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Multi Species in the Autumn Transition Zone
Fall Fly Fishing Opportunities in Pennsylvania
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Another Great Fish – Old George
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Fly of the Month: Olive Woolly Bugger
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Published by Dave Weaver [Dave_W] on 10/24/2016 (282 reads)

Below Ramcat Run (acrylic on canvas)
article and images by
Dave Weaver (Dave_W)

Large Pennsylvania streams and rivers in October and November can provide an interesting grab bag of fish that might munch our flies, and big weedless streamers are the way to go. For many Pennsylvania fly fishermen, October and November are months when they return to stream trout fishing, if they ever left. In particular, years such as this one magnify this effect as we have spent what seems like many months waiting for rain and cooler temperatures and are especially eager to get back out for trout. Some fly fishers gave the river bass game a go-round during summer, but soon are back on trout streams as the days get shorter and colder. Few die hard fly fishers stick with bass by late October. Try checking out a mid- sized or larger bass river in late October: a fly fisher is a rare sight.

Spin fishers, by contrast, know that late autumn fishes well on the big rivers. Bass are still active and walleyes, pike, and muskies are on the prowl. In addition, many of the larger streams and mid-sized rivers have transient populations of large, wild brown trout in the “transition zone” – that is to say the lower reaches of what normally passes for trout water (or where it is stocked) that transitions into a warm water fishery. These fish drop back downriver during the autumn, or migrate out into rivers from colder tributaries. To be sure, these trout are hard to find, cagy, often nocturnal even in colder periods, and are a specialized game. Nevertheless, they are part of the mix. Some very large browns fall to spin guys fishing tubes and swimming plugs for bass and walleyes during the colder months here in Pennsylvania every year.

autumn01Chances are, there are some big rivers near you that you might consider fly fishing in the coming weeks. Larger tailrace rivers such as the Delaware, Potomac, Lehigh, Youghiogheny, or Allegheny have trout in their upper reaches, but gradually these rivers transition to warm water species downriver and are associated with smallmouth bass, walleyes, and muskellunge. With colder temps in autumn, large trout will sometimes migrate downriver into these areas associated with warm water fishes.

Larger trout streams or “creeks” such as the Little Juniata, Frankstown Branch, Raystown Branch, Swatara, Mahoning, Clarion, Schuylkill, Tionesta, Shermans, Conodoguinet, Penns, Pine, Shenango, and other similar streams all are popular for both bass and trout. Moreover, about half of these creeks have muskies or tiger muskies. Smaller waterways such as these are prime spots to target bass, trout, and even muskies in late autumn. Even the West Branch Susquehanna is coming to be associated with stocked trout in its upper reaches these days in addition to its much-improved (now superb) warm water fishery downstream.

On waters such as these during the late autumn colder temps and shortening days put big river smallmouth bass in an aggressive mood. Big browns, and muskies are on the prowl as well and they’re not looking for a size 18 dry fly, they want a meal! Chubs, fallfish, shad, suckers, big sculpins, madtoms, and shiners are on the menu and these baitfishes have had a season to grow and are large, typically several inches in length and often much larger. This is the time of year to throw big streamers with at least a six-weight rod. Oftentimes, an eight- weight is better. A floating line works fine although if you’re working deeper rivers with current, a sinking line will get you in the strike zone.

autumn03Any large streamer can work, but I like articulated doubles using soft materials and deer hair. Clip the hair in a large spun head that pushes water. Deer hair can make a fly more buoyant and wind resistant, but such sparse, spun deer heads also produce a fly that has a nice side to side, erratic swimming pattern when stripped and stopped. This side to side swimming pattern is deadly. Generally, for this game I like flies in the four to seven-inch range or larger if you’re hoping to target toothy critters. Twenty-inch brown trout, or smallies in the mid-teens, are fish that can easily inhale and swallow six-inch prey species. I like double hook flies since trout and muskies often seem to seize the fly mid body and often need a trail hook for solid hook-ups. Bass, by contrast, only need a single hook at the front of the fly for good hook up ratio as bass are head hunters. Colors are a matter of preference, but the old wisdom about “dark day, dark fly” holds true in my opinion. Black and chartreuse is tough to beat in stained water.

