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Re: Tandem combinations
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2006/9/13 12:42
From Altoona, PA
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Quote:

Maurice wrote:
....Seriously though, if you adjust your cast with and extra long, open stroke, it minimizes the tangles.


A good cast for avoiding tangles when doing "chuck 'n duck" or "hopper/dropper" fishing is the Belgian cast
It may sound complicated, but it's pretty easy to catch on to.

Posted on: 2007/4/12 7:11
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Padraic
Never challenge a cat to a staring contest


Re: Tandem combinations

Joined:
2006/9/28 14:40
From Philadelphia
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Padraic,
Man, I read that Belgian cast site four times and still can't visulize it.
Coughlin

Posted on: 2007/4/12 7:54


Re: Tandem combinations
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2006/9/9 9:29
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It sounded to me that it was as simple as making the backcast sidearmed, then coming vertical for the forward cast. I think I have done this intuitively when casting flies that are too heavy for my setup. Isn't this a similar motion as spey casting?

Posted on: 2007/4/12 10:18
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Re: Tandem combinations

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2007/1/31 20:39
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No one has mentioned this yet, but do you ever try tandem nymph rigs? Anytime I'm nymphing I have a tandem, and it particularily helps when your prospecting a new stream. I usually have a 9-12' leader with a larger (#16 or bigger) attractor nymph at the top (stonefly, san juan, hares ear, copper john, etc) then about 1.5 ft of 5-7X tippet and a small nymph or midge. I place weight between the two fly's, and about 1' above the attractor fly. It can be tricky to cast sometimes, and you really gotta be aware of if you end up in a tangle, cause you can create a birdsnest real quick. However, tangles can be easily avoided if you keep line speed down and cast side-arm.

Joe Humphry's has a nymphing video out there where he uses a tandem scud rig, check it out if you get a chance.

Posted on: 2007/4/12 10:44


Re: Tandem combinations
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2006/9/13 12:42
From Altoona, PA
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Quote:

thedude1534 wrote:
No one has mentioned this yet, but do you ever try tandem nymph rigs? Anytime I'm nymphing I have a tandem, and it particularily helps when your prospecting a new stream. I usually have a 9-12' leader with a larger (#16 or bigger) attractor nymph at the top (stonefly, san juan, hares ear, copper john, etc) then about 1.5 ft of 5-7X tippet and a small nymph or midge. I place weight between the two fly's, and about 1' above the attractor fly. It can be tricky to cast sometimes, and you really gotta be aware of if you end up in a tangle, cause you can create a birdsnest real quick. However, tangles can be easily avoided if you keep line speed down and cast side-arm.

Joe Humphry's has a nymphing video out there where he uses a tandem scud rig, check it out if you get a chance.


Yes! Frequently!

I like to use a bright nymph like a green weenie as an underwater indicator when I am fishing quiet pools. The "dropper" can be something smaller or darker. I find the green weenie or egg pattern will "pull" trout over. They may shy away from the bright attractor, only to take the more natural fly.

I believe another poster here likes a wooleybugger/pheasant tail combo which I have not tried.

Posted on: 2007/4/12 11:07
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Padraic
Never challenge a cat to a staring contest


Re: Tandem combinations

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I hear you on the Egg patterns in slow pools. I'll usually tie on a micro-egg to use as an indicator in those situations. If I'm fishing in October-December a Y2K Egg serves at the indicator/attractor fly no matter what stream or type of water I'm in. Often times I will get more hits on that than the "dropper".

Posted on: 2007/4/12 12:19


Re: Tandem combinations

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2006/9/10 11:16
From Harrisburg PA
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I rarely fish only 1 fly. I believe more flies = more oppotunities to catch fish.

Usually I attempt to match the hatch

for example - Elk Hair caddis as main fly, from hook bend a Matthew's X-caddis emerger with the wings greased, from tag end of tippet blood knot tag end and LaFontaine Sparkle caddis with sink gel. Gives ability to match 3 stages of lifecycle. As Pad said fish the drift all the way through the swing and skip & twith the flies on occasion.

use same set-up for any hatch - adult main fly, emerger from bend, nymph from tippet blood knot tag

I believe the nypmh suspended from the tag gives the impression of a nymph struggling up the water column.

Try using an epoxy bodied ant wet as a dropper from any summer dry, beetle, hopper, cricket, humpy, floating ant or your favorite. Sunken terrestrials as droppers are great. Small pheasant tails work well as droppers during non-hatch.

In winter try a green weenie or egg in combo with any small (18-22) flashy nymph such as a lightning bug or psycho prince.

IMO, fishing 2 or 3 flies exponentially increase your fish catching. See Czech nymphing by Andy Burk.

Posted on: 2007/4/12 12:49


Re: Tandem combinations

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2007/5/11 21:03
From Media, PA
Posts: 364
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In a non-hatch situation, (most of the time for me) my best set-up is almost always a beadhead nymph trailed by an size 16-18 ant, assuming it as least mid-May or later. The ant is tied on one tippet size lighter, and I do use the bend of the heavier fly. Hook-ups are not usually an issue, because the ant will normally catch an absurd ratio of fish, even if the nymph matches the prevailing hatch of that period. Granted, the ant works best in brighter periods of the day, especially if it is breezy. If it is real early in the season, or day, I like a soft hackle dropper, 18 being average size. I'm not stuck on this set-up as the be all, end all, but have had some amazing results on hot, clear, days when most fishermen were packing it in due to lack of activity.

