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Published by Maurice Chioda [Maurice] on 11/30/2017 (746 reads)
Fly fishing during the winter can be an enjoyable endeavor if you put some effort into finding where the wily trout feed during the cold water temperatures. An important “hatch” in winter is that of the early black and brown stoneflies.

Stoneflies both little and large are the canary in the coal mine for water quality. They are one of the first species to disappear on impaired streams. They thrive as nymphs in highly oxygenated fast moving waters like rapids or heavy riffles and often where the thick moss grows on the rocks. I presume this helps them keep their footing while foraging on the bottom in the fast water. This is where I always find them and where I look for them to be effective when fishing larger freestone streams.

"Little Winter Stones" Illustration by Dave Weaver
"Little Winter Stones" Illustration by Dave Weaver


Limestone spring creeks are slow moving with low gradient and few if any riffles over their short length. This is why you don’t see them in great numbers there. Larger freestone streams are more likely to get too warm in summer and are not great fall or winter trout streams, unless they receive a fall stocking or have a limestone spring influence (i.e. Penns Creek).

So where you find little black stonefly "hatches" to be prolific you likely are not fishing because they are mainly stocked trout streams. And few are stocked in fall or winter after the summer "trout drought."

Their onstream behavior is an egg laying, more than a mating ritual or traditional hatch. That's why they are seen as solitary, usually downstream and across courses where the fly daps the water or skitters. If you observe their behavior and how the fish take them it’s pretty easy to mimmick but it is not a typical mayfly behavior to be sure. But it is similar to caddis fly egg laying.

This hatch is more like fishing a streamer or a wetfly that doesn't sink. I really enjoy this hatch and fish it with a #16 black bodied Henryville special with a Z-lon wing. Sometimes I trail a black bodied soft hackle on a dead drift while waiting for the initial reaction strike and then I slowly lift and drop the rod tip as the fly swings across the slower waters where the stoneflies lay their eggs. Most of the strikes come on the swing to be sure.

If you see half a dozen at a time in the air and hitting the water at a time during a still, sunny period of the day, you've hit it right.

There are several stonefly species that hatch in the winter/early spring. The tiny winter black / snowflies, aka needle flies that are smaller and hatch in the middle of winter are a good example. You can often see them crawling on the banks in the snow.

Usually a little later in the winter to early spring, the early brown and black stoneflies hatch. They are a little larger.

I have had little success fishing the tiny winter blacks vs the early brown and black (nymph or dry). The main reason, in my opinion, is the lower water temps in mid winter vs. late winter when the days are longer and temps warmer. But to be sure, often the best results come on sunny, snowy days with temps above 45 degrees, regardless of the water temp.

So find a big freestone stream with a fall/winter stocking of brown trout (more likely to rise) and on a warm sunny day in the winter/late winter, January through March. Swing ‘em if ya got ‘em.
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Published by Tom C. [afishinado] on 11/26/2017 (735 reads)
There are quite a few beginners on the board so I thought I would post a little on how I approach a day on the stream. I would be very interested to read about how others on the board approach a day of FLy Fishing.

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The success or failure of a day on the stream (although no day on the stream is really a failure…unless you drown I guess) is often determined before you even leave home. I check flows and temps on the USGS; conditions can differ in certain areas and streams. For example, if the water is high or low, perhaps a more stable stream like a limestoner would be a better choice. I also check the weather and find out the temperature high and low, cloud cover or sun, and rainfall info. I include all this info to make my decision on where to fish.

In addition, If I’m planning to fish an ATW, I will check of the PFBC site for stocking info. Actually, I’m not really a white truck chaser, quite the opposite. I try to avoid freshly stocked fish because I hate the crowds they attract, and I really don’t like fishing for freshly stocked fish, but that’s just me. Some may even use the Internet to find some hotspots (believe it or not!). IMO, posting a good report about a certain stream does attract anglers, especially in the short term. Again, I often do the opposite, if the word is out on hot fishing on a certain stream, I’ll often try to guess where the least amount of pressure is, and choose accordingly. Hatch info on the Internet is useful though. Even if the reports are from a different stream, I can “interpolate” and guess what’s hatching on some streams I know.

Once I pick where I want to fish, if it’s not an all-day trip, my next decision is when to fish; morning, afternoon or evening? As a general rule, in the winter the warmest time of day (afternoon) is usually the best, and in the summer the coolest (early am or pm) is usually best. Also I think about the hatches, for example with Hendrickson’s, I want to be on the stream mid-morning to early afternoon, but if sulphurs are hatching, I would plan a late-afternoon/evening trip, etc.

