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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 08/04/2016 (2578 reads)
DCNR, Fish & Boat Move to Protect Wild Trout Fishery in Sections of Penns Creek in Bald Eagle State Forest
HARRISBURG, Pa. (Aug. 4) - Moving to protect wild trout beset by high water temperatures and low stream levels, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR) and Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC) officials temporarily have posted two sections of Penns Creek to prevent fishing and disturbance of massed fish by passersby.

“The prolonged combination of little rainfall and steadily climbing water temperatures has left wild trout massing at two locations in Bald Eagle State Forest where mountain streams are supplying needed oxygen and cooler water,” said State Forester Dan Devlin. “The goal is to prevent additional stress by limiting angling pressure and the chances of others needlessly spooking them.”

Both located in Mifflin County, not far from the Union-Centre County line, the posted areas affording trout thermal protection are along Penns Creek at the mouths of the Panther Run and Swift Run tributaries. As temperatures soared and stream levels dropped, trout have increasingly sought out these tributaries’ cooler waters.

“In an effort to gain support and protect this valuable resource we sought cooperation from the Fish and Boat Commission, and its bureaus of law enforcement and fisheries responded rapidly,” Devlin said, “clearing the way for a joint effort that will limit disturbance to fish in these areas. This limited and temporary closure is based solely on the need to provide areas of thermal refuge.”

This is not the first time the premier trout stream, harboring a unique, wild trout fishery that draws anglers from around the world, has been taxed by severe weather conditions. In 1999, trout were forced to congregate by the hundreds in coldwater tributary mouths along Penns Creek, and reports of harassment surfaced.

The Mifflin County postings, to be enforced by DCNR Rangers and PFBC Waterways Conservation Officers, will remain in effect until Penns Creek water conditions improve -- and that may take some time. The state Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) early this week issued a drought-watch declaration for 34 Pennsylvania counties, including Mifflin, Union and Centre counties. All are reporting low stream flows, declining groundwater levels and below-normal precipitation. Rainfall deficits of as much as 6.0 inches have been noted over the past 90 days.

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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 07/22/2016 (1383 reads)
Well forget that new rod this year, just get a custom high-end SUV built for fly fishing anglers. I think one in green would match my waders.

Bentley Bentayga ?? Mulliner


From the press release:

Bentley has created the ultimate angling accessory; the new Bentayga Fly Fishing by Mulliner.

Hand-crafted by Bentley’s bespoke coachbuilding division, the Bentayga Fly Fishing by Mulliner is an exquisite installation which houses all the equipment required for a successful day on the river.

Four rods are stored in special tubes trimmed in Saddle leather with Linen cross-stitching and located on the underside of the parcel shelf. A pair of landing nets in matching leather bags are stored in a bespoke, carpet-trimmed hard pocket built into the side of the boot.

At the heart of the Bentayga Fly Fishing by Mulliner are three individual, Saddle-leather-trimmed units: a master tackle station; a refreshment case; and waterproof wader-stowage trunk.

The master tackle station and refreshment case sit on a sliding tray that allows for easy access. Inside the master tackle unit is a special Burr Walnut veneered drawer containing a fly-tying vice and tools, as well as a selection of cotton, hooks and feathers. Beneath this are four machined-from-solid aluminium reel cases trimmed in Saddle leather with a Linen cross-stitching. The interior of the refreshment case is trimmed in Linen leather, and contains up to three metal flasks and a set of Mulliner fine-china tableware, as well as a separate food storage compartment. With a quilted leather finish on top, it can also be removed entirely and used as additional seating.

Waders and boots are conveniently stowed in a hand-crafted and Saddle-leather-wrapped wood trunk, lined with hard-wearing neoprene material to keep the items in a waterproof environment after use.

Of course, all three units can be removed from the Bentayga’s boot whenever maximum luggage space is required.

Waterproof boot-floor and rear-sill-protection covers are discreetly integrated into the rear of the Bentayga Fly Fishing by Mulliner, as is an electronic dehumidifier unit to ensure the area remains fresh and dry.

