Register now on PaFlyFish.com! Login
HOME FORUM BLOG PHOTOS LINKS


Blog
Category Last published item
PaFlyFish.com  PaFlyFish.com
Hank Patterson's Reel Montana Adventure - ...
Fly Fishing  Fly Fishing
Into the PAWilds
Edit category Product Review Product Review
USGS Water Data Goes Mobile
Fly Fishing Photography: Getting the Shot with ...
Getting Out For Fall Fly Fishing
Interviews  Interviews
Interviews
Local Fly Shops! - Hank Patterson's Montana ...
Conservation  Conservation
New Zealand mudsnails in Spring Creek
Fly Tying  Fly Tying
Fly Tying Instructions - Black Foam Beetle
Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission  Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission
Anglers Choose Pink

Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 05/07/2012 (3783 reads)
Throughout the year trout feed a disproportional amount of the time under the water. For me even during a recent sulphur hatch on Spring Creek trout were not rising and could be seen actively feeding below the surface. George Daniel's book, Dynamic Nymphing, offers an extensive look at tactics and strategies that get to the heart of subsurface nymph fishing.

Dynamic NymphingI enjoy all the puzzles that fly-fishing provides and always appreciate ways to overcome those challenges. George shares the best of these techniques in solving many of these trials with his book in a wonderful format of instruction, photography and sketches for some of the best approaches to nymph fishing.

A range of chapters provide: a nymphing systems overview, riggings, casting techniques, tight-line tactics, fly patterns, small streams, challenging locations and much more.

Anglers not as familiar with all aspects nymph fishing or looking to extend their subsurface skills will quickly enjoy all facets of this book.

For example George provides details for the Curly Q rig, which is ideal for shallow water and longer casting requirements. This may be a more advanced technique for some and is broken down into a couple parts within the book for use and clarification. Explanations of how to make the Curly Q and ways to cast this rig are completely covered. In addition, he provides many other detailed leader formulas making it easy to understand where and when to implement these different strategies.

Dynamic Nymphing provides several for tight-line tactics, which is a method of nymphing without the use of a suspension support device. Joe Humphreys mentored George and details of the Harvey/Humphrey high-stick methods are explained along with several European nymphing styles as well.

George provides well over 60 detailed fly patterns ranging from pheasant tails to Czech nymphs. All these flies are beautifully photographed and chronicled.

For those looking to explore wild brook streams or find themselves in other challenging spots there are several chapters that take you off your typical stream and provide options in some adverse nymph fishing situations.

While I have been fly fishing for quite some time, I can get bit lackadaisical with my approach to the sport. Too often I stick with what I know. What I liked most about Dynamic Nymphing for me was getting me out of my comfort zone and to try some techniques I have not yet mastered. For those newer to the sport the Dynamic Nymphing provides a wealth of information that will certainly help improve their fly-fishing opportunities at many levels.

Dynamic Nymphing: Tactics, Techniques, and Flies from Around the World [Hardcover] by George Daniel can be found on Amazon here
.

Dynamic NymphingGeorge Daniel is assistant manager at TCO Fly Shop, in State College, PA. He travels the country conducting fly-fishing clinics for various groups and organizations. George is a former member and current Head Coach of Fly Fishing Team USA. Some of his accomplishments include being a two time national fly fishing champion, won The Fly Fishing Masters, and ranked as high as fifth in the World along with other competitive achievements. The title of the book will be “Dynamic Nymphing.” He lives near Lamar, Pennsylvania. If you want to keep up with George in the Internet you can follow him on his Facebook page here.






  Send article

Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 05/02/2012 (1215 reads)


The Simms 2012 Shoot Out videography contest in Bozeman, Montana was held at this year's ICE OUT Guide Event from April 16-18, 2012. Videographers hit the water in Montana with the West's best fishing guides. The culmination was the Shoot Out competition held on April 19 at the Willson Auditorium in Bozeman, MT. Sponsored by Costa and The Drake Magazine, the Shoot Out is a one-of-a-kind event that celebrates fly fishing filmmaking and the fishing guide.