A major challenge to this season is leaves and weed break-up. In late September, many rivers see a break-up of grass beds and this results in a lot of junk in the water column. By early October, much of the weed break-up is done, but leaves start to foul the water column by mid-month. By late October, leaves can make fishing nearly impossible in some places, especially on windy days. To contend with this, you will want a fly tied weedless so as to pull through the leaves. The flies depicted here are examples of typical streamers I’d reach for on autumn rivers. The key is a decent weed guard design. I prefer mono loops tied in at the hook eye, as can be seen. For larger patterns such as these, fifty pound mono works best. I generally put a weed guard only at the lead hook and not the trail hook. You’ll still catch some leaves, but weed guards will at least allow you to fish fairly effectively where conventional flies would immediately foul. Experiment and find a design that works for you – just keep the fly at least four inches long. Bigger is better.

October and November are great months for fly fishermen in Pennsylvania. Target the transition zone on larger creeks and rivers and you will have a genuine shot at multi-species if you throw big streamers. To be sure, smallmouth bass will be your most likely catch, but large brown trout and muskellunge are out there too. Just the other day, I was wading a favorite pool on a mid-sized creek and could see a brown trout, a three-foot-long muskie, and several smallies in the mid-teens. . . all within casting range. Catching all three species in a day would be uncommon in my experience, but the possibility exists if you’re at the right time and place. So, tie up some big weedless streamers and get out on a big creek or river this fall. The trout guys will be nowhere in sight and many of the summer bass fishing regulars are sitting in a tree stand. You’ll probably see few anglers. Double haul that big streamer out, strip it back through the leaves, and hold on when you see that big swirl or feel that pull. You may even have to fight the fish to surface before you’ll even know what chomped your fly. A motivating experience during a great time of year!
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 10/06/2016 (3195 reads)
Fly of the Month: Olive Woolly Bugger
by Tightline Productions

Tightline Productions has done a real nice video giving a step by step for Olive Woolly Bugger. This is one of my favorite flies to use almost year round. In the spring when there is no hatch or in the summer going for bass, I just love tossing this woolly bugger for some action. Enjoy.

Olive Woolly Bugger from Tightline Productions on Vimeo.

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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 09/21/2016 (2141 reads)
Fall fly fishing in Pennsylvania offers anglers an awesome opportunity to enjoy cool, colorful days on some spectacular streams. Anglers will appreciate the solitude of fall fishing while others are busy with different fall activities. There are plenty of streams across the state with trout and hatches to keep you busy on familiar waters and even going after some streams you’ve been thinking about.

Fall Fly Fishing

Just like in the spring, you’re looking for trout and good water. There are plenty of streams that have naturally reproducing trout as well as stocked waters by the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC). However, the PFBC only provides very limited stocking on select streams during the fall, which starts at the end of September through the beginning of October.

As the weather begins to change, so does the entomology or insect life in the stream. Activity will differ from region to region, stream size, summer water temperatures, and geology. The fall provides a more limited selection of insects, and often, anglers enjoy bringing a more modest selection of flies and imitations. Some of the more popular collections include Slate Drakes, BWOs, Caddis, terrestrials and egg patterns. Typical nymphs and streamers are always part of the mix.

Where to Fly Fish?

Stocked streams and Special Regulation Projects
About 40 streams are stocked after the start of fall by the PFBC. The amount of trout is not close to the spring stockings, but offer increased angling opportunity to some of the more popular Special Regulation streams across the state like Tuplehocken Creek, Ridley Creek, Oil Creek, Neshannock Creek, Little Lehigh, Little Pine Creek, Bush Kill, Kettle Creek and Laurel Hill Creek, to name a few. The full list of fall stocked lakes and streams can be found here in a PDF. Some private clubs and Co-operative Nurseries also provide some stockings beside the PFBC, but these details are not publicly released.

Rainbow Trout
Something from the PFBC

Class A Trout Streams
Class A Wild Trout Streams are designated by the PFBC as: “Streams that support a population of wild (natural reproduction) trout of sufficient size and abundance to support a long-term and rewarding sport fishery. The Commission does not stock these stream sections.”