Bentley Bentayga ?? Mulliner


For the first time with Bentayga, Mulliner ‘Welcome Lights’ are also featured. These are built into the underside of the doors and project the Bentley and Mulliner logos on to the ground when the doors are opened. In addition as a bespoke option, any personal logo or graphic can be individually specified on a customer’s Bentayga order.

Geoff Dowding, Director of Mulliner, said: “The Bentayga Fly Fishing car showcases the breadth and level of detail a customer can expect from Mulliner. This is an individual bespoke solution and our skilled craftspeople can design elegant and exquisitely executed bespoke solutions to complement any customer lifestyle or hobby. Fly fishing is a sport that requires a variety of equipment and clothing, so it was essential to package the rods, reels, waders, boots and fly-tying station into the car in a luxurious, accessible and elegant way – and the end result is truly extraordinary.”

If you have to ask...well you know the answer.



Published by David Weaver [Fishidiot] on 07/10/2016 (8405 reads)
JOHN BROWN’S BASS
By
Dave Weaver
Photographs and artwork courtesy of author

Potomac Fly Fishing


Harper’s Ferry is a quiet place where the gentle hiss of river current is the only consistent sound, especially at night. It was quiet a century and a half ago on the night of October 16th, 1859 as less than two dozen men, led by the messianic abolitionist from Kansas, John Brown, crossed the Potomac and slipped into the town streets to initiate what Brown believed would be the end of slavery in America. A staunch Calvinist who believed that he was on a mission from God to end slavery, Brown intended to bring to life his favorite passage from the Bible: “Without the shedding of blood, there is no remission of sins.” The sin of slavery would be paid for with Brown’s own blood if need be.

Thomas Jefferson said that the view from Harper’s Ferry Virginia (now West Virginia) where the Potomac and Shenandoah Rivers join was so “stupendous” as to be worth a trip across the Atlantic just to see its beauty. Thirty three years after our third President’s death, this little town saw played out what was arguably the seminal event leading to the Civil War – a drama seen through the lens of terrorism or martyrdom. Today, the bass fishing is fabulous in and around this tiny town so woven into the fabric of our nation’s past. For those fishermen with a historical bent, it’s easy to miss the strikes of hard hitting smallmouths due to the irresistible temptation to gaze at nearby Maryland Heights where Stonewall Jackson’s guns blasted the town into submission in 1862 (and forcing the largest surrender of Union forces in the Civil War); or the stately stone Harper house; or the old railroad bridge; or the fire engine house where Brown and his holdouts took cover; or any of a host of intriguing sites. A fisherman in the river is surrounded by bass under the surface and three states on the shorelines. So much to see, catch, and think about…so little time.

rusty spinnerAlthough largely a National Park today, Harper’s Ferry was an industrial town conceived by George Washington as a serendipitously located government factory village where converging waterways, upstream from the new capital, would drive the production of armaments for the incipient military of a fledgling nation. Jefferson’s protégé, Captain Meriwether Lewis, was provisioned for his Corp of Discovery here. By the mid Nineteenth Century the country had become consumed by the controversy over the expansion of slavery and Brown, a man who by all accounts had failed at every endeavor he’d undertaken, had pledged his life to the struggle against the South’s “peculiar institution” and set his sights on Harper’s Ferry.

John Brown was completely committed. Some thought him mad. After cutting his teeth in Bleeding Kansas where he committed several heinous murders of defenseless pro slavery men, Brown concocted a plan to move his personal war against slavery east and seize Harper’s Ferry and its weapons. He believed when news of his capture of the town spread that slaves to the south would hear the news and, undoubtedly with the help of divine providence, rise up against their masters and march in unison to join Brown, from whom they would receive the captured weapons. Thus armed, a slave revolt would snowball across the land and the institution of slavery would fall. When Brown proposed his plan to some prominent abolitionists in the North he was mostly rebuffed. Frederick Douglas thought his plan impossible and refused to participate. Nevertheless, Brown did get some backing by some who shared the growing frustration of many abolitionists who had come to feel that speechifying, rhetoric, and the publishing of treatises were toothless against the nation’s great sin.

