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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 09/27/2021 (25 reads)


Fall Fly Fishing in Pennsylvania
Recorded on September 21, 2021

The fall season offers some great weather and outstanding fly fishing after the heat of the summer. Trout behavior and hatches change during the autumn months, but there is plenty of angling opportunities if you know what to do. If you are looking at extending your fly fishing season this fall then join Derek Eberly and Dave Kile for a presentation on Fall Fly Fishing in Pennsylvania.



Summer Warm Water Fishing in Small Streams
Recorded on July 27, 2021

Are you looking to continue fly fishing even as the summer heats up? Then join Dave Weaver and Dave Kile as they take a fun look at warm water fishing tactics and techniques for the Pennsylvania region.


Bugs for Beginners
Recorded on April 7, 2021

Are you trying to make sense of the hatches, flies, and trout? Join Dave Kile as he provides an overview of the most common mayfly insects that trout feed on and their lifecycles. He will offer up an explanation about how and when these insect hatches occur in the Pennsylvania region. The presentation will cover how to "Match the Hatch" and help you improve your fly fishing experience.



April Fly Fishing in Northcentral Pennsylvania
Recorded on March 18, 2021

Join Dave Allbaugh and Dave Kile as they take a look at April Fly Fishing in Northcentral Pennsylvania. Dave Allbaugh a Johnstown native, licensed guide and experienced angler in Northcentral Pennsylvania since the 1970s. Dave is widely known for his unique expertise in wet fly fishing and tying. With spring just getting started, the April hatches offer up some of the first opportunities to plan for some much-anticipated fly fishing. We will take a look at where, when, and how to make the most of the early spring fly fishing season on streams like Kettle Creek, First Fork and Big Pine.

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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 09/13/2021 (91 reads)
Fall Fly Fishing 2021

The fall season offers some great weather and outstanding fly fishing after the heat of the summer. Trout behavior and hatches change during the autumn months, but there is plenty of angling opportunities if you know what to do. If you are looking at extending your fly fishing season this fall then join Derek Eberly and Dave Kile for a presentation on Fall Fly Fishing in Pennsylvania.

Topics
What’s different about trout fall behavior
Seasonal hatches and trout food
Flies and tactics
Where to find locations near you
Gear and clothing
Your questions and answers

Derek Eberly
Derek has been fly-fishing across Pennsylvania for over 20 years and he started his guide service, Keystone Fly Guides in 2013. Recently Derek joined Sky Blue Outfitters and is looking forward to working with their team to offer quality fly fishing experiences across the state. He has been a perpetual student of the sport and enjoys sharing what he has learned with others. Derek is a certified casting instructor through Fly Fishers International.

Dave Kile
Dave has been fly fishing for over 35 years and is the founder of Paflyfish, an online community of fly fishing anglers in the Pennsylvania region founded in 1995. He was recognized in 2014 by the Cumberland Valley Trout Unlimited with the Charles K. Fox Rising Trout Award.

Audience: Novice anglers
Date: Tuesday, September 21 at 7:00 PM
Where: Online Zoom Presentation
Register in advance for this event: https://bit.ly/3ln7RY2

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.
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Published by Michael [raftman] on 08/16/2021 (307 reads)
I was selected as an Artist in Residence for The Bob Marshall Wilderness Area, which gave me the opportunity to spend two weeks deep in the backcountry of The Bob Marshall Wilderness (technically, I was in the Great Bear Wilderness, but it’s part of The Bob) in Montana to write and explore. Mules packed all my gear into an old Forest Service cabin that had propane lights and a stove. No running water, no electricity, and an abundance of mice. The cabin sat on a high ledge above the river which gave me access to plenty of fishing for Westslope Cutthroat Trout and Whitefish, a number of trails for hiking, and a great view to watch while I spent each first and last light writing.

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The fishing was incredible. I fished four flies the entire two weeks: a purple foam hopper, a caddis, a purple haze, and a streamer (occasionally, when it got really windy). They seemed to be keyed in on anything purple. At first, I had trouble getting my timing down — the river was crystal clear and I would watch these cutthroats come up for my fly from ten feet away and get excited and set the hook way too early. I switched over to my McFarland 7’6” 4 wt Spruce Creek fiberglass rod which forced me to slow down. I ended up catching most of the fish on that (including some pretty big ones). It was a blast. Simple. Easy. Consistent.

I also hiked up a few mountains while I was there (which I go into more detail on in my blog post). It was a pretty amazing experience, but it wasn’t without its difficulties. Hiking and flyfishing in grizzly country (The Bob has the highest density of grizzlies in the lower 48) was a challenge and forced me to be hyper attentive (I did meet a grizzly, but I’ll save that story for the blog…). I also knew that if I slipped or tripped or fell while fishing or hiking that it’d be a long while before anyone could come get me or find me. It was also a struggle being so completely alone and cut-off from the outside world for two weeks. The only news I’d get was wildfire smoke and the occasional chatter on the Forest Service radio I had with me (my only connection to the outside world). Mentally & emotionally, this was really hard, but I’m really glad I did it. It pushed me into places I would have never gone in my writing.