Wild Trout
Something a little wild

There are hundreds of these streams across the state. Some of the more popular streams are Penns Creek, Little Juniata and Spring Creek. There are hundreds of streams across the state in this category, and a full PDF listing can be found here. Not all Class A stream sections are on public land so always ask permission from land owners when approaching Class As or other wild trout streams.

The wild trout in these streams behave and act differently than their pellet raised brothers. You’ll find these trout having lived a season or two and are well adjusted to their environment. They have survived the heat of the summer, floods, predators and have seen hundreds of anglers casting all kinds fly’s past them. Anglers who know the waters, conditions, and entomology of the fall will be rewarded for their knowledge with some fun but challenging trout.

Wilderness Trout Streams
“Wilderness Trout Streams are a sub-group of wild trout streams; some Wilderness Trout Streams also have a Class A designation based on meeting a minimum biomass threshold. Under 58 Pa. Code §57.4, it is the Commission’s policy to manage wilderness trout streams where stream remoteness and populations of wild trout combine to offer sport-fishing opportunities for anglers in a wilderness setting.” – PFBC. Often these remote wild trout stream areas share use with Hunters so always carry some blaze orange with you to help you to be recognized by hunters.

Holtwood Brook Trout Stream

These streams offer anglers a unique experience of often remote and out of the way streams with wild trout. Hopefully, anglers who make their way to these streams are rewarded with native brook trout in some great settings. These are often small feeder streams and those no-name streams you roll past getting to bigger, more popular stocked waters. These streams should be treated with great respect due to their fragile and unique environments. However, these streams are not all in the remote mountains of the state, but can often be found just around the corner of your home if you search a little.

Anglers with a sense of adventure, stealth and respect can have a lot of fun with little gems scattered throughout the state. Generally, we ask that you not even post a stream report for these special streams to keep the traffic and adventure optimal.

For more detailed designations on all the wild trout waters from the PFBC, anglers will enjoy the PDF publication - Pennsylvania’s Wild Trout Streams.

Watch Out for the Redds
Reproduction plays an important part of the trout lifecycle during the fall months for both brook and brown trout. Brook trout, native to the Eastern US, usually spawn during late September through October. Brown trout typically spawn in October through late November. However, each stream is very different when this actually occurs.

During the spawn, the coloring on the trout will intensify, especially in the males. Females will create gravel beds called "reds" for the dropped eggs to be fertilized. It is very important avoid fishing these sections on streams when you see redds and be careful not to kick them up when wading. It is probably best even to leave trout overtop redds alone and give them a chance to protect the eggs.

Enjoy your fall fly fishing and add your stream report to the forum to share with others when you return.
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 09/18/2016 (1046 reads)
Some would consider this years presidential election a race to the basement. Me being one of them. For Hank Patterson fans they'll be happy to know that the basement has new tool at the workbench. Yes, Hank is officially running for president.

"Of all the bad choices our country has to offer... Hank Patterson is the best. More beer. More fishing. More freedumb. Snap It!" -Hank

[Warning not work friendly. I'd give it a PG-13 rating for swear words if that offends you.]

For those that really love Hank they can even get a T-shirt to show their support. Hank hope you're reading this as I would really like a shirt or very least to be the Ambassador to New Zealand for this endorsement if you win. It seems like this is how the candidates operate and would expect you to be the same. Please send me a email for the T-Shirt.



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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 08/31/2016 (1476 reads)
Everyone always enjoys the images that are shared on Paflyfish. This past winter we announced our Spring 2016 Fly Fishing Photo Contest. Contestants were asked to submit images from the region while out this past spring fly fishing. We received dozens of entries and pleased to finally announce our winners. (Sorry for the delay) Many wonderful pictures were entered from all over the state.

We’re happy to recognize the winners of Spring 2016 Fly Fishing Photo Contest.

