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The Sulphurs are here!

Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 2013/3/13 (944 reads)


I met Bill Kosmer a few years ago on a trip to the Fly Fishing Show in Somerset. I really enjoyed his knowledge and observations with the many conservations issue that our waterways face in the region. His photography also caught my eye. When I heard about Bill heading on a trip to Chile I was sure he would be coming back with some good stories and some fantastic images as well.

With his DSLR cameras and two Contour video cameras he and his friend, Herb Baker, captured their trip into South America. I really enjoy seeing fly fishing from around the world and lucky when we can get a first person point of view from someone in our region share their story. Give yourself a little time to kick back and enjoy Bill's journey fly fishing in Chile from February 2013.

About Bill -
Bill’s passion for fly fishing and photography was set in motion at an early age by his father. He spent most of his childhood days fishing the mountain freestone streams of his home waters of North Central Pennsylvania. Since those early days, the pursuit of wild trout has become a lifestyle for Bill. Over the last 20 years, camera and fly rod in hand, he has traveled extensively to fuel his passion for pursuing wild trout in remote locations from southern Chile to Montana to the backwoods of PA. His photos and writings have also appeared in the Drake and several newsletters and catalogs. He has given numerous presentations on his adventures and is an active member with the Doc Fritchey Chapter of Trout Unlimited in Harrisburg, PA, giving back to the resources he values so much. Bill is also an accomplished fly-tier and licensed guide. You can follow Bill further on his blog Trout Tails.
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 2013/3/8 (1376 reads)


When I grow up I want to be Hank Patterson. It's Friday afternoon and we all need a little fun to start the weekend! Good news Hank will be at the Simms Ice Out too. http://youtu.be/llba13w0Xb8
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 2013/3/4 (3297 reads)
photo

We have some fantastic anglers on this site and many who have shared some wonderful images from their fly fishing experiences. It doesn't matter if photography is your passion, your hobby, or just an occasional pastime, we invite you to participate in the Paflyfish photo contest, recognizing the beauty and character of fly fishing in the Pennsylvania fly fishing region. I thought it would be fun to capture those images this winter.

Winning photos will be displayed on the Paflyfish website and we have prizes from our sponsor Allen Fly Fishing. Allen Fly Fishing is offer prizes for 1st, 2nd and 3rd place. Details of those prizes will be shared shortly, but you can be sure it will involve fly rods and reels!

Both amateur and professional photographers are welcome to participate. Photos must be submitted in digital format; see contest rules for details.

Each participant may submit one photograph in total. All images must be digitally uploaded. You can upload your images at the photo section. Select the “2013 Winter Photo Contest” Category when submitting your photograph.

Start Date: December 21, 2012 at 12:00 AM, EST End Date: March 19, 2013 at 12:00 PM EST. We’re not responsible for errors that may terminate the contest early so enter soon.

Sorry for the length and this is intended to be fun, but most all questions can be answered by reading the rules and directions below. Please read!

No payment necessary to enter or win

Photo Eligibility
To enter, you must be at least 18 years of age and a U.S. citizen. PaFlyFish.com employees, moderators and their immediate family members are not eligible. All photos must be taken in Pennsylvania region, which includes: New York, New Jersey, Maryland and Ohio during the timeframe of the contest. The photo subject must be relevant to fly fishing in the region.

How to Enter
Digital photos may be submitted online only. You must register on the PalyFish.com website. Previously uploaded photographs can be resubmitted. You can upload your images in the photo section. Select the “2013 Winter Photo Contest” Category when submitting your photograph. Entries must be received by the deadline (see above). Digital images will not be returned. No mail or postal entries accepted.

Image Modifications:
Minor digital enhancement is permitted, but images that have been significantly modified or appear unnatural will be disqualified.
Not Permitted:
* No borders or frames may be added to images.
* No watermarks, signatures, or copyright notices may be added to images. All winning images will be displayed with the photographer's name.

Photo Formats
Entries must be digital JPEG images and images should be 1024 pixels on the longest side at 72PPI. Please read the specific guidelines for submitting prints and digital images. Winning entries may be requested to provide larger available images.

Judging
Entries will be judged on the basis of creativity, photographic quality, and effectiveness in conveying the beauty and/or unique character of Pennsylvania Winter Fly Fishing.

