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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 05/02/2011 (4584 reads)

Meet the Hendricksons from Tightline Productions on Vimeo.


I caught up with Tim Flagler at Tightline Productions about his recent Hendricksons video. I couldn't help but post this right away as the macro video on this is awesome. Tim shared with me that he started with this video about two years ago and took quite a bit of effort to produce. Much of it was completed in fish tanks to get the best light and control of the environment.

Tim collected Hendrickson nymphs and duns from the South Branch of the Raritan River near Califon, NJ. Tim does not claim to be an entomologist, but is pretty certain that these are all Hendricksons (Ephemerella subvaria).

Great details and nice job.

Tim Flagler can be contacted through the company website at Tightline Productions.
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 04/26/2011 (2062 reads)
This past winter the Fly Fishing Show exhibit floor in Somerset was already getting busy the first day and the my friend Keith Torok encouraged me to join as he wanted to hear Gary Borger's lecture. I have enjoyed some of Gary's books, but I never had a chance to see one of his seminars. So we darted over to the DoubleTree and got situated just as Gary got started.

jGary BorgerGary began by elaborating on the many different rise forms, trout feeding behavior and carried the seminar with a determined conversation that really intrigued me. It was interesting to hear some of his ideas that I knew I was overlooking on the water sometimes. The list of my mistakes seems to grow daily.

He shared a little more about his book "Fishing the Film" that he just released. I definitely needed to get some more info on his book.

Gary is very well known for his previous five best-selling fly fishing books, writings for numerous magazine's, consultation on “A River Runs Through It” and numerous awards. Honestly his accomplishments could fill up one of my blog posts.

He was busy traveling to Louisiana and points south fly fishing for red fish and drums. Seems like most of the cool people in the fly fishing industry head south for some part of the winter. I was pretty busy too sharping my streamer hooks (yippee) and shoveling some late winter snow, but we were finally able to find some time in March.

We got caught up in some of the things that got him started and keeps him so excited about the sport. He was quick to share one of his most memorable experience when he caught his first trout on a Leadwing Coachman as a boy of 12 growing up in Pennsylvania.

Our conversation then moved into his enjoyment when he is fly fishing in New Zealand. You could hear his excitement in just the mention of the heading to that region. He commented, "It is the opportunity to hunt and target the trout in those waters that makes it so good." You could really tell this kind of fishing had special meaning as he elaborated on the fun in going after the big 24" trout that are so common on the South Island.

Some of his travels to New Zealand and other locations helped inspire Gary his current writing project. He is working on a series of upcoming books he hopes will cover all aspects of fly fishing.

This was something that started for him over ten years ago. The original hope was to have all the big names cover a subject in a book proving a complete fly fishing series. Gary imagined himself more as the editor, but as time went by and lucky for us he found himself starting the series himself.

In the next part of this post I will share more about "Fishing the Film" and Gary's upcoming plans for the remaining series.

You can find out more about Gary Borger at his blog.
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 04/20/2011 (4955 reads)
So we are here now?

When I first saw this press release I thought the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC) was offering scratch-offs at Cabela's. Seriously “Wanna' Go Fishing for Millions?” is this the same agency that promotes the Hollywood Casino?

jaws flyfishingNow I know fishing derbies have been around for a long time. There are many news stories of fishing contests in the 1800's. This is well before scratch-offs.

The more recent derbies in the U.S. have been set up for kids. Many are sponsored by local governments or sportsman clubs to raise awareness for fishing. I was at a derby a couple years ago at Brookville and there is no doubt the kids were catching fish and having fun.

This latest opportunity by the PFBC and Cabela's seems to prey on gamblers rather than encouraging young anglers. It looks like there will be eight waters containing "winning" fish. Sorry couldn't pass up a Charlie Sheen reference.To make it even more exciting the contest will coincide with the Fish-for-Free Day on May 30. This will make the shark hunt scene in Jaws look like a Longwood Gardens tea party.

Sign up here. I wonder if you can bring dynamite Powerbait?
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 04/07/2011 (8261 reads)
Green DrakeOne of the most intriguing things for me about Paflyfish was the early meet ups that took place. Early on I considered the Internet to be an informative, but faceless place. I soon realized that many took advantage of the site to get together for many of their fly fishing trips.

I was contacted at one point in the early years by some of the members of the board that there was a number of people getting together for a Pennsylvania Fly Fishing Jamboree in the spring and did I want to attend. Well over the years the jamboree has continued and grown. To the point now that I would even call it an exclusive Pennsylvania event with people coming from Ohio, New York, New Jersey, Maryland and Florida.