Rules of the Shoot Out Competition:
• Teams of 2
• Simms Guide Ambassador to accompany each group
• Teams started at sunrise (6:27am MST) on Monday, April 16
• Each team can only submit 1 film for inclusion in the MAIN EVENT
• All footage for inclusion in the MAIN EVENT must be shot during the prescribed shooting window
• Submitted films must be no longer than 6 minutes in length

All four finalists can be found here to review. Ian Majszak was the Shoot Out winner with "Untitled". My friends Luke Carroll and Adam Kryder from Raw Water Productions made their way out west from New York and entered this with "Brant Oswald".

I am looking forward to more projects from Luke and Adam this summer.






  Send article

Published by Andy [The_Sasquatch] on 04/25/2012 (1412 reads)
By The_Sasquatch
Photos by Skybay


We're all back from the 2012 Quill Gordon Summit, and by all accounts the event was a great success! We had a good turn out of about 7 guys; Skybay, Dave_S, Turkey, CSoult, Wetfly_01, The Sasquatch, and my father, Jerry (non-board member).

Quill GordonThe weekend started for Jerry and me at 5:30am. By 9:15am we were on the Pine Creek in Ansonia not far from Sandfly's shop. We fished for about an hour and then headed over to Sandy's. First thing we noticed was that the water was low and very very clear. No fish to be found in the AM, but lots and lots of caddis on the water.

Meeting Sandfly is worth a weekend trip in and of itself. He's full of stories, all full of hilarity and also fly fishing wisdom. His hens that he raises for hackle are beautiful, and although his shop is quite small, the amount of stuff he has in there is overwhelming! He loaded my pops and I up with flies and advice and about two hours later, we were on our way up to our camp.

We opened up Camp Iroquois on the top of Denton Hill and made plans for our evening outing. Decided to hit the Pine Creek down in Gaines. Again, LOTS AND LOTS of caddis, but no risers, no action sub surface, it was quite confusing. Dad and I decided to bail on that stretch while the evening was still young, and drove up Rt 6 to where the Pine crosses Rt 6 above Galeton, right at the Sylvania Diner. This was the right choice. Dad went down stream, I went up stream, and both of us came back to the car with reports of many rising trout and several brought to hand, mostly hold over rainbows.

After returning to camp I called Skybay to make plans for him to meet up w/ us the next day, and then called Csoult. He told me him and Turkey were already at the campground (less than a minute drive from my cabin) and that I should come over. After telling him I was too tired for socializing, I changed my mind and headed over to their camp site. Glad I did. Got to hang w/ Turkey and Csoult for a few hours, getting to know each other, drink some beer and tell some stories, before the rest of the guys came up.

Quill GordonFriday we met at 8am and headed to Lyman Run. Beautiful setting, but again the clear and low water was our bane. As we worked our way up stream, the further we got the more fish we saw, but we were unable to bring any to hand. After heading back to the cars, we found a tiny trib that flowed under the road and into a little drainage ditch. We spooked two brookies out of that little pool, so I decided to rock it "Lehigh Valley Style" and fish the drainage ditch. After about 15 minutes I brought my first Potter County native brookie of 2012 to hand. A hilarious approach to catching a beautiful fish!

After lunch Dave_S arrived on the scene and we made plans for the evening trip. Originally we planned on hitting the Allegheny, but after seeing the flows, Dave_S led us up to the Oswego. Right decision as the flow was much better. Tons and tons of caddis flying around, march browns, even thought we saw some sulfers...but NO RISING FISH! I managed to catch a decent sized "Golden Rainbow" on a hare's ear (fun fight!), Dave_S caught a stocked brookie, my dad caught a nice little brookie that regurgitated a big old sculpin, and csoult and Turkey were wishing they stayed at State College ;) Ended the day at the campsite, sitting around the fire ring where we met up w/ Skybay who had us all laughing and telling stories quite quickly!

Saturday was the main event. Dad and I arrived at the campsite to find that Wetfly_01 arrived, and we learned that the plan was to hit the Pine all day. Wetfly_01 quickly took on the guide responsibilities as he led us to our first destination; the Pine Creek at Darling Run. Good flow to the Pine, the weather was overcast with rain, so conditions were working for us for the first time all weekend. There were several hookups at the first section and everyone was having fun, although wet and cold. After heading back to the vehicles for lunch (Dave_S I'm sure will tell the story of "The Sasquatch in a China Shop....), we headed up to the Pine at Blackwell. Wetfly_01 had us walk upstream to get away from all the crowds, and put us on some GREAT pocket water. As the rest of the group fished upstream, I joined up w/ Csoult and started hitting large pools. The March Browns were coming off the water big time, and the trout were rising! Csoult and I caught it right and we had a blast for the next two hours picking off risers on MBs. We officially renamed the event, "The March Brown Summit". Everyone brought fish to hand, including Skybay who caught his first fish on a dry fly. I say fish, because when he landed the beast, we discovered that he caught a 3lb smallie! Great catch!