rusty spinnerAfter several months of planning on a farm in Maryland, Brown was ready to strike. When he and his band crept into town that night they had, nevertheless, taken no rations with them nor did Brown seem to have any systematic operational plan to hold the town, spread the news, and develop the situation. It was a mess from the start. The raiders sent out parties in the night to detain local citizens and confiscate weapons and Harper’s Ferry remained fairly quiet through the night, but word soon began to spread and by daybreak local citizens, having discovered something awry, began a steady resistance and gunfire grew louder. The blood of locals, some innocent bystanders, and Brown’s followers began to flow in the streets. Brown seemed not to know what to do next and by morning had lost the initiative to a growing force of local militiamen and armed citizens. The local militiamen, enraged at the “vile abolitionists” and eager to avenge the deaths of townspeople, mutilated the bodies of some of Brown’s followers or cast them into the river. Panic and rumors soon spread across Virginia that an army of abolitionists were swarming down from the north and that a slave revolt was brewing. Many Southerners thought the raid a distraction, just the beginning of a larger assault. The South’s Great Nightmare seemed to be coming to life.

Although groundless, the rumors fueled a massive reaction with ripple effects felt in Washington by afternoon. On temporary duty in the Capital was Colonel Robert E. Lee and a reaction force of several dozen Marines and a couple field guns were hurriedly marshaled, placed under his command, and sent by train to Harper’s Ferry to put down what Lee called the “insurgents” and their “gross outrage against law and order.” Following this force were hundreds of militiamen and local vigilantes galvanized by the sensationalized headlines and rumors.

rusty spinnerBy the time Lee and his force reached the town in the pre-dawn hours of the 18th, much of the fighting had died down and Brown and his remaining fighters and their hostages had holed up in a fire engine house from which they had managed to keep up enough gunfire to hold the townspeople and militiamen at bay. The situation stalemated, a tense calm had settled over the town.

Lee had a lieutenant named J.E.B. Stuart, under a flag of truce, approach the engine house and offer terms. Brown refused and spent the rest of the night barricading the doors and preparing his defense. He had only a couple followers left unscathed. The local African Americans who he’d coerced into his force showed little enthusiasm for the fight. At dawn, Stuart returned to the engine house, received Brown’s final refusal to surrender, and the Marines promptly began their assault, battering the doors with hammers and eventually breaking through using a ladder as a ram. The troops quickly overwhelmed the defenders, killing one of Brown’s sons in the fight. Brown himself was struck down, wounded by a sword blow from Lieutenant Green who had led the assault into the engine house. Unapologetic and defiant, Brown was hauled off to face trail for insurrection and what he undoubtedly knew was an inevitable date with the gallows.

Part 2 of 2

Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 06/07/2016 (3076 reads)
It has been a few years since we held a photo contest and we are due to recognize some of the fantastic anglers on this site who share some some wonderful images from their fly fishing experiences. Paflyfish is holding a fly fishing photo contest this spring. All photographic skill levels are encouraged to participate.

Winning photos will be displayed on the Paflyfish website and social media sites. We have prizes from our friends at Allen Fly Fishing, Orvis-Plymouth Meeting, Harman’s Luxury Log Cabins and Cutthroat Furled Leaders.

Paflyfish

2009 Josh Slaymaker's - Sal on the Letort


Both amateur and professional photographers are welcome to participate. Photos must be submitted in digital format; see contest rules for details.

Each participant may submit one photograph in total. All images must be digitally uploaded. You can upload your images at the photo section. Select the “2016 Spring Photo Contest” Category when submitting your photograph.

Paflyfish

2013 Tomitrout's - Anticipation


Start Date: March 21, 2016 at 12:00 AM, EST End Date: June 19, 2016 at 11:00 PM EST. We’re not responsible for errors that may terminate the contest early so enter soon.

Sorry for the length and this is intended to be fun, but most all questions can be answered by reading the rules and directions below. Please read!