Okay you make your decision on the stream to fish based on flow, temp, weather, hatches, etc. and you’re there. Now what? I usually cruise around the stream in my truck a bit to check out the different parking areas and sections to evaluate stream conditions, fishing pressure, rising fish, etc., and I pick a spot based on what I’ve found.

_CDK1236


It’s best to go to the stream bank before you rig up and decide what would be best to start with. Of course, if there’s rising fish, I would try to determine what insect is hatching and how/where the fish are taking it. Ideally I would capture an insect first. If I can’t capture one, I’ll at least try to ID the type of insect (mayfly, caddisfly, stonefly, midge) and estimate the size and color. Often I will tie on a dry with an emerger, pupa or unweighted nymph on a dropper to see what they are taking. I will continue to try to capture an insect with my little insect net while I’m fishing. I will change flies and presentations until I hit it right.

In non-hatch situations you must “prospect” to find the fish. Some FFers start with streamers first to find fish. It is a good way to locate fish, but since it’s my least favorite type of fishing, I will nymph first in non-hatch situations. I usually will try two or three nymphs or a nymph(s) and a wet. I most often will tie on a weighted generic nymph like a Hares Ear or a Phesant Tail nymph along with a nymph that matches what should be hatching in the stream. I will usually stick with the generic pattern and change off the other fly or flies until I find the fly combo that works.

Also, it is important to fish in different types of water to try to hone in on where the fish are, or at least where the feeding fish are located. I will probe the riffs, runs, tails and heads of pools, deep pools. I use all types of nymphing methods depending on the water: euro, high-sticking, indies, etc. If I begin to catch fish in a certain water-type, I try to seek out similar spots and concentrate on them. If fish begin rising, I will go to my hatch-matching mode as described earlier.

If nothing is happening after fishing through all types of water with nymphs, I may switch over the streamer tactics or wet flies to cover a lot of water and find fish. As mentioned earlier, it’s a great way to locate fish. Also, there are times where dries work well even when nothing is rising. A dry dropper can be a deadly combo especially in low flows. In addition, small brook trout streams are one of the few places where I will start the day (and usually end the day) using dries to prospect.

Sometimes fish are feeding, but not on the surface. Signs of this are fish flashing or seeing a fish holding and feeding in mid depth areas. In this case I will try wet flies or emergers and drift, swing or retrieve it to get some strikes.

_CDK9712-Edit


In a nutshell, try fishing all types of water, at all depths (including on top) with different types of flies and presentations until you begin catching fish. Just remember there are no magic flies or techniques, and often many will work.

Not long ago I fished the Breeches. As usual, there were quite a few anglers on the stream. I worked my way downstream and caught fish regularly using a nymph rig. A guy working behind me was catching fish stripping a bugger, and the guy below me was catching fish on midges. Some days a lot of things work, while other days, nothing seems to work. I keep trying different stuff in different spots until I either catch fish, it’s too dark to see, or my wife calls to find out where the heck I’m at!
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Published by Dave Weaver [Dave_W] on 11/16/2017 (932 reads)
The chart below includes the total number of all macroinvertebrates in seine. The July sample in Letort may have been impacted by dense weeds producing a reduced number.

Screen Shot 2017-11-16 at 8.04.10 AM


This survey sought to identify macroinvertebrate populations in three different central PA stream types over the course of a year for the purpose of shedding light on nymph populations that might be of interest to fly fishermen. Three streams were chosen reflecting a freestone stream (Conococheague), a semi-limestoner (Yellow Breeches), and a limestoner (Letort).

I attempted to ensure that each kick seine survey was done in as close to the exact spot in the riffle each time I conducted the survey. These surveys were done in January, April, July, and early November. Although I don’t claim that this effort was entirely scientific, the results do shed some light on nymph numbers and characteristics. Moreover, the results bear out fly fishing conventional wisdom: that nymphs are more numerous and larger in springtime. In all three streams, the macro biomass was highest in April. The graph above reveals the fluctuation in the riffle by season. Of note, the Letort far exceeded the other streams in total biomass, although as one would expect, this difference was largely due to scuds and cress bugs. If one were to break out scuds and cress bugs from Letort, the number of nymphs would have been less than Conococheague. If you’re a limestone stream nympher, Letort in particular, scud and cress bug patterns are well known for a reason.