Quill GordonNext we drove to Slate Run Tackle Shop. Lusted after things we couldn't afford, ate some legendary Slate Run sandwiches, and then fished the stretch behind SR. The rain was coming down HARD now, it was windy, and the temps dropped about 10 degrees from what it was when the day started. Fish were still rising, but none of us could figure out to what. Lots of MB and Caddis on the water, but they weren't taking either. Tried some midges, still nothing. Dave_S hooked up w/ one on a bugger, and my dad brought a few to hand. We all had enough though and were back in the trucks by 8:30. Headed back to Camp Iroquois, got the wood stove burning, Skybay cooked for us (amazing food from Skybay!), and the guys sat around the dinner table for hours talking FFing. All except for me, who headed over to the sofa and passed out...although I added my 2 cents every now and again. All were out and in bed by 12:30am.

Turkey took off first thing the next morning, the rest of us met up and had a final meal together at the Sylvania Diner. It was a great time. Crazy to think the weekend began w/ weather in the 70s, and now they're calling for snow. No QG anywhere, but it didn't matter. The landscape and the company made the event worth every minute. Can't wait till next year.
  Send article

Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 04/02/2012 (2287 reads)
by Brian McGeehan
Guest writer for Paflyfish


As a kid growing up in Pennsylvania I dreamed of visiting the Rocky Mountain West to fish those big rivers that I saw in the fly fishing magazines. Western rivers seemed so different compared to the smaller fisheries that I spent my youth on and I was a bit intimidated when I first arrived in Montana on a summer long geology field trip sponsored by Penn State. I quickly fell in love with the massive feel of the biggest rivers and the wide open surroundings. There were definitely some new skills that I needed to develop to be successful on the bigger rivers but I found that the techniques and strategies that I had developed in Pennsylvania also worked in Montana. Some of the most talented anglers I have had a chance to guide often come from Pennsylvania and other eastern states and those fertile wild trout fisheries of the Appalachian mountains are a great training ground for some of the world's best fly fisherman. If you are an Eastern fly fisherman considering a Montana fly fishing trip you will be happy to know that your skills honed on your home rivers will put you in a great position to find success on Western waters. Here are five skills that I learned in PA that have helped me on our local Montana fisheries.

Fishing hatches
The rivers and streams in the ridge and valley province of Pennsylvania have some of the most abundant and diverse hatch sequences of any waters I have had the opportunity to visit. Few locations can compare to the overlapping series of aquatic insect emergence that happen on a single day in late May on waters like Penns Creek, Big Fishing Creek and others. Spending many a day on the fertile limestone streams of central Pennsylvania helped me to pay close attention to the different life cycles of the varied insects. I learned to differentiate between a trout feeding on duns, emergers or spinners. I also began to recognize when trout were on caddis with splashy rises verses the more delicate takes of mayfly species. I learned that trout would switch from one species (or development stage) to another during the course of an evening and that I had to be constantly aware of these changing preferences if I wanted to be successful during each stage of the hatch. These lessons have carried with me when I am fishing Western waters. Trout feeding during an intense pmd hatch on the Missouri can be just a selective as trout rising to sulphurs on the Yellow Breeches. On some freestone waters such as the Madison the hatches do not appear as intense but the same transitions from nymphs, to duns, to spinners still occur and the conditioning to always be on the watch for this frequently pays off.

Getting close
One of the best lessons that I learned as a kid was how to get close to trout and still catch them. My first experiences with a fly rod in Pennsylvania occurred on laurel choked brook trout streams in the Allegheny National Forest. Because of the thick canopy of trees long back casts were not an option and I had no choice but to sneak in close to make a cast. Western streams and rivers are much more open than their Eastern counterparts and anglers are not forced to get close. I have found that getting as close as possible to the holding water is still a great strategy. The closer you are to the fish the better the presentation will be and the faster the hook set will be. It is very easy to get caught swinging for the fences by making longer than needed casts simply because the wide open landscape permits it.