No payment necessary to enter or win

Photo Eligibility
To enter, you must be at least 18 years of age and a U.S. citizen. Paflyfish.com employees, moderators and their immediate family members are not eligible. All photos must be taken in Pennsylvania region, which includes: New York, New Jersey, Maryland and Ohio during the timeframe of the contest. The photo subject must be relevant to fly fishing in the region. Photos must be taken during spring of 2016. Do not submit previous season photographs or from another year.

How to Enter
Digital photos may be submitted online only. You must register on the PalyFish.com website. Previously uploaded photographs can not be resubmitted. You can upload your images in the photo section. Select the “2016 Spring Photo Contest” Category when submitting your photograph. Entries must be received by the deadline (see above). Digital images will not be returned. No mail or postal entries accepted.

Image Modifications:
Minor digital enhancement is permitted, but images that have been significantly modified or appear unnatural will be disqualified.
Not Permitted:
* No borders or frames may be added to images.
* No watermarks, signatures, or copyright notices may be added to images. All winning images will be displayed with the photographer's name.

Photo Formats
Entries must be digital JPEG images and images should be 1024 pixels on the longest side at 72PPI. Please read the specific guidelines for submitting prints and digital images. Winning entries may be requested to provide larger available images.

Judging
Entries will be judged on the basis of creativity, photographic quality, and effectiveness in conveying the beauty and/or unique character of fly fishing in the region.

Winners
Judges will select a first, second and third place winning photos. Winners will be announced on the website and notified approximately 2-3 weeks after the contest deadline by website private messaging and email using the information provided in your Paflyfish.com website registration. Winning photographs, along with the photographer's name, email address (optional) and information about the photo, will be displayed on the Paflyfish.com website.

Photographer/Copyright
Entries must be submitted by the original photographer. Do not submit a photo taken by someone other than yourself. You must be the sole owner of the copyright of any image submitted. Your submission of the photo and entry form is your guarantee that you are the author and copyright holder of the photo.

Photo Subject Restrictions
We cannot accept photos that contain any nudity and follow site guidelines. Paflyfish.com retains sole discretion as to what constitutes inappropriate content. Winners will be selected based on several criteria including, originality, theme, technical & artistic details, story, and visual impact. Notified winning photos containing recognizable people must be able to provide a signed model release to be announced as a winner.

Ownership/Use Rights
Photographers retain the copyright to their photographs. By entering the contest, photographers agree to have their submitted photograph displayed on the Paflyfish.com website without any fee or other form of compensation, and agree that Paflyfish.com may display winning photos in a "past winners" photo gallery, and may make and retain copies of the photograph for archival purposes. Posted photos will be subject to the Paflyfish.com website photo use policy. Photos will be credited to the photographer named in the entry form. Entries (including non-winning entries) may be selected for display or use in Paflyfish.com web pages. Your entry to the contest constitutes your agreement to allow your photographs — and your name, city and state of residence — to be published as selected award winners in all materials related to the contest and to be published or used on websites owned or operated by Kile Media Group and PaFlyFish.com; and used for promotions of the website including, but not limited to, exhibitions, a photo calendar, a compilation book or electronic collection of photographs, online photo features, and web pages providing information, updates, rules and photography and fly fishing tips. Entrants retain Copyright ownership and all other rights to future use of their photographs. Paflyfish.com shall have the right to verify, in their sole judgment, winner eligibility.


I think it is pretty clear, but if you have any questions please use the forum here.
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Published by Dave Kile [dkile] on 05/24/2016 (7878 reads)
green drake I was looking through my photographs from last year and found a Green Drake snapshot, which is one of my favorites. Green Drakes (Ephemera guttulata) are one of my favorite flies to observe, too.

I say observe as I usually find myself on Penns Creek fishing while a huge Green Drake hatch is coming off and I am doing anything, but catching a lot of trout. The mixed hatches that occur during this time of year are exciting and frustrating as many angler's would agree.

So this year I am going to stop practicing the fine art of talking to myself during the hatch and I might even throw on a sulphur or a should I dare say a emerger on during the madness?

The Green Drakes can starting showing up around May 20th and are complimented by the Coffin Fly spinners which provide equal splendor during this time of year. So sit back and get ready to enjoy the show.










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