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If you’re looking to fish this area, reach out and I can provide more specifics. Most people access these watersheds with pack rafts (I saw quite a few go through while I was there). There is one rafting company that floats clients down the river (though I had a not-so-great experience with them when they floated ten clients through the run I was fishing and had each one fish it while I was standing a few feet from them on the bank. I did catch a big cutthroat just as the last group passed and they watched me land it which felt good), if guided fishing and camping is your thing. The only other way to access this area is to backpack into it, which requires grizzly and wilderness know-how (there is a section of this river that is “front country” and runs parallel to Route 2 and into/around Glacier National Park). Surprisingly, there aren’t a ton of campsites and most aren’t marked. It’s wild. It’s off-the-beaten-path. It’s great.

I am incredibly grateful for the opportunity to explore this wilderness and hope I can honor it in my writing. I wrote up a more detailed blogpost that goes through my daily experiences and includes a lot more photos which you can check out here.

Author Bio:
Michael Garrigan writes and teaches along the banks of the Susquehanna River in Pennsylvania and believes that every watershed should have a Poet Laureate. He enjoys exploring the river’s many tributaries with a fly rod for wild trout and hiking the riverlands. He is the author of two poetry collections — Robbing the Pillars and the chapbook What I Know [How to Do]. His poetry and essays have appeared in The Flyfish Journal, Gray’s Sporting Journal, and The Drake Magazine. You can find more of his writing (and order signed copies of his books) at www.mgarrigan.com.
 
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 08/09/2021 (200 reads)
One of my favorite flies and has enabled me to catch my trout is the Rusty Spinner. This all-purpose fly imitates several different insects during a few different periods of its adult lifecycle. As a spinner, it naturally mimics the last stage of a fly when laying eggs or dying on the water. I have had some awesome days during a hatch used as a cripple or emerger. They are very useful when you get stumped as to the correct hatch as they are easy pickings for a hungry trout. I always keep a good supply of size #18 through #8 at the ready in exclusively rusty brown dubbing. But, always try your own styles and see what works best for you.



Trident Fly Fishing is a sponsor of Paflyfish and please support them for your online orders.
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 07/29/2021 (249 reads)
Are you looking to continue fly fishing even as the summer heats up? Then join Dave Weaver and Dave Kile as they take a look at warm water fishing tactics and techniques for the Pennsylvania region.

Topics
Why small warm water creeks are overlooked
Species, with emphasis on sunfish, rock bass and smallmouth bass
Scouting & public access
Safety issues/clothing
Flies and tactics

Dave Weaver
Is a history teacher in Gettysburg Pennsylvania and a moderator at Paflyfish. He is an award-winning artist specializing in fly fishing-related topics. Dave has been fly fishing small streams in Pennsylvania for over forty years. A special thanks to Dave Weaver for putting this together. Please follow him on Instagram here : https://www.instagram.com/dave_wgettysburg/

Dave Kile
Is the founder of Paflyfish, an online community of fly fishing anglers in the Pennsylvania region founded in 1995.

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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 07/19/2021 (286 reads)
Are you looking to continue fly fishing even as the summer heats up? Then join Dave Weaver and Dave Kile as they take a fun look at warm water fishing tactics and techniques for the Pennsylvania region.

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Topics
Why small warm water creeks are overlooked
Species, with emphasis on sunfish, rock bass and smallmouth bass
Scouting & public access
Safety issues/clothing
Wading and boating
Flies and tactics
Questions and Answers

Dave Weaver
Is a history teacher in Gettysburg Pennsylvania and a moderator at Paflyfish. He is an award-winning artist specializing in fly fishing-related topics. Dave has been fly fishing small streams in Pennsylvania for over forty years.

Dave Kile
Is the founder of Paflyfish, an online community of fly fishing anglers in the Pennsylvania region founded in 1995.

Date: Tuesday, July 27 at 8:00 PM
Where: Online Zoom Presentation
Register in advance for this meeting: https://bit.ly/3BlDYyq

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

You can see more of Dave Weaver's great artwork on his Instagram account.
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 06/25/2021 (407 reads)
George Daniel Discusses Dry Dropper Tactics in Central PA




It all began at age 6 when George caught his first trout on a fly rod. Since that day, George has been addicted to fly fishing. George is a former competitive angler for Fly Fishing Team USA, former Coach for both USA Youth and Adult Fly Fishing Teams. He has written three books and has published countless articles for fly fishing magazines. Currently, he is the director and lead instructor for the Pennsylvania State University’s Angling Program-a positioned once held by George’s fly fishing mentor, Joe Humphreys. George is also an on-stream instructor and runs clinics/presentations throughout the US. You can find more on George at is website.
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Published by Dave Weaver [Dave_W] on 06/14/2021 (314 reads)

To the fly tiers of PAFF, a hearty thank you for your efforts in supporting the Rivers Conservation and Fly Fishing Youth Camp. I had put in a request for fly donations (original thread) and many of you donated your time and materials to produce some excellent flies. The camp director, upon receiving the flies, was very appreciative, calling them a "game changer," as donations were lower this year. The students will be meeting soon on the Yellow Breeches and will put the flies to good use. The youth camp was conceived by Jack Beck of Cumberland Valley Trout Unlimited who pondered why America had all sorts of youth camps for various sports and other activities, but not cold water conservation. Today, the CVTU youth camp sets the standard for a variety of similarly themed youth camps and puts teenagers in hands-on activities including building stream improvement structures, fly tying and macro-invertebrate study. In the mornings and evenings, the students get to apply what they learned by fly fishing on Yellow Breeches.