Among general observations of the streams’ combined results that I think merit note are a couple things:

1. The relative scarcity of stoneflies and caddis compared to the much more numerous mayflies.

2. The generally small size of these nymphs throughout the seasons, but especially in summer and fall. Most of these bugs averaged only about a quarter of an inch or less in body length (not counting tails) and would be imitated on hooks around #18 or less. Only the rare stoneflies and a few of the largest march browns would match a #14 nymph hook.

For comparison, the images below show the relative difference in size of nymphs in Yellow Breeches in April (upper image) and late November (lower image).

For more detailed information with bug numbers broken out by species and discussion, please feel free to check out the discussion in the Hatch and Entomology forum here.


Screen Shot 2017-11-16 at 8.04.33 AM

Screen Shot 2017-11-16 at 8.04.42 AM
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Published by Dave Weaver [Dave_W] on 10/31/2017 (1262 reads)
Susquehanna River, Lancaster Co., 10/21/17

WEATHER: Blue bird skies with highs in the 70s.

WATER: 3.2' at the Harrisburg gauge, gin clear, 60 degrees. A few boaters and yakkers but not a lot of activity.

HATCHES ETC: Nothing significant. A few scattered bugs, no rises; large schools of small minnows around 2" in length around shoreline areas. No crayfish seen. One bass caught in a riffle today had multiple caddis larva in his mouth and gullet. These caddis were dark colored and about #16.

Teamed up with Afishinado today to put some autumn hurtin on the Susky bass.
We arrived at mid day about 11am and fished until 5:30pm. It was a tough day. The bright sun and very clear water seemed to have the river switched off. We fished some very good sections with little success. Around 4pm, with the sun lower in the sky and softened by haze, the river seemed to wake up. We found active fish in fast water, mostly along current seams but also in shallow riffles. I had expected to find SMBs around ledge rock and and deeper tailouts today, but these spots didn't produce. The active fish were in pretty fast water. Had luck high sticking a helgy nymph and swinging a Clouser. I tried poppers briefly with no success. I managed about eight fish with three in the mid teens. Afish got fifteen bass with one at 18 inches.

A very nice day to be outside, but fishing was sub-par for what I'd expect on the big river in October. Nevertheless, with water levels still quite low, if you're a wading angler, the Susky is in great shape for FFing right now.

Members can follow along with comments in the forum here.

"Susquehanna>


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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 10/26/2017 (1130 reads)
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SINTRIX 440 blank construction
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 10/05/2017 (1546 reads)
By Brian McGeehan at Montana Angler Fly Fishing

September in the greater Yellowstone region is quickly becoming one of the most popular times to visit and fish. September is a great time to fish Yellowstone National Park because water temperatures are dropping into the optimal range and trout feel the urge to pack on the pounds for the upcoming winter. Weather in September is usually very pleasant with cool, crisp mornings and warm afternoons. September is the only month of the year when literally every river in the Park is fishable. The Madison drainage has cooled enough for productive fishing but the high country streams are still warm enough for fish to be active. Throw in a few bugling elk and some fall colors and you have the recipe for a great trip. Let’s take a look at some of the highlights of September fishing in the park.

ynp_madison_fall_2016-35




Firehole River

As the weather cools, the Firehole once again becomes a viable option for fishing. At the beginning of the month, it may only be cool enough to fish in the mornings, but by the middle of September it should fish well all day. The main attraction during September is the White Miller Caddis, which typically emerges from mid morning until early afternoon. On cloudy days, especially towards the end of September, Blue Winged Olives emerge in the middle of the day. When no hatch is present, swing soft hackles through the riffles. I prefer drab, generic flies like a soft hackle pheasant tail or hare’s ear. In the fall, primarily due to low water, the fish in a Firehole can be a bit pickier than they were in June. Downsize your tackle a bit and take care not to spook fish with your movements.

Madison River
The main attraction on the Madison River in Yellowstone Park in the fall is the run of fish out of Hebgen Lake. While this run peaks in October and November, there will usually be some fish in the system in the latter part of September. The best way to target these fish is by nymphing or by swinging a streamer in a down and across fashion. No matter the technique, the key to catching these fish is locating where they are holding. These fish are used to a lake environment, so look for deeper, slower water. When nymphing, I prefer a stonefly nymph as my lead fly and small, nondescript mayfly pattern as my dropper. If I am swinging a streamer, I like the intruder style patterns that are popular with steelhead fishermen.