Spring creeks and tail waters
Pennsylvania is home to some of the most fertile spring fed streams in the world. These productive fisheries are home to high concentrations of healthy wild trout and abundant macro invertebrates. The glassy currents on waters like the Letort and Big Spring require stealthy approaches and carefully placed casts. When fishing these waters as a youth I learned that I needed to carefully plan out each cast before approaching a run. The angle of my position to the fish was extremely important and I began to understand that finding ways to present the fly to the fish before the leader definitely increased the chances for success. Montana is also home to some of the worlds finest spring creeks along with dam released tail water fisheries like the Bighorn, Missouri and Beaverhead that produce spring creek like conditions. My experiences on the Eastern limestone streams helped me to feel right at home when I first visited the legendary Paradise Valley spring creeks like Armstrong and Nelson.

Small streams are fun too!
Even larger Pennsylvania trout streams with the exceptions of tail waters like the Delaware and Allegheny would be considered small by Western standards. When I first moved to the West I spent most of my time on the famous blue ribbon rivers like the Madison, Yellowstone and Missouri because fishing such a massive body of water for trout was new and exciting. As time went on I began to explore the bountiful smaller fisheries that reminded me of home. One of the great things about Montana is that nearly every body of water no matter how big or small seems to hold trout in the Western half of the state. Montana also allows public access to any fishery as long as anglers remain inside of the high water mark.

How to thoroughly work a run
Although there is still plenty of water in Pennsylvania to enjoy there also a lot more people. On some waters like Penns Creek or Spring Creek during famous hatches like the Green Drake or Sulphur the influx of anglers coming for the hatch limited the amount of water available. I learned that if I was in a good run that I had better make the best of it and thoroughly work the water before moving on. Montana rivers receive much less pressure compared to the East and we have the luxury of moving a long way without worrying about being crowded by numerous other anglers (with some exception like the easily accessed wade areas on the Bighorn). Although some days covering as much water as possible is the way to go there are times when slowing down and really dialing into a run is beneficial. When I know that trout are heavily concentrated in a run I will make a few passes through it. If I am nymph fishing I often make a shallow pass with less weight and a shorter indicator to pick off the more aggressive fish first. The shallower rig allows me to detect strikes faster and get a higher percentage of hookups. Eventually I will work the run with a heavier rig and longer leader to get to fish that are in the deeper and heavier water that are not willing to move far to feed.

Brian McGeehan is the owner and outfitter of Montana Angler Fly Fishing in Bozeman, MT. He is a native of Western Pennsylvania where he spent his youth chasing trout across the Keystone state. Montana Angler Fly Fishing is also a sponsor on Paflyfish.






  Send article

Published by David Weaver [Fishidiot] on 03/05/2012 (1936 reads)
This article is another in Dave Weaver’s on going “Casting through History” series. His previous article in this series was John Brown’s Bass.

Ed KochOver the years many of you, if you’ve visited Yellow Breeches Anglers in Boiling Springs, have probably gazed at one particular dusty old mounted brown trout. When I was a kid, I’d look at this fish and think that it wasn’t the best taxidermy job. If you’re a Cumberland Valley regular or otherwise familiar with the writings of Charlie Fox and others, you’re probably aware of the story behind this fish. If not, we’ll re-tell the story behind this dusty old trophy…..a veritable sacred relic of Pennsylvania fishing history.

Ed Koch is part of Pennsylvania’s unique fly fishing heritage. His book Fishing the Midge is a classic and, like many of the writings of his generation, is always worth a re-read. Ed was also the long time owner of the Yellow Breeches fly shop. Many of you may remember chatting with Ed in the shop. This was Ed’s great trophy, caught from Letort Spring Run in August 1962. Charlie Fox recollects the story in his classic, This Wonderful World of Trout: Ed had hooked the fish three times previously. Finally, he saw the giant again and, after several casts, the big brown rose and ate a Letort Cricket, a popular deer hair dry fly. After a tough, twenty five minute fight in the weeds, the fish came to the net: 27 and a half inches and over nine pounds. Fox describes Koch’s trembling hands when the fish was weighed and photographed. Shortly later, the Fish Commission announced that this was the largest brown trout ever caught in Pennsylvania on a dry fly. Does this fish still hold this distinction today? I don’t know - perhaps. I think every fly fisherman dreams of that fish of a lifetime; a fish that takes perseverance and effort to finally catch.