Winners
Judges will select a first, second and third place winning photos. Winners will be announced on the website and notified approximately 1-2 weeks after the contest deadline by website private messaging and email using the information provided in your PaFlyFish website registration. Winning photographs, along with the photographer's name, email address (optional) and information about the photo, will be displayed on the PaFlyFish.com website.

Photographer/Copyright
Entries must be submitted by the original photographer. Do not submit a photo taken by someone other than yourself. You must be the sole owner of the copyright of any image submitted. Your submission of the photo and entry form is your guarantee that you are the author and copyright holder of the photo.

Photo Subject Restrictions
We cannot accept photos that contain any nudity and follow site guidelines. PaFlyFish.com retains sole discretion as to what constitutes inappropriate content. Winners will be selected based on several criteria including, originality, theme, technical & artistic details, story, and visual impact. Notified winning photos containing recognizable people must be able to provide a signed model release to be announced as a winner.

Ownership/Use Rights
Photographers retain the copyright to their photographs. By entering the contest, photographers agree to have their submitted photograph displayed on the PaFlyFish.com website without any fee or other form of compensation, and agree that PaFlyFish.com may display winning photos in a "past winners" photo gallery, and may make and retain copies of the photograph for archival purposes. Posted photos will be subject to the PaFlyFish.com website photo use policy. Photos will be credited to the photographer named in the entry form. Entries (including non-winning entries) may be selected for display or use in PaFlyFish.com web pages. Your entry to the contest constitutes your agreement to allow your photographs — and your name, city and state of residence — to be published as selected award winners in all materials related to the contest and to be published or used on websites owned or operated by Kile Media Group and PaFlyFish.com; and used for promotions of the website including, but not limited to, exhibitions, a photo calendar, a compilation book or electronic collection of photographs, online photo features, and web pages providing information, updates, rules and photography and fly fishing tips. Entrants retain Copyright ownership and all other rights to future use of their photographs. PaFlyFish.com shall have the right to verify, in their sole judgment, winner eligibility.
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 2013/2/25 (1118 reads)
Paflyfish


The Paflyfish Moderators decided to take a day off from the forum and left the site in the good hands of Jack. We made our way to south central Pennsylvania to one of the more popular limestone streams.

Paflyfish


Actually a reasonable winter day with temps in the upper 30's, water temps in the low 50's and a mix of sun and clouds. We had hoped for some BWO's, but got snow flurries by the end of the day instead.

Paflyfish

The fishing was pretty good as Dave landed real nice 20" rainbow early on. Tom proceeded to quietly catch fish for the rest of the day. Maurice and I tried our best to keep up.

Paflyfish

Dave took a quick stab with his net into the elodea and showed just how limestone streams sustain a rich abundant aquatic life through out the year with cress bugs, sculpin and shrimp.

Always great to catch up with them on the stream. The site is very fortunate to have great guys like Maurice, Dave and Tom helping support site in so many ways. Their dedication to the site and fly fishing really make a difference here at Paflyfish.

When ever we get together and start catching up I am quickly reminded just what a wealth of fly fishing knowledge these guys offer to the site. I always learn so much when I hang out with them. Thanks so much for your help!

Some more photographs on Facebook.

Sorry Jack could not join us and hope he can make it with us next time.
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 2013/2/20 (1159 reads)

I had been looking for a wader and boot bag for quite some time. For over twenty years I was using a 5 gallon plastic paint bucket as my boot storage of choice. I store my gear in the garage and after continually finding stinkbugs in my boots along with a few cracks in my beloved bucket, I figured it was time to get serious about a real bag.

Fishpond Pawnee Gear BagLast March I finally settled on the Fishpond Pawnee Gear Bag. It served the perfect combination of storing my boots on the bottom and waders in a separate top compartment. There is an extra gear compartment to stash plenty of other fly fishing boxes and other gear.

The bag is well built out of nylon with sturdy large zippers to access the different storage areas. The bottom boot compartment also holds a fold-out padded changing mat. The base storage area for the boots is nicely ventilated all he way around.

I have used the bag for almost a year now and very pleased with the value build quality. The large top wide mouth open provides easy access to stash my waders quickly and easily. A shoulder strap makes it easy to haul around as I usually bring enough gear when I fish to make Lewis and Clark jealous.

