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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 12/22/2014 (18 reads)
christmas tree flyI was catching up on some of the recent threads in the Paflyfish Fly Tying Forum and found a post from Night_Stalker about a Christmas Tree Fly. Digging a little deeper into the post I checked out the post originating from Louis Cahill at Gink and Gasoline. Louis is an advertising photographer and along with Kent Klewein share their fly fishing stories on Gink and Gasoline. I have enjoyed many of their blog posts, but had missed this one from a couple years ago.

Well Loius served up a little holiday fly tying wonderment with his post a couple years ago and should you should check out his Christmas Tree Fly post and the Gink and Gasoline blog.





Happy Holidays,

From Paflyfish!


images with permission from Louis Cahill
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 12/14/2014 (264 reads)
Winter fly fishing can a be a very rewarding time to get out on the water. The most important thing to an enjoyable day of winter fly fishing is dressing for the weather. After decades of winter activities like hiking, hunting and fishing you would think I would know better, but one of my worst days fly fishing was because I forgot my wool socks. Not so smart with my cotton socks. So let's take a look at the best approach wintering up for a day of fly fishing.

You've heard it before, but I'll say it again. Layers, layers, and more layers. The most important thing are the correct layers.

Feet
Alright Captain Obvious we know cotton socks don't work, so the best bet is a two layer approach with your feet. I first put on a thin polyester wicking sock. Overtop of the polyester sock I use a classic ragg merino wool sock. Bigger can be better, but make sure you can still get into your boots comfortably. If your socks are too thick and your feet are too tight in the boot this will not help keep you warm. What you are trying to accomplish is wicking away the perspiration from your feet with the polyester sock to the wool sock.

Legs and lower body
Winter Fly FishingAgain layers are the way to go. Keeping your legs and lower body warm while in the water is a non- negotiable. A few years ago I ended up getting a pair of Simms Guide Mid Pants. These pants are made of fleece and provide greater insulation than cotton. I would imagine you can get a decent pair of tapered fleece pants online that will do the trick. I like the tapered pants as they bunch up less at your ankles when you get into your boots. Often I'll wear a pair of light polyester long pants overtop of the fleece pants. A few ways to approach this but I'd avoid the cotton sweat pants.

Upper body
I generally have a three layer approach to the upper body. I use synthetic polyester base layer for wicking. I like the Under Armour mock longsleves. Offers a good base from the arms to the neck. The middle layers are your main insulators and going to keep you warm. A couple layers of fleece or wool always work for me. I found a great fleece shirt at Walmart for $10 a couple of years ago and is my goto whenever I head outside. A good down vest can work too, but you don't want too much bulk. The number of layers and type is really up to you and the temperatures you expect to encounter.

Finally for your upper body is a good outer shell. The key is something that will keep the wind from getting to you. With the layers you have already put on, a big winter coat is not best step here. A winter windstopper shell that is water repentant is the answer. This is the place I would invest my money. I have an older Simms windstopper jacket that works great and think I spent $200 at the time. With layering this jacket works from October thru April for me. Today I would look at the Simms Bulkley Jacket ($300) or Cabela's Guidewear WindStopper Jacket (on sale for $110, but not water repentant). Specific fly fishing wading jackets are usually cut short in length and make it easier fitting into your waders. Once you are dressed and have your waders on you want warmth, but also upper body mobility too.

The other stuff
Fingerless gloves or mittens are a must. Plenty of good options made of wool, fleece and polyester. Leave the ski gloves for the slopes. Last but not least is a wool hat.

You really should try all this gear on before you go to the stream. Adding a few more layers may cause some difficulties getting onto your fly fishing boots and waders. The holidays don't help either. No sense having all the right gear if you can't fit into your waders. I enjoy my fly fishing backpack this time of year with layers I am taking off or adding on. Finally, even if you don't think you'll need it, bring an extra layer to leave in the car.
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 12/08/2014 (391 reads)
For those adventurous anglers with a penchant for photography our sponsors at Montana Angler are offering a unique opportunity to join photographer Patrick Clayton at their partner lodges in either Argentina or Chile in April for the upcoming 2015 South American fishing season. Patrick is better known as the “Fish Eye Guy” and his dramatic images of wild trout and salmon in their natural environment has captured the imagination of fly fisherman and conservation groups alike.