Ed KochThis was Ed Koch’s fish of a lifetime and he had it displayed in his fly shop where it still hangs today. In the future, this famous fish from the golden era of Cumberland Valley fly fishing will likely be part of the collection of the Pennsylvania Museum of Fly Fishing where it will continue to remind us that a fish of a lifetime is out there…. waiting for us to make that perfect cast.

For more information on the Pennsylvania Museum of Fly Fishing


Excerpts and black and white photo above from:
This Wonderful World of Trout, by Charles K. Fox
Rockville Center NY: Freshet Press, pp 172-178






  Send article

Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 02/19/2012 (1387 reads)

A Dance for Steelhead from Matthew Grant on Vimeo.




Adam Kryder, Lucas Carroll & Matt Smythe are in production of a winter fly fishing film called "No Off-Season". The guys have put together a BTS show reel as they are shooting this winter. I had a chance to catch up with the guys at the Fly Fishing Show in Somerset and enjoyed hearing more about the project. You can follow more on the Raw Water Productions blog.

I am looking forward to more updates from the guys.






  Send article

Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 02/13/2012 (2328 reads)
The Stream Reports have been an integral part of Paflyfish almost since the site began in 1995. There has been a lot of disagreement conversation about the ideas of sharing stream information. The differences dialog has been played out time and time again. Thought I would give a little of my perspective what the Stream Reports are all about on this website.

stream reportsOne interesting fact is that Stream Reports make up only 1.6% of all the traffic on the Paflyfish. More people spend time talking about cougar sightings in the OT Forum than stream reports. Well that is a bit of an exaggeration, but not that far from the truth.

Stream Reports are a way for anglers to share objective information about their recent fly-fishing experiences in the region. Details about water conditions, weather, stream, location, hatches, fishing successes, flies used and other pertinent information can make up a successful report. A photo or two showing the stream or hatches always improves the information. Here is an example of one of my trips to a little know place called Kettle Creek in 2010. One of the benefits of a report is the opportunity for a discussion for new or unique experiences. A report does not have to be clinical as much as it should informative and fun.

Fly-fishing is about fun?

So why bother sharing? This site is built on the foundation of sharing information for the improvement for all our fly fishing opportunities. On this website we discus gear, fly-tying, conservation, meet-ups, techniques and yes I dare say it...streams. The better we are informed the better experiences we all have fly-fishing. Not Sharing (NS) of information is as detrimental to anglers as inaccessible water.

I like traveling all over the region and stream reports offer a rich data-set of real-time information from those who are actually on the stream providing first-hand information. In combination with other water data from the USGS, I can make well-informed decisions about my trips.

Wish I had the time to drive back and forth to Potter County to learn about those conditions on a regular basis. Sadly the four-hour ride limits the convenience of such scouting trips and when I do go I liked to have some sense of conditions before blowing thru about $50 in gas for drive up to just hang at the Lakeview with Rick watching golf. Not that there is anything wring with that.

In my early days of fly-fishing, pre-Internet, post-clay tablet area, I spent plenty of trips standing over high water and blown-out streams looking stupid with a can of Iron City in my hand. (Now I have a Miller Lite in my hand as to look less fat, can’t shake the stupid part.) So I would then pack up my cooler, break out my DeLorme Atlas throw a dart and haul on down Route 80 for my favorite game of “let’s find the stream that isn’t blown out.”

Stream Reports help me plan for my intended destinations, but also investigate streams that are on the way or nearby. A few years ago I was heading to Penns Creek for the Jam and wanted to catch a stream along the way up. Having never been to Clarks Creek I checked a report that was posted few days before to help get a take on hatches, water quality, and general stream info. Truly enjoyed the stop as I had the whole project to myself that morning.

stream reportsSure real-time is cool, but even more important is the historic value of all this data. Understanding where and when hatches are occurring on certain streams and regions is a great record for us all to enjoy. The reports today go back for over five years, covering many states and countless streams. This will only grow over time.