I like the size and large anvil style opening. I paid list price at $139.00 which may put off some, but it is well built and see it lasting a long time and a solid investment. All and all a good purchase and one I would suggest
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 2013/2/11 (1679 reads)
by Brian McGeehan at Montana Angler Fly Fishing


Montana Angler Fly FishingOur trip to Argentina in 2013 proved to be a diverse adventure that spanned both the southern and northern areas of the country. After flying into Buenos Aires we spent a day in this beautiful European style city enjoying the sites and of course some incredible Argentine steaks. The first leg of the trip was an overnight fly fishing trip on the Chubut River in the center of Patagonia. The second leg of the trip was to the Ibera marsh ecosystem in the Corrientes province in the extreme north of the country in a quest to catch the unique golden dorado.

Golden Dorado
Golden Dorado are native to South America in a relatively small geographic region that includes Northern Argentina, Uruguay, Southern Brazil and some small pockets in Bolivia. Most of the fisheries are located in the Paraná River and its tributaries. There are also a few pockets of the species in Bolivia at the headwaters of the Amazon basin. Dorado are river fish and have a similar profile as that of a salmon including an adipose fin. Just like salmonids they prefer to current features when selecting feeding lies. Golden dorado are fierce piscivores and aggressively take large streamers.. They are fierce fighters and nearly always jump when hooked. Golden Dorado have not been transplanted out of their native range and they have only come onto the radar of international anglers in the last 10-15 years. Although some of the largest dorado are caught in the larger Paraná River many fly anglers choose to target the fish in the relatively few locations where clear waters prevail. Catching a large, strong and aggressive dorado in a river that resembles a trout stream is truly a rush. Imagine fishing for small tarpon on the Madison! The primary locations that support guided golden dorado fishing are the new Tsimane Lodge in Bolivia, the Salta region of Argentina and the Ibera Marsh at the headwaters of the Corrientes River. Most of the fishing at Tsimane and Salta is wade fishing on smaller clear rivers. There is also a large river, the Rio Juramento, near Salta that is floated in rafts for trophy dorado. On our recent trip south we split our trip between Patagonia and Northern Argentina where we targeted the Ibera Marsh which offers a unique clear water fishery accessed by Bahamas style flats boats.

Pira Lodge
Pira lodge is located in the Corrientes province of Argentina which is sandwiched between Brazil and Paraguay. The province is known for its colorful people and traditional music. We took a first class overnight sleeper bus which was surprisingly comfortable with large leather chairs that lay flat into beds along with bar service and meals. After sleeping on the bus all night we arrived refreshed in Mercedes and were greeted by the lodges transfer driver. Pira is located on the edge of the vast Ibera marsh system and the drive is about an hour an half from Mercedes across rutted dirt roads. The lodge itself is spectacular with an array of insects, huge toads and countless colorful birds making a never ending raucous chorus each evening. After settling in we met with Noel and the guides. Noel was the head guide for over 13 years at Pira and then went on to start Tisamane Lodge in Bolivia and is one of the most respected dorado anglers in the world. Unfortunately the news on the fishing front wasn't good. All of Argentina had just endured an unusual three week stretch of very wet and cold weather. Dorado are a warm water fish and become lethargic in colder waters and just like trout they don't love rising flows. Despite the disappointing news we were determined to give it our all.

Montana Angler Fly FishingPira Day 1
With the unexpected conditions and higher flows, Noel and the guides felt our best shot at fish was to go down deep in the main Corrientes river channel. Pira is known for its floating line fishing and aggressive surface takes but with the cooler water it was unlikely that the dorado would be very active and certainly not on the surface. At the end of the first day we hit pay dirt and Anthony and I each hooked and landed two nice 5-7lb dorado in the waning hours of the evening before heading back to the lodge. The fish are absolutely amazing and hit like a sledgehammer. The fight is just as impressive as these incredibly strong, trout shaped fish leap over and over and take of on blistering runs. When the dorado are landed their magnificent gold flanks and orange and black tail cap the experience.