This year is no exception and members on the forum are making plans to meet the weekend of May 20-21 at Seven Mountains Campground in Spring Mills, Pennsylvania. Please contact them if you would like to stay there that weekend.

Friday, May 20th
Jam attendees often start arriving throughout the day if they haven't arrived earlier in the week. We don't have use of the pavilion until 300 PM on Friday, when some Jamboree attendees will be pitching in to set up the pavilion for a convenient central location for meeting and events. Stop by after 3:00PM to help or meet others trying to get back out on the water.

Throughout the weekend, the pavilion is available for use as a staging or meeting area.

Fire Ring at the pavilion around dark

Fly Tying Marathon - All fly tyers are encouraged to bring their tying stuff to the pavilion to share their patterns and tying techniques.

Live Fly Swap(tentative) – (Does any member wish to organize this?)Members tie and exchange flies at the Jam and guaranteed fish. Participants signed up are: well, who are you?

Saturday, May 21st
Coffee 6-9am available at the pavilion

Casting Demos 9-10am at the pavilion. If you’re a beginner or an intermediate caster looking to improve or learn some new tricks, show up with your rod in hand! If you’re an expert, share your skill. Just show up with your rod at the pavilion.

Fire Ring at the pavilion around dark

Fly Tying Marathon - All fly tyers are encouraged to bring their tying stuff to the pavilion to share their patterns and tying techniques.

Talking Fly Fishing - Hopefully we can get an entertaining speaker for Saturday night. Dave can come again, if he would be so kind, or maybe split up the local flyshops.

Live Entertainment! - Last year we tried to create The PAFF Band (under the impromptu choreography of JackM) to crank out some great tunes for all to enjoy. as it turned out, I didn't make decent arrangements and instead we enjoyed the improvisation of several of our members, including the inimitable Shakey. If we could get him and the rest of the gang to come and volunteer, we'll do it all over again this time. If you'd like to join the band or just put in a solo performance, just bring your instrument and/or voice and let 'er rip. Quiet hours may be a factor. If we get all the sites booked for seven Mountains, perhaps they'll extend them for us.

Sunday, May 23rd
Coffee 6-9am available at the pavilion

More details will be added to this post.
This is a new location, but still puts us right in the middle of some of the best fly fishing in the state. Streams like Penns Creek, Spring Creek, Spruce Creek, Little Juanita and Fishing Creek are all within an hour of the campground.

In addition to the expected fly fishing opportunities authors, fly shop owners, and other experts are usually in attendance and provide a lot of great knowledge at the evening gathers.
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 04/06/2011 (2480 reads)
Belize Flyfishing

By Chris Frangiosa

Fishing has taken me too many beautiful places and one of my favorite destinations is Belize. Belize is located in Central America and borders Guatemala. Boasting the second biggest reef in the world, Belize is a mecca for divers and fisherman from all around the world. In particular, the Bonefish, Permit and Tarpon fishing is world class and can be had within a short boat ride from one of the many coastal towns.

Our last expedition to Belize was in March of 2011 and was a very successful venture. The recent ban on killing Bonefish for food has increased the average size of Bonefish greatly and many were caught and released on our last excursion. This particular trip was to the northern part of the country to an area called Ambergris Caye. Ambergris is a great area in that it offers great fishing opportunities, beautiful accommodation options and many restaurants, shops and bars to hit after a long day on the water.

Belize FlyfishingIf you haven’t fly fished in saltwater before I definitely suggest that you give it a try. Belize is a great place to learn as there are tons of fish and it is relatively easy to escape the strong winds that often accompany ocean fishing. I have a fall trip that is booking now, let me know if you are interested and we can discuss more details.

Chris is putting together a fall trip to Belize and to learn more you can contact him at tcoflyshop@tcoflyfishing.com


Chris Frangiosa - is the Retail Manager for TCO Fly Shop. Chris has spent the last decade or more on the east coast and working in the fly fishing industry. I am huge fan of Chris's photography and he can be found at the Bryn Mawr location. You can follow Chris on Twitter here: @tcoflyfishing
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 03/30/2011 (3165 reads)
trout seasonFor 18 counties across southeastern Pennsylvania the opening day for trout begins on April 2. This is a time honored event for many and signals the beginning of spring and the official start to the fishing season. Usually, this is a good day for me to clean the garage or do my hair. Although I am not a big fan of the crowds, It is a great opportunity for the masses to get out and hit the many approved trout waters.

The 18 counties open April 2 include: Adams, Berks, Bucks, Chester, Cumberland, Dauphin, Delaware, Franklin, Juniata, Lancaster, Lebanon, Lehigh, Montgomery, Northampton, Perry, Philadelphia, Schuylkill, and York.

