboree and PAFF Instructional Jamboree. Both of these events focus on helping new anglers learn more about the fundamentals of fly fishing. Plenty of others including: Frederick, Fishidiot, Foxgap239, The_Sasquatch and Krayfish put together a variety of jams all over the region that invite new fly fishing anglers to the sport.

I am always blown away with members like Csoult and his support of the site as he donated of the beautiful hand-made wooden rod cases at this years Spring Jam. There are plenty more examples and sorry I am not able to cover them all. Paflyfish gives back as well with support to the Youth Rivers Fly Fishing Camp in 2013 and will be supporting additional worthwhile causes next year too.

As the site has grown over the years and support by sponsors has helped keep our web presence strong and many of our activities going. We are fortunate to have Allen Fly Fishing, Harman's North Fork Cottages, Montana Angler Fly Fishing, Gogal Publishing, Trident Fly Fishing, The Sporting Gentleman, Risen Fly and Shadow Fly Fishing support the site.

I realize there are a lot of places people can spend their time. I want to thank you and those mentioned for contributing to Paflyfish.

Stay Healthy and Happy Thanksgiving!

Dave
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 2013/11/18 (3877 reads)

By Brian McGeehan at Montana Angler Fly Fishing

As the 2013 season winds down many of us put our fishing ambitions on pause until the thaw arrives in spring. For those folks that enjoy blending their travels with their favorite pasting, fall is also a great time to start planning a destination fishing trip for 2014. When Dave Kile asked me to put together a post for planning a Western fly fishing trip I realized it was a pretty broad task so I decided to limit the advice to my home state of Montana (although a lot of these tips can apply to other states as well). Since planning a trip where you are fishing unguided is very different than going with an outfitter part 1 focused on DIY anglers. I make my living helping anglers plan their Montana fishing trips so hopefully this post won’t come across as too much of a sales pitch, but rather a useful guide for planning a guided fishing adventure to the big sky state. Montana is a huge state and there is also a much larger diversity of types of rivers and streams than encountered in the East so teaming up with an experienced outfitter can definitely streamline your trip. Quality Montana fly fishing lodges and outfitters can offer several advantages to out of state anglers: local river knowledge and timing, float fishing access for the larger rivers, private access on ranches and assistance with lodging.

Montana Fly Fishing
Montana Fly Fishing


Most of the folks that email and call us about a trip to Montana don’t know where to begin. The first thing we try to do when someone approaches us bout a possible trip to Montana is to determine what type of trip they are looking for. I generally start by asking about fishing priorities, budget, trip duration, flexibility in dates, lodging preferences, and experience level. The dream trip for one angler can be a frustrating disaster for another so we invest a lot of time into communicating with future clients to try to come up with the best possible plan that will meet all of their expectations. Here are some tips that can help you narrow down your selections of guides and lodges and ensure that the trip you set up has the best chance of meeting your goals and being a success.

Be as specific as you can about your trip constraints
Before you begin surfing the web or contacting different outfitters and lodges take some time to think about your budget, trip length and how much flexibility you have in the time of year you come. For trip duration we think of trips in terms of number of nights and days – for example 6 nights and 5 days. It is also helpful to know if every day is spent with a guide or if some days will be either self guided or left open for other activities such as sight seeing. Even though most lodge trips are presented as packages – they can almost always be customized to modify the number of fishing days. Time of year is also important – some locations are outstanding in spring and fall but are too warm in mid summer and others are best fished in mid summer. Finally, have a rough number of your target budget excluding airfare. Remember that most trips will have some extras that are not included in the package price. These may include shuttles, guide gratuities, meals, alcohol, etc. When communicating with lodges and outfitters make sure to have them provide an estimate of both the costs paid before the trip (most guides and outfitters require full payment before arrival).

Arrange your fishing priorities
Most outfitters in Montana operate on multiple rivers and streams. Time of year also has a great impact on fishing conditions. One of the most important aspects of a successful trip with a guide is to determine what your goals are when fishing. Examples include lots of action, big fish, dry fly fishing, variety in fishing condition, all float fishing, all wade fishing, etc. There is so much variety in the fishing in that it is very helpful for an outfitter to know what you are hoping to achieve on your days on the water. For example mid June can be a great time to flat out catch lots of fish but in some areas the dry fly fishing is not great (except for the spring creeks) because of the higher flows but the nymphing and streamer fishing can be epic. Late summer and early fall can produce great dry fly fishing but it is more technical since flows are lower than early summer so it might be a terrific time for an experience angler but more challenging for a beginner.

