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basic nymhing techniquies and info

Joined:
2007/4/28 13:21
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I've been fly fishing for 3 years now and just can't pick up the skill of nymphing or the techniquies of it and also im looking for info on techniquies well as indicators and wights and were to place them on the leader any info would be much appriceated

Posted on: 2008/10/19 0:57


Re: basic nymhing techniquies and info
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2006/9/11 8:26
From Chester County
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Attached are some links to articles on nymphing to get you started. There’s a lot of info in there, but here’s the short version to get you started:

A 9’ leader tapered to 4 or 5x should work fine. Tie on a single nymph to the end of your leader. Place a Styrofoam strike indicator above the fly at 11/2 – 2 times the depth of the water. Make a cast quartering upstream. Keep as much line off the water as you can, and keep slack out of your line by raising you rod and following your line downstream. If the line begins to drift above or below the indicator and starts to drag it, flip the line in the opposite direction it is dragging to allow it to float naturally, this is called “mending”. If the fly does not reach the bottom after a couple of drifts, add a small split shot 6-8 inches above the fly. If the indicator stops or moves in any way, tighten up your line. It could be the bottom or it could be a fish. Cover all the water in front of you, move a few steps up or downstream and cast again. Move your indicator up or down if the depth of the water changes as you move, and add or remove split shot to and keep the fly near the bottom. If you don’t drag your fly and you keep your nymph close to the bottom – good things should happen. Good luck.


http://www.flyanglersonline.com/begin/101/part31.php

http://www.flyanglersonline.com/begin/101/part45.php

http://www.flyfishinggear.info/how_to/nymph_fishing.shtm

Posted on: 2008/10/19 8:44


Re: basic nymhing techniquies and info

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2008/5/11 9:50
From Lancaster
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EA88, where are you located. I'm in lancaster. I'd be glad to wet a line with ya and help you with the basics. I'm no expert but I fish nymphs more than any other method and am usually successfull.

Posted on: 2008/10/19 14:48


Re: basic nymhing techniquies and info

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thanks but i live near pittsburgh

Posted on: 2008/10/19 21:23


Re: basic nymhing techniquies and info

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2008/3/20 22:15
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Everyone has their own method and learning style but hat did it for me was a 3 colored line indicator between the leader and tippet. I don't use any other indicator. Use the same method that Afishinado mentioned but watch your line indicator. What I like about not using any other indicator is that this visable piece of colored thread will show you depth, hits that most won't show and it does not distract you by staring at a dot. (I get mesmerised) Cast upstream, hard to sink your nymph. Not a typical dry fishing cast. When I started out I just casted upstream let it drift by and at the end of the drift I set like I'm hooking up on a big one. Then I immediately send my nymph forward and down. (If that makes any sense). Not pretty but the goal is to effectively slap that nymph hard and deep. (Not something to practice and catch fish in wild trout waters) Then while not having any extra slack(You'll slowly figure this out by not dropping your arm after the cast) you follow the line indicator hopefully trying to keep it looking tight while allowing it to feel the bottom. You'll feel it catch on rocks and such but what you want is to keep it moving without slack, Arm extended to prevent any drag other than the current. To feel current pull and rocks grabbing your hook is a good thing. At the end of every drift not too far past the swing you set again (fish or not) to load your line to be able to send it forward and sink the nymph deep again. Repeat many times. It took me way too long but I am a real slow study.

I am always an advocate of a lesson it will totally help with the learning curve. As with anything instructors as well as students they can differ but a match can be a match worth paying for.

Posted on: 2008/10/24 19:41


Re: basic nymhing techniquies and info

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2006/9/12 0:23
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if you want to get together some time, i'll be happy to take you to volant and show you some techniques.

Posted on: 2008/10/24 22:16


Re: basic nymhing techniquies and info

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2008/11/4 15:20
From Upper Saucon, PA
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It took me a bit of time to learn how to nymph fish. What I found is that I picked up the art of fishing with dries rather fast and can hold my own on most streams. But nymph fishing always seemed to be one of those, darn how the heck do you do this. Then I realized it was more lack of confidence than anything else. Now I can nymph under a dry, or an actual indicator, or by itself weighted or unweighted. For me, the more I simply entered the stream put on a nymph and caught a fish without thinking too much about it, the easier it became. Books are good methods of learning just as fishing with someone who nymph fishes well, but simply trying to nymph more and more times to build confidence can get you from point a to z. Go one step further, and tie a few nymphs on your own, then go catch a trout on one of them, thats a real confidence builder. One final note, no matter how good or not so good you may think you are, remember that spending time wading in a trout stream with a fly rod in your hand is something that simply can not be beat.

Posted on: 2009/1/19 22:33
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Re: basic nymhing techniquies and info

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2008/1/21 13:28
From South Central PA
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I am no no expert, but perhaps this will help:

I have heard from a few people that they just did not see how the fish could ignore split shot and still take a nymph. They really do, and often, and with greater confidence than a dry fly in many instances. Perhaps on ultra pressured streams would be an exception, but even there you can use weighted nymphs and longer leaders. So confidence to stay with it is important.

You absolutely never cast a weighted nymph rig (i.e. with split shot on the leader) like you do a dry fly. It is a good way to zing yourself in the back of the head. Roll casting is not possible, either.

