Register now on PaFlyFish.com! Login
HOME FORUM BLOG PHOTOS LINKS


Category Last published item
PaFlyFish.com  PaFlyFish.com
The Small Warm Water Stream Summer Game

Published by Dave Kile [davekile] on 04/29/2009 (1936 reads)
Author: Bob Bastian

No one really knows when fly fishing first began. It is believed that it existed long ago in ancient times. One of the earliest written references to fly fishing was made by Claudius Aelianus. In 200 AD he wrote of people that were fishing in a river with a hand made fly. He described how they attached red wool and feathers to a hook. The rods they used and the sting attached were each about six feet long. These people were the ancient Macedonians. Throughout history from Aelianus to the present people have been writing about fly fishing, and many thousands of others have been enjoying the sport.

The Princess of Soapwell, English, was an avid fly fisherman. Her name was Dame Juliana Berners and she was a master at her sport. At the time Columbus was searching for the New World, Dame Juliana was publishing an extensive treatise on the art of fly fishing. In her treatise she described the twelve styles of fly and included extensive instructions on how to tie them. She patterns were put into categories by the month that they were used most often.

She also described the rod that was used for fly fishing during that time. It measured about 18 feet long and was very flexible, The rods were made of several different types of wood which added to their flexibility. Their lines were short, by today's standards, and were made of hand braided horse hair. The general rule of the time was that the line should not be longer then the fishing rod. The line was tied to the tip of the pole.

Many fly fishermen of today have used her patterns for the fly. They say they are just as effective today as they were more than five hundred years ago. Several of the more popular patterns include the Black Gnat, the Wooly Worm, the Stonefly and the Whirling Dun.

In the mid 1600's Isaak Walton published his book "Compleat Angler." Throughout history from then on, Izaak Walton has been considered the patron saint on angling, and of fly fishing in particular. In truth, it was actually his friend, Charles Cotton, that had contributed the portion of the book that pertained to fly fishing. The flies and rods described in this book were very similar to those described by Dame Juliana. However, the lines described were slightly different. They were still made of horsehair but were about six feet longer then those of the 1400's. The main difference was that some of the lines were tapered. It is believed that this was the first time tapered lines were described in writing.

In the early 1800's, fishing line makers began mixing silk in with the horsehair. By the time of the Civil War the first all silk lines were made. They were coated with an oily coating which made them water resistant. Horsehair lines were almost never used after that. Occasionally they were found in England up to World War II.

The first nylon line was made in 1948 and from that point forward synthetic materials have been used by most people for fly fishing. In 1952, a technology was created that made an automatically tapered line withe extreme precision.

About the Author:

If you're interested in fly fishing, here's a resource you won't want to be without. Learn the art and craft of fly fishing, and catching the big ones that all anglers dream about! Visit this page for more information at http://www.palalu.com/flyfishing/

Article Source: ArticlesBase.com - The History of Fly Fishing

  Send article

Published by Dave Kile [davekile] on 04/10/2009 (1509 reads)
Where should I fish?
This certainly has been one of the more popular questions asked at PaFlyFish.com. Truthfully the answer is bigger than the question and one worth exploring. There are hundreds of fantastic streams for all types of anglers in Pennsylvania. A little homework will yield you your own personal hot spots.

PaFlyFish.com is chocked full of maps, tips, news, stories and conversations already at you fingertips. Pennsylvania is a sizable state so starting with the Pa Trout Streams section under the site menu is a good place to begin. There are six regions with hundreds of stocked and special regulation streams that are ideal for fly fishing. Take advantage of the maps to explore the areas you want to travel.

A little searching with some of those new stream names in the forums and stream reports can usually yield a string of information. A host of highly regarded authors can be found in the Fly Fishing Books section. Some good old fashion book reading is worth some time.

A quick trek to the PFBC website can offer an additional collection of streams and detailed regulations.

Finally, time with your local fly shop and Trout Unlimited Chapter are wonderful places to meet up with others. They can provide any number of classes, workshops, and conservation opportunities.

With the arm chair work complete go explore the state. Some of the best places you’ll find will likely be the ones you didn’t set out for when you got started. There may not be an easy button here, but the journey is part of the catch.
Resized Image

  Send article

Published by Dave Kile [davekile] on 03/19/2009 (3876 reads)
by Woody Banks

Resized Image

Fly selection can be most complex for the fly fisher during an insect hatch. During a hatch the fish feed selectively on the most abundant insect form in or on the water. To be armed with the perfect imitation, in size, form, and color, for each phase of every hatch he may encounter, the fly fisherman would need hundreds of fly patterns in dozens of sizes. One current catalog lists forty-six patterns in five sizes to imitate the phases of one mayfly's life cycle.

Mayfly color can vary considerably, even during the same hatch on the same riffle. Under different light and water conditions, a fly can take a variety of manifestations to the trout. Flies appear differently to fish on cloudy days,on bright days, under the direct light at noon, and in the low angle light of morning and evening. Fish perceive flies differently on riffles than on smooth slicks. Murky water following a rain will alter the trouts view of a fly.

  Send article

Published by Dave Kile [Dave] on 02/25/2009 (10639 reads)
A recent update to the site includes new Google Maps of all the Special Regulation Streams in Pennsylvania. The stream locations are divided up into six areas of the state. The new maps provide an easier and more visual way to find many of the states special projects that focus on some of the best trout fishing in Pennsylvania.

Resized Image

The power of Google Maps help provide detail locations and easy driving directions to over a hundred fabulous locations across the state.

The project has been a special collaboration of many of the PaFlyFish members who really provided expertise on the locations of the streams. The new maps provide the framework for more and new information about stream locations across the state.

  Send article

RSS Feed



Site Content
Sponsors
Stay Connected

twitterfeed.com facebook instagram RSS Feed

The New Keystone Fly Fishing Book
Polls
Do You Have or Will You Obtain Multiple State Fishing License’s for 2018?
Yes
No
_PL_TOTALVOTES
The poll will close at 2018/7/20 10:51
4 Comments





Copyright 2018 by PaFlyFish.com | Privacy Policy| Provided by Kile Media Group | Design by 7dana.com