Hundreds of waterways in the region are stocked with millions of trout and promoted by state agencies for the public to enjoy. (BTW most state agencies provide free maps and websites showing the detailed locations of all the stocked streams if you are even in doubt of the mystery of these locations.) The more of these common streams we share in our reports the better we have a complete picture of our fly-fishing opportunities and spread this information out.

The PFBC has identified nearly 3,600 streams as naturally reproducing wild trout streams. Most of these streams and like waters are small with fragile ecosystems. While hearing reports on these streams is encouraged, named streams and detailed locations are not required. Simply identifying the county, date and experience really can offer enough for most any angler. The delight of these jewels is the discovery.

I don't always put in a stream report and there is not obligation for anyone to do the same. Streams while a small part of the site do offer a lot of open information for all to share and improve their fly-fishing experiences. So go find a new location and have some fun.






  Send article

Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 01/31/2012 (5769 reads)
Green DrakeOne of the most intriguing things for me about Paflyfish was the early meet ups that took place. Early on I considered the Internet to be an informative, but faceless place. I soon realized that many took advantage of the site to get together for many of their fly fishing trips.

I was contacted at one point in the early years by Maurice and other members of the board that there was a number of people getting together for a Pennsylvania Fly Fishing Jamboree in the spring and did I want to attend. I was pretty shocked by the idea. Well over the years the jamboree has continued and grown. To the point now that I wouldn't even call it an exclusive Pennsylvania event with people coming from Ohio, New York, New Jersey, Maryland and Florida. Some photo's over the years are here.

We have a lot of fun fishing over some of Pennsylvania's finest streams. If the Green Drakes are on many head over to Penns Creek, but the Little J, Spruce, Fishing and Spring Creek all offer a lot of fun in May. In some years it has rained, well every year, and there are many alternatives to the bigger named streams as well.

This year is no exception and members on the forum are making plans to meet the weekend of May 18-20, 2012 at Seven Mountains Campground in Spring Mills, Pennsylvania. Please contact them if you would like to stay there that weekend.

Friday, May 18th
Jam attendees often start arriving throughout the day if they haven't arrived earlier in the week. We don't have use of the pavilion until 300 PM on Friday, when some Jamboree attendees will be pitching in to set up the pavilion for a convenient central location for meeting and events. Stop by after 3:00PM to help or meet others trying to get back out on the water.

Friday evening our guest speaker will be author and Paflyfish member Dwight "Troutbert" Landis. Dwight is best known for his book, Trout Streams of Pennsylvania: An Angler's Guide and shared an interview with me a few years ago that can be found here. Dwight will be speaking about Spring Creek starting at 10:00 PM

Saturday, May 19th
Coffee 6-9am available at the pavilion

Fire Ring at the pavilion around dark

Live Entertainment! - Last year we tried to create The PAFF Band (under the impromptu choreography of JackM) to crank out some great tunes for all to enjoy. as it turned out, I didn't make decent arrangements and instead we enjoyed the improvisation of several of our members, including the inimitable Shakey. If we could get him and the rest of the gang to come and volunteer, we'll do it all over again this time. If you'd like to join the band or just put in a solo performance, just bring your instrument and/or voice and let 'er rip. Quiet hours may be a factor. If we get all the sites booked for Seven Mountains, perhaps they'll extend them for us.

Sunday, May 20th
Coffee 6-9am available at the pavilion.

This is a new location, but still puts us right in the middle of some of the best fly fishing in the state. Streams like Penns Creek, Spring Creek, Spruce Creek, Little Juanita and Fishing Creek are all within an hour of the campground.

In addition to the expected fly fishing opportunities authors, fly shop owners, and other experts are usually in attendance and provide a lot of great knowledge at the evening gathers. Follow the latest details in the forum here.
  Send article

Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 01/30/2012 (2444 reads)


When winter brings it's frosty cold grip, it is the time of year that I start lamenting for my days fishing on the Little J and other streams. Well not the crappy days when I miss like 40 fish and only catch 3, the really good days when I get like 40 or 60 all on the same fly and never have to move. Not sure what day that was, but I remember it like it was yesterday or dream maybe.

Well it has not been so cold, but my dreams of fly fishing certainly get better when I get to share them with friends. I usually find the winter Fly Fishing Shows are a great place for some winter meet-ups.