You may want to expand the variety of nymphs you use, and also use smaller sizes, i.e., # 16 and smaller in many instances, unless the water is running high and/or murky.

A great learning tool is the dvd A Casting Approach to Nymphing Tactics, by Joe Humphreys.

Of course, an onstream lesson would be great as well.

Posted on: 2009/1/21 12:50


Re: basic nymhing techniquies and info

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2008/12/8 7:15
From Berks/Chester Co
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Quote:

DGC wrote:
You absolutely never cast a weighted nymph rig (i.e. with split shot on the leader) like you do a dry fly. It is a good way to zing yourself in the back of the head. Roll casting is not possible, either.


I am no expert either but I don't think the above statement is true. I do both and especially roll casting...how else would I get the nymph into the proper position?

Posted on: 2009/1/21 13:31
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Re: basic nymhing techniquies and info

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2008/12/29 13:34
From Lehigh Valley
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I rollcast weighted nymphs too. Its not as easy of course, but sometimes its the only option given the surrounding trees, bushes, etc

Posted on: 2009/1/21 13:36


Re: basic nymhing techniquies and info

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2007/1/2 11:55
From Bozeman
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Yeah, I fish em normally. I just open the loop and slow the stroke down and it works fine.

Posted on: 2009/1/21 13:38


Re: basic nymhing techniquies and info
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Posted on: 2009/1/21 13:45
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Re: basic nymhing techniquies and info

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2008/11/4 15:20
From Upper Saucon, PA
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I agree with the gents who mentioned they cast in a normal manner using weighted nymphs.

When I hit the Lake Erie tributaries and we shift to fly fishing with nymphs rather than an egg, we always use split shot. sometimes one, more times than not three or even four if I am in fast water.

I do not change anything in regard to style during those times. I roll cast and use my dry fly techniques just as if I were unweighted back here in the Lehigh Valley.

Of course reality it to each their own. Many of us learned particular techniques so it is what we use. I doubt any of us are right or wrong, we just use what we learned and what works for us.

Posted on: 2009/2/1 15:30
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Re: basic nymhing techniquies and info

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2008/3/20 22:15
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You can roll cast a nymph. If you add weight you can still sink your nymph using a standard cast. What you can't do with a typical cast is keep up with your slack as quickly. You will miss more fish that you never knew you had. A roll cast works as well but you need to be adept at keeping up with the drift without losing that fine connection. I do not use indicators anymore. I do not use split shot which would explain part of my technique that differs from yours. I do use weighted nymphs but they are not going to sink the same as a nymph with a bunch of split shot. I smack them down hard to get them to the bottom. Most times I get a hit early on and have sucess when I'm following the drift without dragging it. You seem to have a good place to start. It doesn't matter how you learn what but that you are open to learn more. The day I slapped a nymph into a plunge pool and immediately hooked up, first hit, first cast, I realized I had taken one more baby step forward. One of many.

Posted on: 2009/2/1 17:17


Re: basic nymhing techniquies and info

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2008/1/31 17:19
From Pretty much everywhere at some point, Thorndale today.
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I wish I was a better nympher than I am, but I'm getting there. These are my $.02, feel free to take or ignore whatever I say.

There are many ways to cast. You can cast just like a dry fly, and you can roll cast, and in certain situations those will work. I end up doing a lot of role casting actually. I found that most commonly I'm doing (or trying to do) a tuck cast, it just gets the nymph to the bottom more quickly. This is especially needed in fast, deep runs, because otherwise you're drift is pretty much over before the nymph even gets deep enough. Basically, the goal on this cast is to get your nymph to enter the water vertically and with power. I basically aim for a point 3 feet or so above the water and beyond the target, the cast straightens out in mid-air, and you stop it in mid-air, the nymph just dives and enters the water first.

A few pointers, try what you want to:

1. The closer the shot to the nymph the deeper it will go.
2. If you're not snagging up at least occasionally, you're not fishing deep enough. Add shot, move it closer to the nymph, change casts, but at least change something! A good nympher is constantly adjusting weight, leader, cast, etc. I like using weighted nymphs personally, its easier to change to a heavier or lighter fly than it is to change shot, at least for me.
3. A classic tapered leader is not necessary for most nymphing, most of the time it works against you. I go straight from my butt section to a long piece of 2x or 3x tippet, and follow it with 4x or 5x. Its very common for me to have 1 foot of butt, 7 feet of thick tippet, and maybe 1-2 feet of finer tippet. You need to open your cast, which means this is best on bigger water. But it lowers the resistance of your leader to the current, and you get a better drift with better sensitivity.
4. I've found I do better without indicators. There are exceptions, if distance casting is necessary an indicator helps, and those long slow pools of relatively constant depth.
5. When the trout fishing is slow, suckers are excellent practice.
6. 2 nymph rigs do work, but I don't recommend them until you start to do well with 1 nymph. They can just lead to tangles and frustration. If and when you decide to add a second nymph, I like the dropper method. The dropper line should be short (less than 4 inches) and a larger size (or at least stiffer material) than the line its attached to.
7. As a searching pattern between hatches, nothing beats a nymph below a dry.
8. During a hatch with rising fish, don't be afraid to fish an unweighted nymph near the surface, you might be shocked at the results.

Posted on: 2009/2/2 8:05



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