Lamar Valley- Lamar River, Slough Creek, Soda Butte Creek
Fall fishing in the Lamar Valley can be challenging due to low water and the cumulative effect of fishing pressure throughout the summer. On sunny, warm days turn to small terrestrials like ants or micro hoppers. On cloudy days, especially towards the end of the month, look for mayfly hatches of Blue Winged Olives or Tan Drakes. Plan on fishing a 5x leader that is a few feet longer than your standard 9ft length.

Yellowstone River
The Yellowstone River inside the park is a nice option in September as it falls off the radar for many once the famous stonefly hatches have ended. The river hosts an excellent Blue Winged Olive hatch, especially on cloudy days and towards the latter part of the month. Hopper patterns and attractors will still be your bread and butter for much of the month. September is a good time to start working in mayfly style attractors such as a purple haze or parachute adams as the fish may be a bit more selective than they were in July and August. A small streamer will fill the void if the dry fly bite slows.

Gardner River
The entire Gardner River should fish well in September, as the section below the Boiling River will have cooled sufficiently for all day fishing. In the early mornings, I like to nymph fish with a stonefly trailed by a attractor pattern like a prince or copper john. As the day heats up, small hoppers and various attractor patterns are your go to. Cloudy days will see hatches of Blue Winged Olives. Remember that the Boiling River essentially creates two separate rivers. Fall mayfly hatches will appear above in the cooler water first while hopper and attractor fishing will hold on longer in the warmer waters below. During the fall, keep in mind that there is always the possibility of a surprise up from the Yellowstone.

Fall fishing is truly one of our favorite windows for both Montana and Yellowstone National Park. Cool mornings and warm afternoons often produce the perfect blend of ideal water temperatures coupled with fall hatches and late season terrestrial fishing. The general family vacation season has slowed dramatically leaving the park to more serious anglers.

Brian McGeehan is a Pennsylvania native and has been guiding Western rivers in Montana, Wyoming and Colorado for 19 seasons. He is a licensed Montana outfitter and owner of Montana Angler Fly Fishing based in Bozeman, MT.
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 08/28/2017 (26435 reads)
fall fly fishing


Fall fly fishing in the the region offers plenty of great opportunities. The cooler weather offers anglers some solitude of fly fishing while many are caught up with other fall activities. A little bit of preparation can be a rewarding opportunity for those who can make the time.

Reproduction plays an important part of the trout lifecycle during the fall months for both brook and brown trout. Brook trout, native to the US, usually begin to spawn during late September through October. Brown trout typically start spawning in October through late November. I have seen this go later too.

During the spawn coloring on the trout will intensify especially in the males. Females will often create gravel beds for the fertilized eggs called redds. It very important to be careful of these sections on streams when you see redds and not to kick them up when walking. Probably best even to leave trout overtop redds alone and give them a chance to protect the eggs.

fall fly fishingOften the water in the fall is low and gin clear. Spotting trout on a redd is pretty easy to see as in the photo to the left. The trout will sit over top of a small group of rocks that they have knocked around and they often will have a little more cleaned up look as if someone kicked up the spot. Take a little time before marching into the stream to check on the conditions. Good advice for any day.

As the trout begin to change so does the entomology or insect life in the stream. Activity will be different from region to region, stream size, earlier summer water temperatures, and geology. The fall provides a more limited selection of insects and often anglers enjoy bringing a more modest selection of flies and imitations. Some of the more popular collections include: Slate Drakes, BWO, Caddis, midges and terrestrials. Typical nymphs and streamers are very successful smart choice as well.

I like Dave Weavers suggestions for even looking for rainbows behind the redds feeding on eggs. Some small simple egg patterns can produce some pretty good results for these rainbows. The most common color for natural trout eggs are cream, pale orange and pink.

The full and fast spring streams can take a new characteristic once September arrives. Low clear water can create a challenge for some anglers, but stealth and patience can provide many rewards.

With summer holder over trout and newly stocked trout in many streams there should be ample opportunity for solitude and fish in autumn. Check out the PaFlyFish forums and stream reports to learn more about what is happening in your area.






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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 07/13/2017 (7602 reads)
Fly fishing anglers can pursue many types of freshwater fish in the region including bass, carp and sunfish. Undoubtedly, fly fishing for trout is by far the most popular. Millions of brook trout, brown trout and rainbow trout are stocked in the Northeast every year. Aside from state and local club stocking efforts, all three species can be found naturally reproducing with varying degrees of success as well.