I made my way this past weekend to Somerset, NJ for the The Fly Fishing Show. This years show seemed to have a lot more vendors and attendees. Can't tell if it was the better weather or the slightly improving economy, but none the less it was pretty busy on Friday, too.

We all go to the shows for different reasons. Mine is to meet up with people I seem to spend more time with exchanging emails, forum posts and tweets rather than actually sharing a beer. For me the expectations of finding a deal are just not what the show is about.

The exhibit hall was filled with many of the usuals, but several new faces as well. One of my first stops was to check in with Mike Heck and get the early show report. He was pretty busy with folks stopping by and then heading over to the Stackpole Publishers booth.

Justin and team from Allen Fly Fishing were at the show for the first time. It was good to catch up with the guys on Friday night discussing everything from musky fishing to photography and even plans on an upcoming trip out East for them this spring.

I jumped into a real good seminar with John Miller from West Branch Angler. Excellent rundown on what to expect on the East and West Branches of the Delaware. More importantly, what a motivator to hit the Upper Delaware this year and join Krayfish and the guys for the summer Catskills Jam.

George Daniel shared some insights at his workshop on Central Pennsylvania Streams that was very well attended. I have been spending a lot more time in and around State College lately and reading George's book, Dynamic Nymphing this winter. So I was glad to catch up with him and figure out some time to hit Spring Creek this year.

Looking forward to catching up with everyone who will be attending the Fly Fishing Show in Lancaster next month.

I want to thank my friend Keith for keeping us schedule during the show. We just need to get something scheduled this spring for a trip to the Little J and see if we can find one of those good days I seem to dream about.

Check out the forum for more personal insights from other Paflyfish members.






  Send article

Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 01/16/2012 (3709 reads)
By Gaeron Friedrichs (gaeronf)

stoneflyAs we all know, winter is here. To me, it sure doesn’t feel like it. There’s no snow at all. But since its winter, it’s time to go to the winter flies. When someone says winter flies, I typically think big stoneflies, or little midges. Here I’m going to show you a pattern I developed. The Goldilocks Stonefly is a golden stonefly representation. Keep in mind, this isn’t just a winter fly, it can be used year round, but it is a super effective fly in the winter. It incorporates some great realistic and attractive aspects. For example, the use of rubber legs and Australian Possum give the fly superior movement. Typically you want stones to be super heavy. I use a tungsten bead on this fly, along with a great deal of lead (or lead free) wire. This is due to the fact that the abdomen, legs, and thorax is all natural material. As some of you may or may not know some natural furs, like hare’s ear and possum, will decrease the sink rate of a fly. That’s why we balance the fly out with the extreme weighting. Like I said before, the rubber legs (used for tails and antennae) will give the fly great movement, and the fly will breathe great with all the natural materials. The back will give the fly a little contrast and flash, and the thick rib gives a distinct ribbing. The hook I love to use is a Skalka Streamer hook. This hook is super strong, and has a ridiculous point. So first, let’s look at the exact recipe:

Goldilocks Stone
Hook-Skalka Streamer Hook size 6
Bead-Matching Gold Tungsten Bead
Additional Weight-A large portion of lead wraps. Used here is .025. Be as liberal or as stingy as you wish
Thread-Golden Stonefly colored Danville’s Flat Waxed Nylon
Tails and Antennae-Gold or yellow rubber legs. Round or square doesn’t matter. Barring optional.
Rib-Brown, Copper, or Amber colored MEDIUM UTC wire
Abdomen-Australian Possum/Icelandic Sheep Golden Stone Blend
Abdomen Cover-1 strand of wide Mylar tinsel
Thorax- Australian Possum/Icelandic Sheep Golden Stone Blend
Thorax Cover-2 strands of wide Mylar tinsel
Additional Materials-Brown and Black Sharpie

Read detailed instructions here.
  Send article

RSS Feed



Site Content
Login
Username:

Password:

Remember me



Lost Password?

Register now!
Stay Connected

twitterfeed.com facebook instagram RSS Feed

Sponsors
Polls
Will you be fly fishing this autumn?
Yes 95% (139)
No 0% (0)
Thinking about it 4% (6)
_PL_TOTALVOTES
The poll closed at 2014/10/31 17:56
1 Comment





Copyright 2014 by PaFlyFish.com | Privacy Policy| Provided by Kile Media Group | Design by 7dana.com