Montana Fly Fishing
Guided Montana Fly Fishing

Select a time of year
This is a difficult topic and could really take up an entire post. Different fisheries perform better at different times of the year and how you prefer to fish also factors into the equation. Here is a down and dirty guide to different time windows:
April to Mid May – This is an incredible time for both beginners and expert anglers. There are lots of early season hatches and potential for explosive dry fly fishing. Catch rates tend to be high nymphing as well. The only caveat is that weather and river flows are very dynamic and sometimes can spoil dry fly fishing and you always need to be prepared for a late season “winter” weather event (usually still fishable if you are prepared for weather).

Mid May to mid June – Tailwaters below dams like the Bighorn, Missouri and Beaverhed are popular then and besides these fisheries most out of state anglers avoid the “run off” season. We have come to really love this window and I would make a strong argument that it might actually be the best window for high catch rates and very few anglers as long as you avoid the tailwaters. The Missoula area and Northern Montana are tough during run off with few options but the area Southwest of Montana from the Bighole to the Yellowstone Valley can be amazing with a mix of lesser known tailwaters, private ranches and spring creeks. The only catch is this is not the best time to dry fly fish – but if you want lots of action and big fish it is outstanding.

Mid June to Mid July – This is another amazing time to fish and arguably the best for the most diversity. The tailwaters are still fishing well, spring creeks are at their best with the PMD hatch and the tailwaters are clearing producing great action. This is another great time to catch aquatic hatches like PMDs, Caddis, Salmonflies, Golden Stones and Yellow Sallies (to name a few). This is also the beginning of the busy season but there are still a lot of “off the beaten path” locations that are either permitted, private or just tough spots to get to that can yield amazing fishing with few other anglers but expect to see other boats on some of the famous blue ribbon rivers you see in the books (although not really crowded by Eastern standards with a handful of exceptions). All in all this is very safe window to plan a trip with good weather and great fishing.

Mid July to Early August – Although trout on the big public rivers have seen some flies, this is still a great time to fish and also a good time to target if you really want to throw dries. Mid June to Early July can still have pretty heavy flows if it is a big snow year and you might need to toss big ugly nymphs (with exceptions like spring creeks) on those years but even on a big water year dry fly fishing is always an option by mid July. This is also a great time to wade fish smaller ranch streams and the backcountry.

August – The big blue ribbon rivers on most years start to get tougher in August – fish have just seen a lot of flies by then. They can still be good and shouldn’t be discounted but it isn’t always peak catch rates then. This is a great time to target back country streams, private ranch waters and any other areas that see less pressure. Hopper fishing is at its peak in the late summer but you just have to work harder to get away from more popular floats. When planning a trip in August definitely make sure to ask the outfitter what the options are and how much pressure are on these rivers then. If they are just planning on fishing big public waters with you every day you might ask about other options.

September – Fishing pressure drops dramatically once kids go back to school in late August. September weather is ideal and hopper fishing is still very good. Several rivers like the Lower Madison, Lower Gallatin, Upper Missouri, Jefferson and a few others that were too warm to fish successfully in the mid summer months (they are lower elevation) wake back up to produce some very good fishing to trout that haven’t seen flies in several months. Other rivers also pick back up as soon as the pressure drops off and fishing can be really good. The flows are now at base line so the fishing is a little more technical and the trout are a touch spookier so having at least some fishing experience is more important than spring and early summer.

October – This is a favorite time for our guides. Pressure is almost non existent on most waters and the fishing really gets good. Dry fly fishing can be outstanding on cloudy days over the fall baetis hatch both on big rivers and spring creeks. Huge brown trout move out of lakes and into the rivers and streams that feed them and this is probably the best time of year to catch trophy fish over 23”. Weather is generally dry and very nice in October but you do have to be prepared for the possibility of an early cold front that can push temps down.

Fly Fishing Madison River
Fly Fishing on the Madison River

Decide what type of lodging you want
Once we decide the best time of year for our guests based on fishing priorities and their available windows for a vacation we spend a lot of time reviewing lodging options with folks. Most days you are only on the water for about 8 hours or so which leaves a lot of time spent at your accommodations so planning where you will stay is a big part of your vacation.
Fishing Lodges – Lodges typically offer an all inclusive or mostly inclusive package that includes meals and rooms with a lot of character in beautiful locations along rivers. Lodges are also the most expensive way to go but many folks enjoy the idea of “fish, eat, relax”. Not all lodges are the same so you need to make sure you find the right match. Some lodges aren’t truly “fishing lodges” even if they market themselves that way so ask if all of the guests are fisherman. If you are planning a mixed trip with other activities like riding horses or touring Yellowstone a general lodge might be just right but if you are fishing every day I think it is nice to go to a lodge where all of the other guests are anglers. Also ask about the fishing variety – do you fish just one river or a variety. Finally ask about the “extras” – often shuttles, taxes, lodge gratuities, staff gratuities and sometimes alcohol can all be extra but most lodge managers can give you an estimate of those.