Trout flourish in waters that sustain fertile, cooler conditions year-round. Pollution has had an obvious negative impact on the success of wild trout populations. Many streams with high acidity or low levels of pH in mining regions have had a difficult time sustaining trout populations. Brook trout especially are the most tolerant of these conditions however their presence was greatly diminished during the twentieth century by deforestation and subsequent warmer water temperatures. Pollution spills that wiped out the insect life have been equally as devastating to trout populations. With improved conservation efforts and time, wild trout are making a strong comeback.

Better water conditions provide improved fertility in a stream so that young trout can feed on plankton, small crustaceans and insects. Mature trout will eat insects, fish, salamanders, crustaceans and even small mammals. Fly fishing for trout requires a keen knowledge of habitat, trout food and the fish. There are differences on how to fly fish for wild vs stocked trout.

Let's take a look at some of the general characteristics you’ll find with the three most common trout found in the northeast region for fly fishing.


Brook Trout - Salvelinus fontinalis
Brook Trout photo by 3wt7X

Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis)
Brook Trout are the only stream trout native to the region. Generally brook trout are found from northern Georgia along the Appalachian Mountains and then north into Maine. They are also found in the Great Lakes–Saint Lawrence system over to Hudson Bay region. During the 19th century brook trout were first introduced throughout the western US. They are the official state fish for New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Michigan, New Hampshire, Vermont, Virginia and West Virginia.

A typical wild brook trout can be 6"-18" inches dependent on habitat, nutrition and age. They are typically the smaller of the three commonly found trout. Brook trout spawn during the fall starting in late September thru November. Of the annual stocking in Pennsylvania by the PFBC less than 20% of the annual stocked trout are brookies. Fly fishing for wild brook trout in small mountainous streams is it’s own pursuit by many.

Habitat: Brook trout generally live in small to moderate-sized streams, lakes, and ponds. They thrive in cool temps (34-72 degrees), clean and well-oxygenated water conditions.

Identification: body coloring is generally dark brown-green, the upper body and top have a wavy or a marbling pattern called vermiculation that extends onto the dorsal fin, the sides and belly shade is lighter, body is marked with light colored or yellow spots with smaller red spots surrounded by a blue halo and white leading edge on pelvic and anal fins.


Brown Trout - Salmo trutta
Brown Trout photo by 3wt7X

Brown Trout (Salmo trutta)
Brown trout are not a native species to the United States and they were introduced from Europe during the 19th century. They have become very successful across the country in many streams and lakes. Wild brown trout are typically larger than the native brook trout and are commonly found 12"-18". Larger brown trout can be found up to 30 inches and some can live well past 15 years. In Pennsylvania, about 1/3 of all streams stocking by the PFBC is with brown trout.

Habitat: Brown trout can be found in a wider range of water conditions. They prefer water temps from 50-60 degrees but can sustain themselves into the lower 70's. They are typically a little less tolerant of low pH conditions as compared to native brook trout.

Identification: body color is surprisingly not brown in color with black and often red spots on the sides, the lower belly section is yellowish, the tail fin typically has no spots.


Rainbow Trout - Oncorhynchus mykiss
Rainbow Trout photo by 3wt7X

Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)
Rainbow Trout are native to the Pacific coast of California to Alaska. Pennsylvania and other east coast states introduced rainbows during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The average size range for rainbow trout is 10"-14" inches, with some individuals reach 20+ inches. Opposite of brown and brook trout, wild rainbow trout spawn in the spring time. There are only a few naturally reproducing populations of rainbow trout on the east coast, but the species does very well in hatcheries and is the predominate species used in stream stocking. In Pennsylvania over 50% of the stocked trout are rainbows.

Habitat: Rainbows, much like brown trout, are a little less tolerant of low ph conditions. It is even suggested they can tolerate temps up to 75 degrees.

Identification: dark-greenish to silver back, red-pink stripe along lateral line, blackish spots on sides, head, dorsal fin and tail

Beginners can follow along and learn more in the Beginners Forum.

Additional Online Resources
http://www.dnr.state.md.us/fisheries/fishfacts/
http://www.fish.state.pa.us/pafish/fishhtms/chap15trout.htm
http://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/7016.html
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 06/06/2017 (2439 reads)
All students across the country get a chance to learn about biology and environmental sciences when attending middle school. However, the students at Tredyffrin/Easttown Middle School (TEMs) have the unique opportunity to actually go beyond the regular curriculum with raising trout in their classroom.