[I am sorry about the first announcement and I have to update the winners based on the disqualification of a photo. A quick reminder this was free contest with no entry fees and intended to be a fun way of sharing our fly fishing adventure this past spring. The best effort was put in here with the time and resources available to run this contest. Paflyfish is a community of volunteers helping each other out. I always appreciate everyone who understands this and offers constructive support to the site, mods, members and me. Thank you and congratulations to the winners.]

1st Place – Brookie Release by Jay348

2nd Place - Fun at The Run by JG63

3rd Place – Muskie by slay12345

Prizes for the winners include: A two-night stay this fall at Harman Luxury Log Cabins, Allen Fly Fishing is offering one of their just recently announced Atlas Fly Reels and shirt from their Exterus line of apparel, or Orvis Plymouth Meeting Store is providing a fly fishing pack.

We will ask that each of the winners PM with their addresses so I can notify the sponsors. Jay348 will get the first pick of the prizes, then JG63 and followed by Slay12345. There is only one prize pick for each winner. We want to thank all the participants who entered the contest and to our moderators/judges for their voting.

Contest Sponsors

Allen Fly Fishing – Allen Fly Fishing began in 2007 as the dream of one man to take his manufacturing experience and contacts and apply them to products for people to enjoy: fly fishing reels and fly tying hooks. Today Allen Fly Fishing provides a range of rod, reels, lines, hooks, fly tying gear. They have expanded their Exterus line of products that includes: outerwear, shirts and other apparel.

Harman Luxury Log Cabins – Situated along the North Fork River in Cabins, West Virginia. Harman’s 1 ¾ miles of private access trophy trout stream provides anglers with the opportunity to fish for rainbow, brown trout, brook, tiger and golden trout.  The stream is managed for trophy trout. Over 20 cabins provide guests a choice of accommodations for anglers, families and groups.

Orvis Plymouth Meeting Store - Founded by Charles F. Orvis in Manchester, Vermont, in 1856, Orvis is America’s oldest mail-order outfitter and longest continually-operating fly-fishing business. The Plymouth Meeting Store offers a full range of fly fishing gear, tying products, apparel, seminars and much more.

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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 08/04/2016 (3430 reads)
DCNR, Fish & Boat Move to Protect Wild Trout Fishery in Sections of Penns Creek in Bald Eagle State Forest
HARRISBURG, Pa. (Aug. 4) - Moving to protect wild trout beset by high water temperatures and low stream levels, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR) and Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC) officials temporarily have posted two sections of Penns Creek to prevent fishing and disturbance of massed fish by passersby.

“The prolonged combination of little rainfall and steadily climbing water temperatures has left wild trout massing at two locations in Bald Eagle State Forest where mountain streams are supplying needed oxygen and cooler water,” said State Forester Dan Devlin. “The goal is to prevent additional stress by limiting angling pressure and the chances of others needlessly spooking them.”

Both located in Mifflin County, not far from the Union-Centre County line, the posted areas affording trout thermal protection are along Penns Creek at the mouths of the Panther Run and Swift Run tributaries. As temperatures soared and stream levels dropped, trout have increasingly sought out these tributaries’ cooler waters.

“In an effort to gain support and protect this valuable resource we sought cooperation from the Fish and Boat Commission, and its bureaus of law enforcement and fisheries responded rapidly,” Devlin said, “clearing the way for a joint effort that will limit disturbance to fish in these areas. This limited and temporary closure is based solely on the need to provide areas of thermal refuge.”

This is not the first time the premier trout stream, harboring a unique, wild trout fishery that draws anglers from around the world, has been taxed by severe weather conditions. In 1999, trout were forced to congregate by the hundreds in coldwater tributary mouths along Penns Creek, and reports of harassment surfaced.

The Mifflin County postings, to be enforced by DCNR Rangers and PFBC Waterways Conservation Officers, will remain in effect until Penns Creek water conditions improve -- and that may take some time. The state Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) early this week issued a drought-watch declaration for 34 Pennsylvania counties, including Mifflin, Union and Centre counties. All are reporting low stream flows, declining groundwater levels and below-normal precipitation. Rainfall deficits of as much as 6.0 inches have been noted over the past 90 days.

Forum Comments Here
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 07/22/2016 (2144 reads)
Well forget that new rod this year, just get a custom high-end SUV built for fly fishing anglers. I think one in green would match my waders.