Hotels – Usually you can access the same fisheries from a hotel that you can from a lodge. If you have a tight budget it is hard to beat a hotel package. Hotels also give you some freedom to experience local towns and go out to different restaurants in the evening.

Vacation Rentals – There are lots of nice vacation homes and cabins that can be rented so this can be a great option if you like to prepare your own meals. Some of the nicest rentals go very early so plan to book as soon as you can (early winter at the latest) – especially if you have a big group and need a larger house.

Camping – A few outfitters offer river camping trips and there are also several outfitters that offer backcountry pack trips. The guides on river camping trips are usually the same guides that you would get on day trips – highly professional and experienced. On river camping trips your camp is moved each day while you fish and you roll into camp with everything set up and dinner already cooking. On pack trips make sure to ask about the “fishing experience” of the guides. Many pack outfitters higher younger guides and the pay is much, much less than river guides that are usually career guides. Many back country guides are young guys in their early 20s that are amazing with horses but their idea of guiding is pointing and saying “there are fish in that crick”. If you are an accomplished angler you probably don’t need to much on stream coaching but if you have some novices in your group make sure you carefully select an outfitter that has “real” fishing guides.

Fly Fishing Madison River


Book early
The quality of your guide can make a huge difference in your enjoyment level of your trip. Top guides often book their return clients a year in advance and by early winter are mostly booked for the season. There are always younger and less experienced guides open even a week in advance but to get the crème de la crème you should book as soon as you can nail down dates. Fall is a great time to plan and usually there are still good guides and lodge options even into February but for peak season dates things go very fast.

This is part 2 in the Brain's post Where to Fly Fish in Montana? Part one - A DIY Trip Guide can be found here.

Brian McGeehan is a Pennsylvania native and has been guiding Western rivers in Montana, Wyoming and Colorado for 19 seasons. He is a licensed Montana outfitter and owner of Montana Angler Fly Fishing based in Bozeman, MT.








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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 2013/11/12 (905 reads)
I was anxious to squeeze a little more fly fishing this fall and pleaded with Maurice to give up on his leaf raking plans to join me. Both our teams in the NFL have been doing pretty poorly, so giving up honey-do's and another anticipated butt-kicking was an easy call.

Fall Fly Fishing
Fall Fly Fishing

We met up at one of our secret favorite dirty fly fishing streams in York County and made our way upstream about mid-morning. The stream was stocked last month and even in the flat water along the banks there we a few trout hanging about. A large amount of rain last month also drove a good conversation about where fish go during a flood. We both agreed it all depends of they were wild or if they were recently stock.

The bright sun was a helpful in raising the air temps up to about 57 degrees. The water was very low and gin clear at 44 degrees.

Maurice quickly uncovered a pod of trout between a stretch of rocks about 20 feet long. Finding the trout and quietly moving into position when the water is so low and clear is critical.

After a very serious discussion on red hots, weenies, bead heads, zebra midges and walt's worms we snuck in fairly close. The wind helped reduce the surface visibility and allowed us to get in without spooking the trout. One of the few times a little bit wind is helpful when you are fly fishing.

Rainbow Trout
Something from the PFBC

Maurice then did his usual thing of catching fish and I did mine thing of taking photos of him catching fish.

We made are way upstream taking our time to cautiously spot the trout and quietly approach holes along the way. Most of the trout we saw were sitting back a few feet from the rocks, not moving too much, but easily skittish if we moved in too quickly even from about 25' away. Polarized lenses were a must and even then a trained eye was helpful spotting the trout.

Wild Trout
Something a little wild

With the water being so cold and the trout were hanging on the bottom, it was really necessary to get our flies down deep. We are kept in our strike indicators about 5'- 8' off the flies with a little bit a split shot. Even in what seemed like very low water conditions many of the holes were still very deep.

Fly Fishing
Sneak Attack

We even hooked into a couple of trout at a few spots that I normally would have overlooked. Maurice is always really good about reminding me of the things that are right in front of me.

At this point in the season you never know how many days you have left to fly fish. Been a bit of challenging year for me personally, so getting some time on the water with Maurice was very much appreciated especially when he remembered to bring the beer when we got back to the trucks.








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