Opening day for the rest of Pennsylvania begins on April 2 (correction April 16). This provides a sort of double-header in April and encourages me to then clean the basement or give the dog a bath.

New York actually sneaks in opening day on Friday, April 1. New Jersey has their opening day on April 9. Maryland has a staggered opening depending on the stream.

So let the games begin!

Photograph provided by Afishinado
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 03/27/2011 (7510 reads)
By Alan Ritt

Ritt’s Fighting CrayfishThere are times when I just don’t feel inspired to sit down and tie more of “the same.” Whether “the same” means flies others and I have tied for years, or it means patterns I’ve conjured up and like to think of as more or less mine. The point is a change is needed.

During one of these restless periods a decade or so ago I was thinking to myself that I didn’t fish nearly enough large flies. You know, the ones regularly hanging from the jaws of those fish in the pictures of each day’s newest instant hero. Not that I felt like I should be that hero, but sometimes you just want a shot at a larger fish. Another streamer or leech pattern just wasn’t what I was craving though. I wanted something more interesting. My mind gravitated to the crayfish.

Though there were a lot of effective crayfish patterns around, I wasn’t convinced there weren’t improvements to be made. I needed a pattern that would swim, crawl or rest in a realistic posture and was snag resistant enough to fish around cover where crayfish are commonly found. The details of the trial and error are entertaining stories of their own (like the version that, though heavily weighted, floated in the surface film).

Suffice it to say I did come up with a pattern that has been extremely effective for many species of fish and in many types of water and fishing conditions. The pattern incorporates the hard shiny carapace and multitude of legs, antennae and other appendages of the natural. It has lots of movement in the water, even when not being actively manipulated. The hook not only rides up, but the posture of the fly places the hook eye down and the bend up in the water column to make it relatively snag free even without a weed guard (or fish guard as I think of them). And unlike all other crayfish patterns I’ve seen, the main arms and claws do not lay limply behind the fly as if it was dead, but are held high like a natural warding off a predator and collapse behind the fly when stripped just as a live crayfish holds them when swimming.

I’ve used this fly myself to catch trout, largemouth and smallmouth bass, bluegills, crappie, bullheads, silver salmon and bonefish. Others have told me of catching carp, walleye and pike as well. Below is the recipe, vary the color to match the crayfish in your local waters (there are many variations) and let me know how you do! My flies are available on MyFlies.com and also my own web site has patterns and information on my tying demo appearances, lessons, guide services and flies as well as my contact information below.
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Published by YoughRiverGuide on 03/20/2011 (8186 reads)
Written by Ernie Pribanic

Fly Fishing the YoughioghenyMarch is a hard month for the Western-Pennsylvania trout angler. Stricken with a surliness know only to those who have been denied the thing which they most desire for the better part of an Appalachian winter, they find themselves sitting haggardly in front of their computers, monitoring with doubtful eye the USGS gauges that correspond to their favorite spring time haunts. (At least, I do.)

People often ask me, obviously at times other than those when I’m wearing that March-spawned frustration upon my surly visage, “So what does the Youghiogheny’s foremost and most authoritative fishing guide look for before heading out to the river in the spring?” (They say that. They really do.)

Paflyfish's very own Dave Kile posited this question to me recently and asked if I might provide my answer in writing. Gracious fellow that I am, I reply thusly:

Upper Yough: (south of the Mason-Dixon, Maryland license required)

Ideal CFS for the wade-fisher is right around 300 or below. Of primary interest on this stretch of river is the four-mile catch and release area below the Brookfield Power plant. Brookfield Power releases cold water into the river here, creating a year-round fishery.

While this piece of water is a smaller version of the middle Yough below, it is still, by Eastern standards, a large piece of trout water, and you want to avoid it at higher flows.

Middle Yough: (below Youghiogheny River Lake--confusing isn’t it?)

Fly Fishing the YoughioghenyYou need to think of this stretch of river as having two sections: the dam to the Casselman River is section A, and the Casselman River to Ohiopyle is section B. Popular opinion says that section A can be waded safely at 1200 cfs or below, but this angler likes it best between 500 and 900 cfs. Check the USGS gauge at the dam for current flows.

Below the Casselman (and thanks to the Casselman), you have to check the gauge below Confluence. I won’t wade fish this piece of river unless it is at 1500 cfs or below. The determining factor is the amount of water coming north out of Maryland: if the Army Corps is running a lot of water from the dam, over 1000 cfs for instance, and you have the Casselman adding another 1000 cfs to the river, the Middle is out for all but the stout of heart.

