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Fly Tying  Fly Tying
Fly Tying Instructions - Black Foam Beetle

Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 2011/5/11 (7199 reads)
By FlyfishingNZ


Sulphur EmergerIt is almost time for the sulphurs (ephemerella dorothea) to start appearing on Spring Creek, my local PA trout stream. The hatch starts around the beginning of May and you can expect to see them up until the end of June, however with this years weather it could be all over the place. While the weather is bad and the rivers blown out it is time to experiment with tying for this hatch.

For the sulphur tying swap I decided to put together this little number that also incorporates a number of skills I picked up from Oliver Edwards. This is not completely my own creation but my inclusion of a weaved body makes the fly that little bit more interesting. By using a weave it is possible to achieve a two tone body section which can not be easily achieve with straight tying techniques, unless you little marker pens.

This fly sits low in the film surface and the tail section should sit below the film giving the trout that perfect silhouette. Even before the sulphur hatch has begun I have seen some very nice trout being fooled into taking this fly.

I hope that you enjoy this step-by-step guide to my weaved body sulphur emerger and it brings you much enjoy on the river as it has for me.

Tight Lines,

FlyfishingNZ

Step by Step Guide after break


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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 2011/3/27 (4647 reads)
By Alan Ritt

Ritt’s Fighting CrayfishThere are times when I just don’t feel inspired to sit down and tie more of “the same.” Whether “the same” means flies others and I have tied for years, or it means patterns I’ve conjured up and like to think of as more or less mine. The point is a change is needed.

During one of these restless periods a decade or so ago I was thinking to myself that I didn’t fish nearly enough large flies. You know, the ones regularly hanging from the jaws of those fish in the pictures of each day’s newest instant hero. Not that I felt like I should be that hero, but sometimes you just want a shot at a larger fish. Another streamer or leech pattern just wasn’t what I was craving though. I wanted something more interesting. My mind gravitated to the crayfish.

Though there were a lot of effective crayfish patterns around, I wasn’t convinced there weren’t improvements to be made. I needed a pattern that would swim, crawl or rest in a realistic posture and was snag resistant enough to fish around cover where crayfish are commonly found. The details of the trial and error are entertaining stories of their own (like the version that, though heavily weighted, floated in the surface film).

Suffice it to say I did come up with a pattern that has been extremely effective for many species of fish and in many types of water and fishing conditions. The pattern incorporates the hard shiny carapace and multitude of legs, antennae and other appendages of the natural. It has lots of movement in the water, even when not being actively manipulated. The hook not only rides up, but the posture of the fly places the hook eye down and the bend up in the water column to make it relatively snag free even without a weed guard (or fish guard as I think of them). And unlike all other crayfish patterns I’ve seen, the main arms and claws do not lay limply behind the fly as if it was dead, but are held high like a natural warding off a predator and collapse behind the fly when stripped just as a live crayfish holds them when swimming.

I’ve used this fly myself to catch trout, largemouth and smallmouth bass, bluegills, crappie, bullheads, silver salmon and bonefish. Others have told me of catching carp, walleye and pike as well. Below is the recipe, vary the color to match the crayfish in your local waters (there are many variations) and let me know how you do! My flies are available on MyFlies.com and also my own web site has patterns and information on my tying demo appearances, lessons, guide services and flies as well as my contact information below.
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 2011/2/7 (2968 reads)
Quill Gordon Crippled Real Wing
by Sandfly

quillBack in the late 60’s and early 70’s while fishing in the Pocono’s I fished the early season hatches there every year. The first big hatch was the Quill Gordon hatch. While the wet fly and nymph were productive the dry fly was not so productive for me. Even though I used the standard pattern I could not get consistent takes.

For years this went on and I became frustrated with the hatch. After moving to Ansonia in 2006 I found there is a heavy hatch of Quill Gordon's here at times on Pine Creek.

Again I was frustrated by the lack of surface takes on my flies I used. I experimented with different dries for the Quill Gordon with the same results. I think it was because the flies pop so fast the trout didn’t want them so much.

While sitting on the bank one day watching the hatch I saw a brown feeding on the surface. As I watched I noticed he was taking flies that were not riding high but the ones riding low in the surface. I went home and tied a few down wing flies and went back the next day.

They worked I started getting more fish on the down wing. I thought I could come up with a better fly yet and sat down and tied the Quill Gordon Crippled using raffia for the wing instead of the old standby of wood duck. Along with this I changed the body from a quill body to a dubbed dirty olive/yellow dubbing with a peacock quill rib. This did it and my catch rates went up.