Bentley Bentayga ?? Mulliner

From the press release:

Bentley has created the ultimate angling accessory; the new Bentayga Fly Fishing by Mulliner.

Hand-crafted by Bentley’s bespoke coachbuilding division, the Bentayga Fly Fishing by Mulliner is an exquisite installation which houses all the equipment required for a successful day on the river.

Four rods are stored in special tubes trimmed in Saddle leather with Linen cross-stitching and located on the underside of the parcel shelf. A pair of landing nets in matching leather bags are stored in a bespoke, carpet-trimmed hard pocket built into the side of the boot.

At the heart of the Bentayga Fly Fishing by Mulliner are three individual, Saddle-leather-trimmed units: a master tackle station; a refreshment case; and waterproof wader-stowage trunk.

The master tackle station and refreshment case sit on a sliding tray that allows for easy access. Inside the master tackle unit is a special Burr Walnut veneered drawer containing a fly-tying vice and tools, as well as a selection of cotton, hooks and feathers. Beneath this are four machined-from-solid aluminium reel cases trimmed in Saddle leather with a Linen cross-stitching. The interior of the refreshment case is trimmed in Linen leather, and contains up to three metal flasks and a set of Mulliner fine-china tableware, as well as a separate food storage compartment. With a quilted leather finish on top, it can also be removed entirely and used as additional seating.

Waders and boots are conveniently stowed in a hand-crafted and Saddle-leather-wrapped wood trunk, lined with hard-wearing neoprene material to keep the items in a waterproof environment after use.

Of course, all three units can be removed from the Bentayga’s boot whenever maximum luggage space is required.

Waterproof boot-floor and rear-sill-protection covers are discreetly integrated into the rear of the Bentayga Fly Fishing by Mulliner, as is an electronic dehumidifier unit to ensure the area remains fresh and dry.

Bentley Bentayga ?? Mulliner

For the first time with Bentayga, Mulliner ‘Welcome Lights’ are also featured. These are built into the underside of the doors and project the Bentley and Mulliner logos on to the ground when the doors are opened. In addition as a bespoke option, any personal logo or graphic can be individually specified on a customer’s Bentayga order.

Geoff Dowding, Director of Mulliner, said: “The Bentayga Fly Fishing car showcases the breadth and level of detail a customer can expect from Mulliner. This is an individual bespoke solution and our skilled craftspeople can design elegant and exquisitely executed bespoke solutions to complement any customer lifestyle or hobby. Fly fishing is a sport that requires a variety of equipment and clothing, so it was essential to package the rods, reels, waders, boots and fly-tying station into the car in a luxurious, accessible and elegant way – and the end result is truly extraordinary.”

If you have to ask...well you know the answer.

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Published by David Weaver [Fishidiot] on 07/10/2016 (8682 reads)
Dave Weaver
Photographs and artwork courtesy of author

Potomac Fly Fishing

Harper’s Ferry is a quiet place where the gentle hiss of river current is the only consistent sound, especially at night. It was quiet a century and a half ago on the night of October 16th, 1859 as less than two dozen men, led by the messianic abolitionist from Kansas, John Brown, crossed the Potomac and slipped into the town streets to initiate what Brown believed would be the end of slavery in America. A staunch Calvinist who believed that he was on a mission from God to end slavery, Brown intended to bring to life his favorite passage from the Bible: “Without the shedding of blood, there is no remission of sins.” The sin of slavery would be paid for with Brown’s own blood if need be.