Pira Day 2
The fishing at Pira is broken into morning and evening sessions. Each day we headed out in flats boats through a labyrinth of small channels. The marsh ecosystem is spectacular with over 350 species of native birds of all shapes, colors and sizes. The birdlife was absolutely spectacular and I can't say I have ever been to an equal location in this regard. In addition to the birdlife we regularly saw large crocodile like caymen and huge rodents called capybara. Day two produced some very tough fishing and although we all had a few hits and follows no dorado came to the boat. Noel came along on day two and he and Anthony scouted some of the smaller tributary "creeks". These are small channels through the marsh with current just like a spring creek and very clear waters. While scanning from the boat they successfully located a lot of large dorado in the system which lifted our spirits to at least know the fish were there. One of the challenges of the high water in the marsh is the fish are spread out and often relocate so finding the fish was a welcome discovery.

Pira Day 3
The morning fishing continued to be frustrating with a lack of success. With each hour of futile casting our team began to lose hope in the prospects of hooking the golden fish. Occasionally our hope would be lifted by a follow or take. I lucked into a hefty 7 pounder at the end of the morning and that was the only action to report. In the evening session I was solo with Noel and we decided to try some of the smaller creeks where they had seen some fish the day before with a floating line. We finally started to see the marsh begin to wake up in terms of fish activity and spotted a few dorado rolling from time to time. Noel explained under normal conditions dorado are frequently rolling and attacking bait fish in explosive disturbances than are easy to spot. This seemed to be a good sign and sure enough the action followed. By the end of the night I had hooked into 5 dorado and landed two along with several large piranha and an interesting fish called a san antonio. This still wasn't on par with the regular catch rates which average 4-10 dorado per person per day but it was great to get a taste of what the fishing can be like. The takes on the floating line were a huge rush and it was incredible to see the dorado in the clear water producing a wake as they attacked the fly in a huge boil. Unfortunately the other boat didn't find similar success on the larger river down current.

Montana Angler Fly FishingPira Day 4
The rains that started the evening before continued into the night and eventually turned into sustained downpours. The amount of rain that fell was unprecedented and a true spectacle of nature. The swimming pool that was 18" from the top the day before was overflowing in the morning. The marsh grew before our eyes and huge lakes formed in all directions around the lodge. We gave up all hope of fishing in the torrent and focused our attention on getting out across the dirt roads early enough to catch our sleeper bus. Our amazing hostess Marcela decided to have the shuttle drive arrive 5 hours early to play it safe. When he was an hour late she loaded us up in her own truck and we started heading out hoping to meet him on the road out. The roads were terrible and just a few minutes from the lodge we were driving across flooded areas. Marcela crept along and stayed ruts to avoid sliding off the slippery clay road. After 30 minutes of progress our hearts sank as we came around a bend and saw the road completely under water as far as the eye could see with a Toyota Hi-lux truck nearly underwater in the ditch. It looked like our stay at the lodge would be extended for several more days. There were some local gauchos around and Marcela went out to talk with them. It turned out that her husband was the one that lost the truck in the flood but he was the manager of several estancias in the area and had guessed we were coming. Our transfer driving was waiting on the other side of the flooded road and the gauchos let Marcela know that they could ferry us across. The next thing we knew we were horseback and praying these horseman were confident in their assessment of the waters. The current was swift across the road and the level came up to the horses bellies. We had to ride at a bit of an angle so the horses could ferry into the current. After the longest 500 yard horse ride of my life we made it safely to the other side where our drive awaited. The gauchos crossed the flood again to retrieve our luggage via horseback and we were off again. Just when we thought we were out of the woods we encountered another flooded section (the water had kept rising since the drive had come from town). It wasn't as bad as the other stretch but still very intimidating. We all held our breath as the truck headed into the flood with water coming in through the doors. It was a very quiet cab until we finally made it across the last obstacle safely. Nearly five hours later we finally made it to the bus station with only minutes to spare!

Brian McGeehan is a native Pennsylvanian and owner of Montana Angler Fly Fishing (http://www.montanaangler.com) based in Bozeman, MT. Brian is also an avid international angler and leads annual trips to Argentina, Chile and the Bahamas.
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 2013/1/28 (1770 reads)


I am always a big fan of the The Fly Fishing Shows that Chuck Furimsky has put together over the past 21 years. For me it is a great chance to meet up with friends, see new gear, watch some of the seminars and shake off a little of that cabin fever that sets in this time of year. This years show delivered on all fronts.

As usual I started off on Friday rolling thru the exhibit area before the bigger crowds showed up. I like to do some quick scouting and plan out where I want spend some time later on Friday and into Saturday. Always glad to meet up with my long time friend Keith Torok as I get started. He also always comes prepared with a really good game plan for the seminars that I like to follow!