Posted on: 2007/6/13 17:52


Re: Tandem combinations

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2007/7/6 16:10
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here's an article I wrote on it that got published:

"Double-Up!"- by Keith P. Skilton-We’ve all learned that two flies can be better than one. To steelheaders, this means a nymph and egg fly combination separated by 24inches of fluorocarbon. To trout fisherman, this means a “hopper-dropper” rig where the flies are separated by 18 inches of a lowerdiameter of monofilament. Too many times, we are just following these “standards” and forget to ask ourselves what we are trying to achieve with the tandem rig? Most answers I hear are to determine what the fish are taking or what I call the trial and error approach.This approach may lead to learning something new for the arsenal but all to many times we just accept that trial and error is good enough which in-turn leads to losing effective fishing time. I’m a big believer in thinking through the approach so then we know the “why” and “how” and just need to apply it to the appropriate “when”. Even though conditions will always dictate the setup, I’ve learned a few tricks that’ll help the two flies interact together to improve the presentation. First, let’s look at what to do when the fish are surface feeding on very small midges. For me, it can be very difficult to identify the midge species, especially in low light conditions. In most situations, the caddis or mayfly hatch is about to begin, so what I do is use a two dry fly set-up. The first fly will be say a size 16 Goddard caddis followed by a size 22 Para-midge. As in all surface-subsurface arrangements, the Goddard pattern will act as a strike indicator but will also be taken by the opportunist feeders. I try to pick the front pattern to be larger and very buoyant. Getting the proper drift will depend on the length of separation between the two flies. Always start longer, say 30 inches, and shorten up as necessary. Secondly, let’s look at the dry fly and emerger combination. The fish are mainly feeding right below the surface with the occasional adult fly being seen taken. Fish tend to pick a spot in the water column to pick off the emerging insect and generally get the insect when it gets caught in the surface film. The trick here is to use an Indicator Parachute style first fly that rides in the surface film and place the dropper at or just above where the fish are holding. It’s a very “in your face” approach and is highly effective. The separation between the two flies can only be accurately determined by seeing where the fish is in the water column but it is generally short (6-12 inches). Experience will aid in judging distances underwater. Thirdly, lets examine the famous of all tandem rigs, the dry/nymph combination. Here the two patterns used will be of the same fly but in different stages and the water depth/flow will dictate the length of separation. Commonly, you are not able to see the fish lower in the water column; hence you’re targeting fish at or near the bottom. Its no secret to use a “hang down” technique at the end of the cast to allow the bottom fly to imitate a swimming nymph, but be cautious of when you do this. I have found its better to dead drift the rig beyond all the feeding fish, then transition to a swing and hold it. Messing with the top fly above the known fish may turn them off. Since fish have now learned to move around there will likely be fish downstream of the risers, waiting lower in the water column for their turn in the active feeding lane. The fourth combination to look at is the nymph/nymph rig. Here again we must consider how the two flies will interact together and I’ve found the most effective display will be to use a larger weighted pattern as the first fly and a smaller, more buoyant, pattern as the second. The larger pattern gets the second fly down faster and could be a better alternative than loading up the leader with split shot. Twitching the rod tip will also help the second fly rise and dive more naturally. The separation will vary but as a general rule keep them close together for fishing deep and further apart for a more searching approach.T he fifth option is the nymph/streamer combination, which is used to emulate a baitfish going after a nymph. The theory here is that bigger fish will go after the larger patterns and I’ve seen this countless times in nature where I have a smaller fish on the line and a bigger fish shows itself either by a curious follow or an outright attack. I haven’t been able to say for sure that this set-up is a sure thing. Whenever I fish for bigger fish using streamers, I only use one fly. I have heard that in lakes or slow rivers that the nymph/streamer set-up is valuable because the larger pattern will first get a fish’s attention, in turn, will then take the nymph. Again, I think this is more of a trial and error approach. Lastly, doubling up on streamers has its place but for me but it has only been in salt water applications where I was casting into large pods of blitzing baitfish. Structure, for the most part, should always be targeted when fishing streamers and losing flies is part of the program. My streamers tend to be somewhat more elaborate patterns and losing two at a time can be frustrating. Fishing two patterns at once, in theory, will always better your odds. The key is to use your knowledge of fish behavior and reading the water to make your fishing more productive. Beginners will always have the trial and error period of learning, but once experience is gained they will be able to know when the right time is to double-up. This is a dynamic approach and always requires re-evaluation of the rig. Everything is always changing underwater and to be as successful as you can, it’ll necessitate for you to change as well.This is the key to being a good fisherman.

Posted on: 2007/7/7 0:10


Re: Tandem combinations

Joined:
2007/7/5 14:49
Posts: 15
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i dont think i caught a steelhead this year with out a combo egg and a woolly bugger 12 -18 behind it well other than eggsacks

Posted on: 2007/8/3 12:13



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