Fish Eye Guy


Patrick’s work has been featured by Patagonia, Field and Stream, The Drake, Orvis, The Flyfish Journal, and Catch Magazine, among many others. His work has also been used extensively by conservation groups across the country including national and local Trout Unlimited chapters, The Nature Conservancy, National Wildlife Federation,American Rivers, Greater Yellowstone Coalition, Trout Magazine, California Trout, Western Environmental Law Center, and Western Rivers Conservancy. His photography was also featured in the movie “The Breach“, an exploration of the decline of salmon in the Northwest.

Fish Eye Guy


Patrick will be basing out of two Orvis endorsed lodges in Patagonia during the month of April, the Carrileufu River Lodge in Argentina and Magic Waters Patagonia in Chile. He will be at Magic Waters in Chile the weeks of April 4th and 11th and at Carrileufu River Lodge the weeks of April 18th and 25th . Guests can join for as short as one week or as long as two weeks - combining both countries can also be arranged by Montana Angler.

Patagonia is famous for its aquarium clear rivers and will provide the perfect backdrop for Patrick’s work. Guests on the trip will have the opportunity to see how the Fish Eye Guy captures these magical images with remote underwater cameras. Patrick will also be photographing the general landscape as well as images of fishing in action. Guests that join will receive many of Patrick’s images including photos of their own fishing in action! Patrick will also offer tips and instruction for those that want to take their own photography to the next level.

Carrileufu River Lodge

The Carrileufu River Lodge is located on the boundary of the spectacular Los Alceras National Park in Argentina. The rivers in this area are some of the most beautiful in the world. Many of the rivers drain expansive lakes the filter out the sediments which produces incredible water clarity. The Rivadavia is considered by many to be the most beautiful trout river on the planet and is just 30 minutes from the lodge in the National Park. Guests will enjoy a variety of fly fishing experiences including float trips on legendary rivers, wading spring creeks and large lakes with massive trout. There is also an option to extend the trip with a wilderness 3 day float camping trip.

South American  fly fishing


Magic Waters Patagonia Lodge

If you are looking for the ultimate fishing variety in one of the world’s most beautiful but yet lightly fished regions then look no further than the Magic Waters Patagonia Lodge in Chile. The fishing out of Magic Waters is truly spectacular – plan on fishing a different water on each day of the trip – mostly with huge dry flies! The waters include large gin clear rivers, small spring creeks, wilderness streams and dramatic glacial lakes. This smaller lodge provides a wonderful gateway into the rich Patagonian culture of Southern Chile.

Please contact Brian McGeehan if you are interested in joining this unique experience with Patrick or if you have any questions about the trip. Montana Angler offers domestic fly fishing trips in Montana and Yellowstone National Park as well as international trips to Argentina, Chile and the Bahamas.

Patrick Clayton's work can also be viewed at his website and facebook pages:


South American  fly fishing
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 12/01/2014 (521 reads)
By Salmonoid

For the past eight years or so, I've managed to make it out to fish on Thanksgiving Day. I guess it has become a bit of a tradition, made possible by our decision to no longer travel during the Thanksgiving holiday. Spending a few too many hours going nowhere between New Stanton and Breezewood on the Turnpike will eventually lead one to that conclusion.

This year, I was looking forward my outing, but the forecast was calling for snow the day before, so I started to temper my expectations as the week went along. Wednesday, the snow started falling around 9AM and continued to fall for the next eleven hours. While the ground is still relatively warm, we still ended up with four or more inches, but by evening, the outside sounds were filled with constant dripping. Overnight temps were supposed to dip below freezing too, and I did not have the luxury of waiting until afternoon to fish, since Thanksgiving meal was scheduled for 1PM.

So I told my wife that I would enjoy my day anyway, just thankful that I have the ability to be out walking around in the snow. Since I've never really had stellar outings on Thanksgiving Day, and since the conditions were far from ideal (snow melt, air temperatures below freezing, water levels low, and I added crystal-clear when I arrived Thursday morning), I really wasn't expecting much.





I only managed to fish the stream I was at one other time this year, in mid-January. It must have been a temporary thaw from our Arctic blast, or I was starting to go stir-crazy and needed to get out then. As I was walking in, I noticed quite a bit more blowdown of trees and I remembered the ice storm we had. I've seen the effects of the storm on a number of streams, but had yet to venture out on this particular stream to see how it fared. A number of new deep holes had formed where woody debris created new scour patterns and a number of rock ledge holes had filled in. Hopefully, the new holes will provide protection and cover for the fish for a few years, before the woody debris is blown out in a flood event.