We then quickly jumped off and caught Ozzie Ozefovich's The Underwater World of Trout presentation. This was really educational and if you have not had a chance to hear Ozzie before take the time to catch up on one of his DVD's. Ozzie demonstrated through the use of cameras and special lenses placed into streams just what trout see underwater. A lot of on supporting observations and research, but one of the biggest tips from his presentation is don't wear anything lightly colored including kaki shirts and hats. Fly fishing anglers need to dress more to the surrounding meaning wear greens, browns and camouflage yourself. I look forward to following on this topic for a whole separate post.

We then caught up with my friend George Daniel for his seminar - 2013 Trout Lessons. George always provides an engaging presentation and a shared a lot of great new tips from his travels over the year. What makes George's presentations so good is that he is a not only a masterful angler, but still is an acknowledged student and takes delight in sharing new ideas. Fun hearing him speak about some of his recent exploits on the White River. Small overtures during his presentation about the sorted crew he was hanging with. Later found out he was traveling with likes from The Feathered Hook for the week. That will certainly make you want to grow a beard and find new colorful language. George is looking forward to working on his next book project on that will take on streamer fishing.

I made may way over to the professional fly tiers including Dave "Wetfly01" Allbaugh, Mike "firandfeather" Heck, Gaeron "Gaeronf" Friedrichs, Mike Schmidt and Anthony Giaquinto (Thanks for the fly Anthony) who were there for the weekend along with dozens of other tiers.

Plenty of members from the site there over the weekend including: Aducker, Lestrout, Pcray1234, Gaeronf, Old Lefty, Sbecker, Vcregular, Wetfly01 and host of people I missed like dubthethorax. I had a good conversation with Justin Pittman, President of Cumberland Valley Chapter Trout Unlimited, in regards to upcoming educational programs and 2013 State Fly Tying Championship, which has been impacted by the cancelled Eastern Sports & Outdoor Show.

Always pleased to see and spend some time with Justin and Evan at the Allen Fly Fishing booth. They were very busy and glad to hear about many Paflyfish members stopping by say hi and even better purchasing reels while I was even standing there. In the booth I got a chance to meet photographer, Rob Yaskovic and tattoo artist, Eric Hornung who both focus their own artistry with fly fishing. Glad that Justin made some room for those guys over the weekend in the booth.

The show was very well attended by vistors and vendors in the exhibit hall. There were many new booths from companies like Orvis and Cortland. Cortland brought in a one room cabin and caught my eye. Other traditional vendors like Rio recently updated some of the Trout LT series and the Rio fly lines over the past year. The newer Rio Gold line provides a better front biased weight to load rods at close range and improved casting control. Also caught up with Tom "Afish" Ciannilli, manager at the Plymouth Meeting Orvis Store. I liked the newer Safe Passage and Gale Force Packs as they provided a lot more size options and darker camouflage coloring on the water.

Great show and looking forward to following up with some specific blog posts covering some of the issues and ideas at the show. Next is the Lancaster Fly Fishing Show in March.





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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 2013/1/21 (3136 reads)
Winter Fly Fishing - what do I do?

This winter has started off pretty mild for most in the region and there are plenty of fly fishing options right now. I am sure with this post I will jinx it for everyone, but let's just go with it anyway. Usually after the last NFL conference game I hear those dreaded words, "Isn't it about time you start cleaning up the basement?" That's the time I buy a new fishing license and break out my map.

Winter Fly FishingWhere
No secrets, but there are plenty of streams across the region that are open year-round that are often stocked in the fall or have naturally reproducing trout. Some really good opportunities can be found in the limestone spring feed streams too. They generally hold good water temperatures and some of the more challenging fly fishing opportunities. Take a little time and do some research for something new there are plenty of places to explore here in the forums!


When
Any day works as compared to moving your old soccer trophies in the basement. No sense waiting for that late evening sulphur hatch because that ain't gonna happen. On mild winter days your best bet is late morning through mid-day. Trout are going to be the most active when they get a chance to warm up a little (whatever that means when the water is 47 degrees). Certainly it will not be at the crack of dawn so a little sun on the water often helps, but not required.