Now when the Quill Gordon’s are hatching I make sure I have these in my box along with the old patterns too.
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 2011/1/28 (3311 reads)
Congratulations to Paflyfish member Dean Myers (djmyers) for winning the Grand Prize at the national fly-tying contest sponsored by Feather-Craft Fly Fishing. Dean recently was featured on Paflyfish with his Blue Winged Olive CDC Cripple tie posted in the blog back in September.

fallDean's original award winning Chain Gang Stonefly is designed with a unique thorax that helps the fly sink quickly.

Myer's is a resident of Lancaster County and when not tying is a full time computer programmer in New Holland, Pa.

More details about the is annoucement can be found at the the fly tying contest website here.

More of Dean's flies can be found over at MyFlies.com.
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 2011/1/10 (4278 reads)
By Matt Kern (mkern)

greg"I created this fly for a few reasons. Mainly because I never seemed to catch fish on caddis, but I knew how abundant they were in most streams. I heard people rave about LaFontaine’s Sparkle Pupa all the time, but didn’t really like the fly itself. I read/heard how the antron formed a bubble much like the natural as the fly ascends to the surface to hatch. I definitely wanted to recreate that bubble on the caddis pupa, but try and be a little more “realistic” (well as realistic as feathers and fur can get.) So I decided to create my own version.

Little did I know that the material that I selected to represent the bubble (the vinyl tubing) would do more than look like trapped air. It also acts like a bumper on a car. It allows the fly to bounce along the bottom, but there is a better feature yet… The softness of the tubing gives the angler another second to set the hook. The tubing is soft and the fish tend to chew it longer, or not reject it as soon.

I almost always use one of these flies in a tandem rig. It can have a bunch of weight to get the rest of the flies down and catches fish every outing for me. I will say, in the “non-peek” caddis seasons I tend to hook smaller fish, but the opposite is true in early Spring and in the Fall. The color scheme I show here is not the only one. You can tie many variations as well, like yellow-bellied, tan-bellied, cream-bellied, etc. There is also very little wasted materials with this fly. This is a fly I like to use year round.

Matt started fly tying and fishing about 10 years ago. He has worked at E. Hille's back in 2006 - 2007 as a custom fly tyer and rod builder. Matt offers a fly tying club at the school where he teaches.
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 2010/12/13 (3901 reads)
By David Weaver

Scuds, or freshwater shrimp, are a staple in the diet of trout. Here in Pennsylvania, they’re associated mainly with limestone streams but in my experience they are widespread in many waters although they are indeed especially numerous in the famous limestoners.

Here in the Cumberland Valley I use scud flies year round and rely on them greatly during the colder months of the year.

Many scud flies, in my opinion, are tied too bulky and stubby.

If you look at scuds, take the time to observe them while they’re actually in the water: they tend to be rather elongated, usually dark olive in color, and they are strong swimmers in short bursts, moving several inches with a strong wiggle motion. Upon coming to rest, they return to the curled shape.

scud"Cress bugs or “sow bugs” by contrast, aren’t swimmers and dead drift when dislodged. Many tiers prefer their scuds heavily weighted by I prefer them un-weighted. This seems to work well for me when sight nymphing.

When you see a trout rooting in weeds – a common sight on weedy limestoners – they’re usually in pretty shallow water or up high against weed beds. An un-weighted scud can be cast ahead of the fish and won’t plunge down in the weeds and snag. Remember, when flushed out from weeds and cover, scuds will dart. As your un-weighted scud drifts toward the trout, give it a twitch and watch that trout!



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Published by Ryan Gouldsbarry [ryguyfi] on 2010/10/18 (3773 reads)
Steelhead fishing is an addiction. It keeps you up at night. It causes you to daydream at work. It is something that you can’t explain; you have to experience it. We in Pennsylvania have a world class fisherie in the great lakes system and some of us have never relished in it’s beauty. It becons me every fall, through the winter and into the spring. It calls my name, and I answer it as often as possible. The thrill of an 8lb fish, that feels like a freight train on the end of your line, in often freezing cold conditions, is truly amazing.

MarcellusI write to you today as an addict, and as I quote flipnfly, “one who doesn’t want an intervention”. Here below is my recipe for a simple single yarn egg pattern. When the steelhead are in full spawn, it is hard for them to turn down a good looking egg. Yet in my experience I have added a few steps to make this fly more durable. During a good steelhead run, the thrill is also landing one fish quickly so you can get onto the next. It can be non-stop action, so having to tie on another fly because yours has been destroyed, or torn off the hook may cost you your next fish. I hope that my experience and slight changes may bring you more fish to hand.

More after the break
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