Anyway, things got off to a slow start, as expected. I did not even see a fish for the first forty-five minutes. But then my fortunes changed. There's a spot where a large boulder sits in the middle of the stream. Usually the stream flows equally around each side of the boulder before tumbling into a nice plunge pool at its base. But some of the winter's blowdown had effectively dammed the right side, redirecting all the flow to the left. A plucky little brown darted out from the base of the left side flow and as I lifted him out of the water, he long distance released into the plunge pool below. At the head of the boulder, I landed the first official catch of the day.




The action continued fairly consistently all morning. Each potential hole had a trout or two in it, and it never pays to overlook the pocket water, riffles and unlikely looking water in between. Some of the larger fish came from areas that I wouldn't have selected, but they are the fish, not me.




There are lots of larger boulders, which provide nice holding areas for fish. A young family watched me toy with and finally hook and land a nice little brown from this hole. He lives under the large rock on the left side.






There are big spot fish in this stream and small spot fish in this stream. Here is one of the small spotters.




And a medium spotter.




And a large spotter. With a big tail.






A half-and-half spotter (red/black).




This guy will hopefully be able to take advantage of some of the new woody debris holes, for cover. He apparently had a bout with a heron recently.










Of course, by this time in the morning, I was only about half way through the section I wanted to fish. And I was down to about half an hour to fish, so I started pool hopping. I know I passed a lot of fish by, but the last few fish I caught were special.

A log had fallen across the stream at this spot a number of years ago. The flow had originally been to the right side, but had flipped to the left side sometime in the past year.





I cast first to the right side. There still was a tiny bit of flow through the pool and at least one brown had decided to make it his home. A small black mass charged out from after the log; I thought the fish would be under the rock in the pool.



I released him and he swam back to his abode. I flipped over to the pool on the left side of the stream, where the main flow was. I missed a smaller fish on the first cast, but prospected the pool a few more times. I never figured out where this fish was holding, but it doesn't get much more buttery than this!

Still had some faint parr marks.




And that was pretty much it. I think I caught one more, but I made the decision to try and honor Thanksgiving Dinner start time and managed to make it there just fashionably late, at 1:15PM.

Turned out to be my best Thanksgiving Day outing ever, despite snow (and melt), freezing temperatures, and low, clear conditions. It was a wonderful day to be out, although I was dodging snowballs part of the day, as it warmed and the trees released their coverings. One of the more interesting things I encountered was hearing voices on the hike in. In a few seconds, I came upon two Amish guys sitting underneath a big rock, taking swigs from a Thermos. We nodded polite hellos and I went on my way. I didn't catch anything bigger than 12", but I love the variety in spots, patterns, and coloration of these freestone wild browns.

Join the conversation about this in the forum here
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 11/18/2014 (765 reads)
Who would of guessed pink would be the favorite color for the new Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission’s (PFBC) 2015 fishing license button?

2015-pink-buttonx140There were almost 5,000 votes cast online this fall, and by a significant number decided that pink was the new favorite color. I guess if the NFL can sport some pink shoes an angler show off a pink button. It turns out teal and green were in the hunt.

“Once again this year, our anglers have voted and told us what color they would like to have for the 2015 button,” said PFBC Executive Director John Arway. “With nearly 35 percent of the votes, pink was the favorite among the seven available colors.”

Buttons go on sale December 1 and are available for $5 each. They can be purchased through the PFBC's online store (The Outdoor Shop), PFBC regional offices, and through the network of license issuing agents.

More details can be found at the PFBC website.
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 11/05/2014 (1365 reads)
I know I post a lot of Hank's Youtube video's, but compared to talking about wind knots they are pretty funny. So here is the trailer to Hanks' new film, "Hank Patterson's Reel Montana Adventure" and some info on how you could be the talk of your town by hosting a screening of your own.

Gonna have to look into hosting a screening for the Paflyfish Jam!

Snap It! -Hank



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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 10/16/2014 (7589 reads)
fall fly fishing


Fall fly fishing in the the region offers plenty of great opportunities. The cooler weather offers anglers some solitude of fly fishing while many are caught up with other fall activities. A little bit of preparation can be a rewarding opportunity for those who can make the time.

Reproduction plays an important part of the trout lifecycle during the fall months for both brook and brown trout. Brook trout, native to the US, usually begin to spawn during late September through October. Brown trout typically start spawning in October through late November. I have seen this go later too.