Flies
If you are lucky on a warm day you may find a BWO hatch or some stone flies coming off. This is rare and will only happen on the warmest of days. So most of your time you spend chucking some lead. Everybody has their favorites and truly it depends on the stream. My approach to each stream is a little different. I often start with some streamers or woolly buggers. For stocked streams I like san juan worms, bead head nymphs and dare I say the dreaded green weenie when I get desperate (after standing in cold water that happens sooner than I like). For limers I might try more natural looking and smaller nymphs like walt's worm, pheasant tail and zebra midges. Do some experimenting.

Staying Warm
So it is pretty simple and this has been told to you plenty of times - Layers, layers and layers: Wool socks, wool hat and fingleress gloves are a must. Use a lightweight wickable base layer that will keep you dry. Winter Fly FishingAvoid cotton layers as they retain moisture and keep you cold. Add warm mid layers and outer shell or jacket that will break the wind. Try your gear on before and make sure it works. I almost busted a gut this year after the the holiday fattening season trying to fit into my neoprenes. I don't know who the jerk was that bought them, but the damn things must have shrunk or something. Throw some extra layers in the car just in case. There is a huge difference in taking a winter walk for one hour in 45 degree weather and standing in a stream that is 45 degrees. For me it is all about keeping my feet warm. I try to move about and stand on the edge of the stream every 20 minutes.

If you find the fishing slow you can get some time in scouting for some new fishing locations or just go home and move boxes from one wall to the other?

PS - leave a note, bring a blanket, food, and water. The last thing I need on my conscious is that you read this post and went fishing, got your arm stuck in a boulder or worse yet trapped in the Rathskeller in State College and didn't come home safely. Finally, as we have learned in our history classes about the Donner Party, bring along a friend, it never hurts.







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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 2013/1/15 (1962 reads)
For those new to the sport, every year in the winter is the time for many of the outdoor sporting shows and fly fishing is now exception. Chuck Furimsky has been running The Fly Fishing Show across the country for many years. The Somerset, NJ and more recent Lancaster, PA shows are regional favorites in January and March.


Last Years Somerset, NJ Show


The Fly Fishing Show is one of my favorite events every winter, too. Certainly the opportunity to see all the gear, listening to some great speakers is awesome, but truly the best part of the show is meeting up with so many people I have known for years makes the trip special. You can't help but trip over members from Paflyfish while at the show.

Like many events there is a large exhibit area with everything fly fishing related that you can imagine: rods, reels, waders, boots, manufactures, fly shops, tying gear, trips and guides from all over the world.

Also in the exhibit hall is a section for celebrity fly tiers. Just an amazing array folks with vices out, fur and feathers flying and some incredible flies being tied.

There are host of authors and speakers to be found during the show. There are times to catchup with your favorite author during a book signing or catch them at a seminar. Favorites like Lefty Kreh, Joe Humphreys, George Daniel, Mike Heck, Ben Turpin, Eric Stroup, Dave Whitlock and plenty more.

If you looking for some new gear, wanting to improve your fly fishing skills or just anxious to see a lot of guys walk around with fleece jackets and ball caps this is the place and I wouldn't miss it.

There really is a lot going on at the shows. To check out more details here for the Somerset Show (Jan 25-27) and the Lancaster Show (Mar 2-3). You can buy tickets at the show.






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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 2013/1/2 (1325 reads)
With the new year there are new options for multi-year fishing licenses being offered by the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC). Traditionally the PFBC has only provided a annual fishing licenses.

Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission “Beginning December 1, we will start selling 3-year and 5-year fishing licenses for the first time in our history,” said PFBC Executive Director John Arway. “Customers want options when they buy products, and fishing is no different.”

A traditional 2013 annual licenses costs $22.70 plus $9.70 for the trout stamp for a total of $32.40. The three year license will run you $64.70 and a trout stamp is $25.70 for a total of $90.40. That is compared to $97.20 over three years of individual purchases for about a 7% savings when purchasing the three year combination. The five year license and trout stamp combined will run a resident $148.40 at a similar savings.

Senior resident and non-resident multiyear licenses are available as well again with similar savings. Multiyear Combo trout-salmon/Lake Erie permits are available too.

There is a lot of convenience and some small cost savings by purchasing a multiyear license. The real advantage is by avoiding any cost increases if they were to occur over the next several years.

Please go to the PFCB website here to learn more.
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