Raceway Trout Basket


The program is led by Mr. Gordon Davis, 7th English/8th science teacher at TEMS. The Trout in the Classroom program at TEMS is supported by the PA Fish and Boat Commission, PA Council of Trout Unlimited and Valley Forge Trout Unlimited.

Along with raising the trout, students learn about the importance of cold-water resources throughout their middle school experience. It is a great fit on the heels of the 6th grade curriculum which studies water resources. In addition, they benefit from learning about the chemical factors affecting water quality.

In the beginning of the school year the students learn about the Pennsylvania state fish, the brook trout. Then, when trout eggs arrive in early November, the “eyed” eggs (where the eyeball and spinal cord is visible in the egg) and the trout are raised through the “fingerling” stage, before being released in early May at an approved trout stream.

Raceway Ray Teaching


As part of the program this year, the students visited a trout raceway, owned by the Chester Valley Sportsmen’s Association. Ray Andrews and other members of the association take care of roughly 5,500 rainbow and brook trout prior to stocking, which they receive from the Carlisle state hatchery.

“Students were able to see a real-world connection to the trout care we practice in the classroom and also study the behaviors of mature trout,” said Mr. Davis

The students are involved in an in-depth program raising the trout that includes exploring YouTube videos posted by anglers which highlight trout fishing across the state. One of the most popular activities this year occurred when the program partner from Valley Forge Trout Unlimited, Dave Dickens, visited to discuss his life spent trout fishing.

Raceway Ray Seated Teaching


The program has enjoyed outstanding support from the school district, community and parents, and is very well known by many. “Mr. Davis is a wonderful teacher and my daughter is tremendously excited about the program,” shared Melissa Kennedy of Berwyn.

For many years Mr. Davis has been enthusiastically supported by the PA TIC program director, Amidea Daniel. He was extremely grateful to the PTO for their support in purchasing materials needed for trout; our Principal, Andy Phillips, for his support of our program; our VFTU representative, Dave Dickens; and our friend, Ray Andrews, for the connections through TIC.

Trout In the Classroom is a partnership between the PA Fish and Boat Commission and PA Council of Trout Unlimited. It was created to introduce students to cold-water resources and the importance of maintaining healthy streams. The partnership provides brook trout eggs, trout food, technical assistance, curriculum connections and teacher workshops each year.
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 05/24/2017 (1997 reads)

IMG_20170519_160156_548
Inside the cabin by TigerTrout4wt (Kevin)

IMG_7589
I went out with Tom Ciannilli on Friday evening to my favorite place on the the Little J. Great night and a classic May Sulphur hatch at about 8:00 pm to close the evening.

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Saturday Dave, Maurice, Tom, Mick and I went over to Penns. A big change in the weather with a cold front dropping the temps into the 50's and some light rain in the morning.

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Dave showing off with catching a nice bow on his first cast in the Class A section of Penns.

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The long and winding trail to fly fish.

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Tom looking kinda serious about his fly.

_DSF1008
We move off the Class A Section and Maurice pulls together another one of his masterful fly fishing tailgating experiences.

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Yeah that is pretty damn good when you've been standing in cold water all day.

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Of course we had an IPA with a trout on it. The bonus was it was 14 proof.

_DSF1064
Back at the Seven Mountains Campground the crew converges after fly fishing all day. Saturday was tough for everyone. The good news is we had some spirits to loosen everyone up and get warm. Some of the attendees for the weekend: JackM and Gino, DaveW, Maurice and Mick, Afishinado (Tom), Aducker (Jeff), pcray1231 (Pat)
DanL, tomgamber - sons Joe and Adam, Swattie87, TigerTrout4wt (Kevin), Bikerfish and Chuck, lestrout (Les) Ace Sedgley (Darby) Pennypack Flyer and friend Jerry, csoult, Bruno, Alby (Greg) & Glenfidich (Don) Trapshooter , chuckyblack09 (Chuck/Charles) Tim Robinsin (Derek), ryguyfi (Ryan) zenherper (Chris)
GenCon, Don Thompson, Paparise (Phil, +2), Captain Hook Bearfish, (Rookie) (Dave), Bopper (Tom) Skybay (Jared), and Shakey!!

_DSF1067
Mick was the winner of Dave Weaver's wonderful painting

_DSF1079
My own personal team of rivals: Jack, Maurice, Dave Kile, Tom, and Dave. The best moderators on the Internet and why we have the community we do!! Thanks guys for all your help.

_DSF1072
Until the next Jam!

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