During the spawn coloring on the trout will intensify especially in the males. Females will often create gravel beds for the fertilized eggs called redds. It very important to be careful of these sections on streams when you see redds and not to kick them up when walking. Probably best even to leave trout overtop redds alone and give them a chance to protect the eggs.

fall fly fishingOften the water in the fall is low and gin clear. Spotting trout on a redd is pretty easy to see as in the photo to the left. The trout will sit over top of a small group of rocks that they have knocked around and they often will have a little more cleaned up look as if someone kicked up the spot. Take a little time before marching into the stream to check on the conditions. Good advice for any day.

As the trout begin to change so does the entomology or insect life in the stream. Activity will be different from region to region, stream size, earlier summer water temperatures, and geology. The fall provides a more limited selection of insects and often anglers enjoy bringing a more modest selection of flies and imitations. Some of the more popular collections include: Slate Drakes, BWO, Caddis, midges and terrestrials. Typical nymphs and streamers are very successful smart choice as well.

I like Dave Weavers suggestions for even looking for rainbows behind the redds feeding on eggs. Some small simple egg patterns can produce some pretty good results for these rainbows. The most common color for natural trout eggs are cream, pale orange and pink.

The full and fast spring streams can take a new characteristic once September arrives. Low clear water can create a challenge for some anglers, but stealth and patience can provide many rewards.

With summer holder over trout and newly stocked trout in many streams there should be ample opportunity for solitude and fish in autumn. Check out the PaFlyFish forums and stream reports to learn more about what is happening in your area.






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Published by Andy [The_Sasquatch] on 10/07/2014 (927 reads)
This year we tried something new with the annual Quill Gordon Summit-we bumped to the Fall in hopes of better fishing. I would say the move was the right thing to do. The conditions were tough in God's Country, as water was low and gin clear in most every place we went. Despite tough conditions, everyone was able to find trout and the fishing was much better than it had been when we had our summit in the Spring. Mid to late April is simply too early to have great fishing in the Potter/Tioga/Clinton area.

God's CountryMy dad, Sal, and I arrived at camp around 9am on Thursday after what was possibly the fastest stop in at Sandfly's shop, Big Meadow Fly Shop, in history. Camp was in good shape, and we unpacked, got the cabin's heat and plumbing up and running, and Skybay arrived around 11:30am. He didn't even unpack his car. We headed straight for the first stream of the weekend.

The hike in was beautiful. We split into 2 groups. On the first stream, there's a series of beaver ponds. My dad and I cut off the trail at the first pond and fished upstream. Skybay and Sal headed up a way to the second pond and fished downstream. I picked up a nice brownie in the first pond, but because of the low, clear conditions, that was the only trout we were able to pick up. Sal and Skybay met us halfway between the two ponds, and fishing was slow for everyone. After hiking out, we headed straight for Lyman Run. We dropped Sal off at the beaver pond just upstream of Thompson Rd, and Skbay, my dad, and myself drove further upstream and met Sal in the middle. Lyman fished a little better. The three of us all picked up some small brookies and brownies, nothing of great size. Sal picked up two absolutely beautifuly brookies out of the beaver pond and just below.

We arrived back at camp to find Artifishal sitting around the fire ring playing guitar and enjoying a quiet evening on top of Denton Hill. Bikerfish, Night Stalker, and Wetfly01 all arrived Thursday evening, and plenty of good beer and food was had.

The next day we headed south and fished the Kettle Creek watershed. We began on Cross Fork. Wetfly divided us up into 4 groups of 2, broke us off into 4 different sections of the creek with two cars between each of the two groups, and we all covered some serious water upstream. Again, conditions were low and clear, but everyone got into some nice fish. It was a good mix of brookies and brownies, and from what I understand a few nice holdover bows made their way upstream as well. After fishing Cross Fork, we headed over to Kettle. Wetfly, Skybay, Night Stalker, and Artificial fished up through Ole Bull. Dad, Sal, Biker and I fished at Oleona with two of us going downstream, and two going upstream. Fishing on Kettle was solid the whole way. Lots of good sized fish were taken.

Back at camp, we found newer board member Brutus waiting for us. He had arrived a little earlier, headed out to Genessee Fork for a bit, and had just enough time to drink half a beer before Biker, Sal, dad and I pulled in. Then the waiting began...we sat around camp waiting and waiting for the other group of guys. I'll let others in that group tell this story, needless to say it involved Skybay, the deep dark woods of Ole Bull State Park, a policeman and a speeding ticket. More beer and food flowed Friday night. DaveS also popped in for a night of food and beer on his way up to the Upper D to fish with Krayfish.