Thomas Jefferson said that the view from Harper’s Ferry Virginia (now West Virginia) where the Potomac and Shenandoah Rivers join was so “stupendous” as to be worth a trip across the Atlantic just to see its beauty. Thirty three years after our third President’s death, this little town saw played out what was arguably the seminal event leading to the Civil War – a drama seen through the lens of terrorism or martyrdom. Today, the bass fishing is fabulous in and around this tiny town so woven into the fabric of our nation’s past. For those fishermen with a historical bent, it’s easy to miss the strikes of hard hitting smallmouths due to the irresistible temptation to gaze at nearby Maryland Heights where Stonewall Jackson’s guns blasted the town into submission in 1862 (and forcing the largest surrender of Union forces in the Civil War); or the stately stone Harper house; or the old railroad bridge; or the fire engine house where Brown and his holdouts took cover; or any of a host of intriguing sites. A fisherman in the river is surrounded by bass under the surface and three states on the shorelines. So much to see, catch, and think about…so little time.

rusty spinnerAlthough largely a National Park today, Harper’s Ferry was an industrial town conceived by George Washington as a serendipitously located government factory village where converging waterways, upstream from the new capital, would drive the production of armaments for the incipient military of a fledgling nation. Jefferson’s protégé, Captain Meriwether Lewis, was provisioned for his Corp of Discovery here. By the mid Nineteenth Century the country had become consumed by the controversy over the expansion of slavery and Brown, a man who by all accounts had failed at every endeavor he’d undertaken, had pledged his life to the struggle against the South’s “peculiar institution” and set his sights on Harper’s Ferry.

John Brown was completely committed. Some thought him mad. After cutting his teeth in Bleeding Kansas where he committed several heinous murders of defenseless pro slavery men, Brown concocted a plan to move his personal war against slavery east and seize Harper’s Ferry and its weapons. He believed when news of his capture of the town spread that slaves to the south would hear the news and, undoubtedly with the help of divine providence, rise up against their masters and march in unison to join Brown, from whom they would receive the captured weapons. Thus armed, a slave revolt would snowball across the land and the institution of slavery would fall. When Brown proposed his plan to some prominent abolitionists in the North he was mostly rebuffed. Frederick Douglas thought his plan impossible and refused to participate. Nevertheless, Brown did get some backing by some who shared the growing frustration of many abolitionists who had come to feel that speechifying, rhetoric, and the publishing of treatises were toothless against the nation’s great sin.

rusty spinnerAfter several months of planning on a farm in Maryland, Brown was ready to strike. When he and his band crept into town that night they had, nevertheless, taken no rations with them nor did Brown seem to have any systematic operational plan to hold the town, spread the news, and develop the situation. It was a mess from the start. The raiders sent out parties in the night to detain local citizens and confiscate weapons and Harper’s Ferry remained fairly quiet through the night, but word soon began to spread and by daybreak local citizens, having discovered something awry, began a steady resistance and gunfire grew louder. The blood of locals, some innocent bystanders, and Brown’s followers began to flow in the streets. Brown seemed not to know what to do next and by morning had lost the initiative to a growing force of local militiamen and armed citizens. The local militiamen, enraged at the “vile abolitionists” and eager to avenge the deaths of townspeople, mutilated the bodies of some of Brown’s followers or cast them into the river. Panic and rumors soon spread across Virginia that an army of abolitionists were swarming down from the north and that a slave revolt was brewing. Many Southerners thought the raid a distraction, just the beginning of a larger assault. The South’s Great Nightmare seemed to be coming to life.

Although groundless, the rumors fueled a massive reaction with ripple effects felt in Washington by afternoon. On temporary duty in the Capital was Colonel Robert E. Lee and a reaction force of several dozen Marines and a couple field guns were hurriedly marshaled, placed under his command, and sent by train to Harper’s Ferry to put down what Lee called the “insurgents” and their “gross outrage against law and order.” Following this force were hundreds of militiamen and local vigilantes galvanized by the sensationalized headlines and rumors.

rusty spinnerBy the time Lee and his force reached the town in the pre-dawn hours of the 18th, much of the fighting had died down and Brown and his remaining fighters and their hostages had holed up in a fire engine house from which they had managed to keep up enough gunfire to hold the townspeople and militiamen at bay. The situation stalemated, a tense calm had settled over the town.