Thanks,
Dave_W

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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 06/02/2021 (467 reads)
This past January made it very difficult to plan a few weeks out let alone several months. The normal Spring May Jamboree was officially put on hold again. Unofficially, the Sulphurs, March Browns and Green Drakes would still be hatching.

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Many of the usual crew made it up for the weekend and stayed at Seven Mountains Campground. The weather was great and we were able to enjoy a couple of good nights of catching up, listening to music, and even enjoying some of the pizzas from Bruno’s oven. Plenty of music from Shakey and Turkey added to the evenings.

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Saturday morning turned into an impromptu casting clinic with Derek helping a few new and experienced anglers with some techniques. Which came in handy for our fly fishing during the weekend.

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Back to the fly fishing. On the first evening of the Unofficial Jam, Afishinado and I went over to the Little J with the anticipation of an evening Sulphur hatch. We made an important dinner stop at the Spruce Creek Tavern for some burgers, beers and fries before hitting the water. A great joint to hit if you are in the area.

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Afishinado picked slower and softer water to fish. I stuck to some faster ripples for the evening. I got into a few bringing up many fish in the faster water at about 6:30. It got slow at about 7:30 and then when the Sulphur hatch hit we did very well.

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Saturday most of the crew made their way to Penns Creek and Tunnel Road. A slow day, but plenty of Sulphurs and spinners in the evening. Unfortunately, the evening was as challenging as the day even with all the bugs. Our first day on Penns proved again to be a bit of mystery.

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On Sunday Maurice and I left the Jam and made our way downstream towards Millmont for several extra days on Penns. Once downstream it was a pleasant surprise to find Coffin Flies galore and some Green Drakes around the stream. So naturally, we settled into our new place and found our way to Class A for some Brookie fishing. A fun diversion from the big water and we got into a few nice trout.

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We tried to make a go of it at Glen Iron to find more Coffin Flies, but no Green Drakes hatching. A quiet night for me, but Sulphurs upstream for Maurice and some fish. We were 100 yards apart and we had completely different experiences. We got back to our place to find our place covered in Coffin Flies along the banks. The street light tracked thousands. We had so many Green Drakes and spinners in our place we found them in the kitchen, shower, and bedrooms for days.

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Things improved for me Monday night with the Sulphur hatch around Weikert. The Green Drakes had a big hatch occur about 10:00 am that morning. Which we missed so we really didn’t see any Monday night.

Tuesday we moved upstream and finally find a good location of some steady Green Drakes. I think I must have missed almost 18 fish with a Green Drake pattern. We did get a few. It seemed like the steady risers were the biggest fish. That evening I did okay with my B-52 Rusty Spinners during the evening bug fest that started at about 8:15.

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Penns Creek really sucks me in with the trout and beautiful setting. It was fun to hang out with Maurice and find some new places. I caught one of my better wild browns on drake at almost 20”. Penns is not easy on the legs with all those greased bowling balls on the stream bed. It can really beat you up and to think when I was younger I would run around there without a wading staff? Another great trip, as I caught more than I normally do on Penns, but she is a tough mother.

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In a lot of ways, it was one of my best trips out in many years. Seeing everyone again was great. Making time for a six-day trip makes a huge difference in your approach to fishing and where you go. Looking forward to next year when we can get back on track for a normal 2022 Spring Jamboree!
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 06/01/2021 (71898 reads)
Green Drake

Recently going through my mayfly photographs I found a nice set of pictures from the Paflyfish Spring Jam in 2010. The Green Drake (Ephemera guttulata ) hatch was in full swing that year and photographs of these mayflies were easy and plentiful. Most of the weekend was overcast and rain as normally forecasted for the Spring Jam. Emergers (subimago) and spinners (imago) were not so much active during the day but lined the sides of the streams in the hundreds of thousands. I am always torn between fishing and photography on days like this but glad to put down my fly rod for a while and captured a lot of great shots.

With so many mayflies and photos, it was easy to get so nice shots of the Green Drake spinners, which are referred to as Coffin Flies because of their white extended body. I wanted to demonstrate the differences between spinner (imago) male and female. These two Coffin Flies attached show these differences. Most notably the male has longer extended forelegs and claspers at the rear of the body. Females as seen do not have these body characteristics.

Male (left photo)
Long forelegs
Rear claspers or forceps at the rear of the body
Eyes on a male tend to be larger

Female (right photo)
Short foreleg
Forceps do not exist
Smaller flatter eyes






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