God's CountrySaturday the temps were cold in the AM, so none of us were pushing to get out the door. It had rained most of the night before, so water was a bit better. Dave took off around 9am for the Upper D, the rest of us got out around 10am or maybe a bit later. Most of the guys headed down to fish the big Pine. Some fished in Gaines, others a little further up. Wetfly and I fished a smaller stream and man we got into it. Lots of brownies and brookies, all the browns were SOLID. We met up in Ansonia around 3pm. The plan was to fish the big waters all together, but Wetfly and I decided to go back to a lower section of the same stream we fished in the AM. Glad we did because we hit it good. Solid browns, all over 12", fat and buttered up, great runs and deep pools, some were taken on dries, some on my dropper, and the flows were solid on this stream. This is a stream that we will certainly focus on next year We learned of several solid stretches, and we plan on doing a similar setup like we did on Cross Fork this year.

The other guys were able to get into some trout on the big water as well. A few big fallfish, rainbows, and browns were taken. Saturday nigh ended with some epic burgers, more beer, and good times.

A few guys stopped on the way home on Sunday to fish, they'll have to give their reports. I'm particularly interested in hearing how Artificial did on a certain small stream that flows behind Coudersport.

This was by far the best fishing we've had at the NCPA summits. We have decided the first weekend in October will be the date for next year, so clear the calendars. Bow hunters, wait til the 2nd week to go out and get to this summit. The comments were made at how affordable this is. Your lodging is pretty much free (by donation to my family's hunting club), everyone brings plenty of food and beer, its an issue of getting to the cabin.

Next year's jam is officially titled the "Where's Jared Summit" because that seemed to be a common question throughout the whole weekend. Gotta love Skybay. He keeps us all entertained!

We're gathering the pictures from the weekend. There will be plenty of fish porn posted soon.

Follow more photographs and comments in the forum thread.
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 09/25/2014 (721 reads)
Todd Bowersox, of the Allegheny River Fly Fishing Company (ARFF) will be airing a new radio and podcast program this fall. Bowersox will discover all things wild in the Pennsylvania focussed in the outdoor themed broadcast. Program topics will include fly fishing, hunting, hiking, biking, camping, kayaking, music, art, and special events in the wilds of northwest Pennsylvania. Into the PAWilds will also feature local and state TU chapter efforts, a conservation minute during every show and a "tips & tricks in the weekly program.

Upcoming Schedule
Week 1 - October 4: Fall steelhead fishing and fly fishing on the Allegheny.
Week 2 - 10/11 - Wing Shooting / Dog Training with Stephen Witcoski

Into the PAWilds will be airing weekly on Saturdays beginning October 4th for 30 minutes at 10:00 am on 104.3 FM Kinzua Country, Warren PA and follow the program on Facebook.




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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 09/17/2014 (2334 reads)
The 2nd Annual Pennsylvania Fly Casting Competition was held at the Carlisle Events Outdoor Show at the Carlisle Fairgrounds on September 6. Contestants were challenged for accuracy and distance events in several different skill categories. In the distance component, casters earned points for the length of their casts and had to place their flies within a narrow 10-feet wide lane. Accuracy casting required contestants to land their flies within 30-inch and 54-inch target rings at random ranges between 25 to 60 feet.

fly castingDerek Eberly of East Petersburg, Pennsylvania, was overall high scorer as well as champion in the Expert Division. Eberly also achieved high score in accuracy casting.

Dave "Old Lefty" Rothrock of Jersey Shore, Pennsylvania, earned second place in the Expert Division and also made the longest cast of the day at 100 feet. Ranking third among the Expert casters was Eric "stenonema" Richard of New Bloomfield, Pennsylvania.

Angler Division first place went to Tom Miller of Carlisle, Pennsylvania. Darren Wishard of Hagerstown, Maryland, took second place among the Anglers, and Rod Cross of Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, was third.

Two contestants competed in the Youth Division this year. DaCota Leader of Everett, Pennsylvania, was the Youth champion. Second place went to William Sweger of Landisburg, Pennsylvania. Congratulations to these two young fly casters for competing.

The competition was organized and conducted by the Cumberland Valley Chapter of Trout Unlimited, the Chesapeake Council of the International Federation of Fly Fishers, and the Antietam Fly Anglers.

A special thanks to Chris "Artifishal" Haag (pictured above) for help getting some of the photographs and event info together for me. Photo by Ken Tidy.
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