Lee had a lieutenant named J.E.B. Stuart, under a flag of truce, approach the engine house and offer terms. Brown refused and spent the rest of the night barricading the doors and preparing his defense. He had only a couple followers left unscathed. The local African Americans who he’d coerced into his force showed little enthusiasm for the fight. At dawn, Stuart returned to the engine house, received Brown’s final refusal to surrender, and the Marines promptly began their assault, battering the doors with hammers and eventually breaking through using a ladder as a ram. The troops quickly overwhelmed the defenders, killing one of Brown’s sons in the fight. Brown himself was struck down, wounded by a sword blow from Lieutenant Green who had led the assault into the engine house. Unapologetic and defiant, Brown was hauled off to face trail for insurrection and what he undoubtedly knew was an inevitable date with the gallows.

Part 2 of 2
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 05/24/2016 (8115 reads)
green drake I was looking through my photographs from last year and found a Green Drake snapshot, which is one of my favorites. Green Drakes (Ephemera guttulata) are one of my favorite flies to observe, too.

I say observe as I usually find myself on Penns Creek fishing while a huge Green Drake hatch is coming off and I am doing anything, but catching a lot of trout. The mixed hatches that occur during this time of year are exciting and frustrating as many angler's would agree.

So this year I am going to stop practicing the fine art of talking to myself during the hatch and I might even throw on a sulphur or a should I dare say a emerger on during the madness?

The Green Drakes can starting showing up around May 20th and are complimented by the Coffin Fly spinners which provide equal splendor during this time of year. So sit back and get ready to enjoy the show.

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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 05/13/2016 (1360 reads)
Friday, May 20th is the start annual gathering for the Paflyfish Spring Jamboree Weekend. This our annual meet-up for members of the site get together to fly fish, tie flies, camp and share a few stories. We have a lot of fun fishing over some of Pennsylvania's finest streams including the Little J, Penns Creek, Spring Creek, Fishing Creek and plenty more in the region.


The pavilion is rented by Paflyfish and is used as a meeting point during the weekend. Plenty of impromptu conversations, fly tying and meet-ups take place at the pavilion. The idea of the weekend it provide a setting for a casual weekend fly fishing in a great region of Pennsylvania . As with every year we will be meeting up in the evenings at the pavilion to catch up. Friday and Saturday mornings we meet for coffee and plan the day. Often plenty of opportunities for some fly tying and casting lessons being shared.


Friday night we a very fortunate to have Dave Rothrock lead a presentation on Fly Fishing Central Pennsylvania Streams. Dave is an expert angler, outstanding guide and certified casting instructor in the region. His fly fishing experience and incredible knowledge will make for a great presentation on Friday night and should not be missed. Saturday morning Dave will also be leading anglers with a Saturday morning casting clinic with the help of Derek "TimRobison" and Tom Ciannilli "Afishinado", both professionals in the fly fishing industry. I want to thank all three gentleman in their help and support of the weekend.

Green Drake

Friday – May 20th
• Arrival of members to the 7 Mountains Campground
• Fishing the local streams
• ~10:pm Welcome by Dave Kile
Presentation by Dave Rothrock "Old Lefty"– Central PA fishing guide, fly tyer and FFF casting instructor
Discussion on Fishing the Central PA streams – locations, methods, and hatches.

Saturday – May 21st
• 7:00 am Coffee at the pavilion
• 9am -11am Casting Clinic taught by Dave Rothrock "OldLefty"– FFF casting instructor and assisted by Derek "TimRobison" and Tom Ciannilli "Afishinado"
• Fishing the local streams
• ~10pm Dave Kile - PAFF Raffle to benefit Rivers Conservation & Fly Fishing Youth Camp (Donations accepted)
Featuring Artwork by Dave Weaver "Fishidiot"

Sunday - May 22nd
• 7:00 am Coffee at the pavilion
• 9am - Open fly tying demonstrations to members tying their favorite patterns. Bring your vise and materials!


In addition to the expected fly fishing opportunities; authors, fly shop owners, and other experts are usually in attendance and provide a lot of great knowledge throughout the weekend. Follow the latest details in the forum here.


Please contact Sevens Mountain Campground directly if you would like to stay there that weekend. They have a limited number of cabins and campsites. I encourage you to make your reservations now.

Sevens Mountain Campground
101 Seven Mountains
Campground Rd.
Spring Mills, PA 16875
(814) 364-1910
(888) 468-2556
Call between 8:30-4:30 M-F
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