Gear: (what to throw in you quiver)

For spring time fishing on the Yough, no matter which section you choose, I like a five and sometimes--if throwing bigger bugs--a six. If you know that you are going to be fishing streamers, a full sinking line is not a bad choice either.

As the season progresses, a nine-foot four weight can be a good choice for dry fly fishing on the Middle, and the Upper becomes perfect water for pitching dries with your favorite three or four weight.

Bugs:(hatches o’ plenty)

Ernie PribanicYou’ll find the typical spring bugs on both the Middle and the Upper, though the Upper is the buggier of the two. Midge hatches are a given on warm days throughout February and March, and if the water levels oblige, you’ll likely find fish working them in slower water and tailouts. Generally, by March, black stones, brown stones, and blue wing olives are common sights on both the Middle and the Upper River as well. Dry fly fishing is typically better on the Upper than the Middle throughout spring, though. This is generally due to water levels: when the Middle is high, you’ll have to work harder to find rising fish as most of their eating seems to get done below the surface.

On the Upper, you’ll find all the major mayfly species; while on the Middle, caddis, olives, march browns, and crane flies are what’s for dinner through April and May. Both sections have good populations of Green Drakes as well provided you find the right habitat for that particular burrower.

River Information and Guide Services:
For river information, hatch charts, or to book a guided trip on the Upper Yough and other Maryland waters, check out www.springcreekoutfitter.com.
For river reports or to book a guided float trip on the PA side, contact Ernie Pribanic or Jim DiBiase at www.laurelhighlandsguideservices.com

I want to thank Ernie for his contributions in writing this post. - Dave Kile
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 03/14/2011 (3053 reads)


The spring offers many anglers an alternative to trout in the rivers and tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay and Delaware River. It is the time when shad return to spawn in the freshwater rivers from their winter feeding in the Atlantic Ocean. This migration has had terrible struggle starting early in our American history.

This story has it's beginnings going back to the late 1600's as mentioned by William Penn - "Shads are excellent fish and of the Bigness of our Carp: They are so plentiful..."

Certainly a popular and plentiful fish for commercial fisherman until 1806 when gillnets were first outlawed for many years. Sadly, this was only the beginning of many issues that plagued the shad in our region.

In the early 1800's the first dams along the Delaware were constructed and shut down shad migration past those points. As a result the access to spring spawning grounds were lost.

The Shamokin, Clarks Ferry, Duncan’s Island, Nanticoke, and Columbia dams along the Susquehanna were constructed to support the Pennsylvania canal. A dam above Newport halted the shad's migration up the Juniata during this time as well.

Once the railways took hold those dams and along the Susquehanna were removed and some shad returned. While some gains were made right behind this the effects of industrialization took it's toll on all the rivers. Coal mining, deforestation and pollution like sewage discharge was unchecked in the rivers.

Habitat, pollution and overfishing continue continued to devastate the shad populations in the rivers and tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay and Delaware River.

With more dams added in the early 1900's like the Conowingo and Holtwood all shad migration ceased upstream on those rivers.

It not until the early 1970's that the first progress was made in utilizing fish ladders and stocking the rivers again with millions of shad eggs.

This new opportunity for anglers has been growing as the American Shad has seen a wonderful recovery especially over the past 20 years. This has been a conservative effort by organizations like the New Jersey Fish and Wildlife, Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission, power companies and sportsman groups in the region.

Thanks to Van Wagner for his YouTube Video and JakesLeakyWaders for finding this video.
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 03/08/2011 (3666 reads)




The Fly Fishing Show in Philadelphia was held the the weekend of March 5 & 6, 2011. This is the first time the show was held at the Valley Forge Convention Center and sounds like it will be part of the schedule for next year as well.

Being that is was the first year there was a little smaller with the number of vendors, booths and presenters. Chuck Furimsky, Fly Fishing Show Director, made sure there was plenty of the star power and regulars to make it a very good first year and plenty to go around for all. Joe Humphreys, Bob Clouser, Eric Stroup, Mike Heck, Bob Mead, John Collins, Shawn Davis, Anthony Giaquinto, Scott Cesari, Dave Brandt and Don Bastian to name a few

A lot of booths included TCO Fly Shops, Simms, The Evening Hatch Shop, Valley Forge TU, Main Line Fly-Tyers, Project Healing Waters, AA Outfitters Fly Shop and plenty more.

What I liked most about the show was just how well attended it was by Paflyfish members. I was into the show for than a few minutes and found Heritage Angler and LRSABecker eyeing up the hall looking for some deals. I'll let the video tell the story. More pictures are posted on the Facebook Fanpage : http://www.facebook.com/paflyfish

Nice show and looking forward to getting back to Philly next year as I am sure this will really grow!
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