Register now on PaFlyFish.com! Login
HOME FORUM BLOG PHOTOS LINKS


Sponsors

Browsing this Thread:   1 Anonymous Users



(1) 2 »


Early Stone Fly Patterns

Joined:
2006/9/28 14:40
From Philadelphia
Posts: 368
Offline
Anyone care to offer a favorite early black stonefly pattern.
Coughlin

Posted on: 2006/11/18 10:37


Re: Early Stone Fly Patterns

Joined:
2006/9/10 21:53
From Greensburg, PA
Posts: 13623
Offline
We had this duscussion last march I think, but since the old board is gone...I googled this. There are simpler variations but this one looks good.

http://hipwader.com/2004/early-black-stonefly-nymph

Posted on: 2006/11/18 12:57


Re: Early Stone Fly Patterns

Joined:
2006/9/28 14:40
From Philadelphia
Posts: 368
Offline
Thanks, Gambler. Thats a good looking pattern. Guess I missed last March's discussion. Actually, I can find lots of patterns around, just wondering what the favorite might be for any of you and now that I think of it, how you usually fish it. I've never paid much attention to stoneflys before but have been doing a bit of research and would like to give them a try.
Coughlin

Posted on: 2006/11/18 17:39


Re: Early Stone Fly Patterns

Joined:
2006/9/10 21:53
From Greensburg, PA
Posts: 13623
Offline
Down and dead is where I've have my best results. They are especially effective in the winter as they are a big bite for a hungry, cold trout. The only difference between that pattern and what I might tie, (depending on how lazy I am at the moment) sometimes my abdomen is only larva lace and if I'm tying black I tie black...this looks kinda brown but...

Posted on: 2006/11/18 19:44


Re: Early Stone Fly Patterns

Joined:
2006/9/28 14:40
From Philadelphia
Posts: 368
Offline
Gambler,
Thanks again. Haven't done a whole lot by way of winter fishing in the past ( and probably won't do a heck f a lot this year either ) but stoneflys sounded like a good alternative to my usual assortment of woolybuggers. They also looked like a neat fly to tie up, though my first attempts have been lumpier than I like. The patterns using larva lace look interesting, so I think I'll give that a try as well as the more impressionistic versions.
Coughlin

Posted on: 2006/11/19 6:52


Re: Early Stone Fly Patterns

Joined:
2006/9/10 21:53
From Greensburg, PA
Posts: 13623
Offline
I love larva lace for a lot of things. The hard part is trying to actually find the stuff that is round and hollow. Theres penty of stuff like Schwunandaze (sp) thats flat and i don't like that as much. I've used the round stuff for anything from ribbing, to abdomen on nymphs to caddis larva (now there's an easy and effective tie) . I just like the fullness rather than the flat.

Posted on: 2006/11/19 11:03


Re: Early Stone Fly Patterns

Joined:
2006/9/9 9:38
From W Pa
Posts: 30
Offline
I love larva lace for a lot of things. The hard part is trying to actually find the stuff that is round and hollow.

Here you go Tomgamber.
Stalcup's Tubing: Hollow narrow tubes you can use for bodies. Sizes: Midge or Standard: Colors: Black, Blood Red, Clear, Olive, Orange, Peacock, Yellow, Pheas-Tail, Tan. $1.75

You can but it here--http://www.eflytyer.com/order_info/oi_synthetics.html

Hope this helps.

JaD

Posted on: 2006/11/19 13:25
_________________
Take a hard look at yourself, Might change the way you look at other people.


Re: Early Stone Fly Patterns

Joined:
2006/9/10 21:53
From Greensburg, PA
Posts: 13623
Offline
You can fin anything (and I usually do) on the internet. When I need somethig now, waiting a weeek to get it doesn't help. I've even found varigated chenille (the one thing I can never find) on the net. All of the local places I know of don't sell either.

Posted on: 2006/11/19 15:31


Re: Early Stone Fly Patterns

Joined:
2006/9/28 14:40
From Philadelphia
Posts: 368
Offline
Saw an ad for V-rib at Hille. I suspect that's flat rather than the oval. Yes?
Coughlin

Posted on: 2006/11/19 20:07


Re: Early Stone Fly Patterns
Moderator
Joined:
2006/9/11 8:26
From Chester County
Posts: 8869
Offline
While perusing a craft store (AC Moore I believe), I found some coated copper wire. It comes in small and progressively larger diameters. Also, its made in different colors – black, copper, gray, olive. I got the idea to use it for stonefly ties as well as brassies, copper johns, and ribbing on various flies. It works great and has the added bonus of adding weight to the fly and a little glow. I usually taper the underbody and wind the wire over the abdomen of the stonefly.

One other trick when using larva lace, is to wrap the underbody with tinsel, crystal flash, or anything shiny or metallic. The translucent larva lace in the lighter colors takes on a glow that trout seem to be very found of.

Coughlin – the tiny winter black stoneflies are very slender and are size #16 nymph hook or even smaller. Larva lace would be too bulky for them. You may want to use sparse black dubbing with a black or silver wire rib, or an all black wire abdomen when tying these flies.

Posted on: 2006/11/20 9:23


Re: Early Stone Fly Patterns

Joined:
2006/9/11 13:05
From Lewistown
Posts: 3593
Offline
I agree with afishinado. Those early black stones are really small. The ones where I live are about size 14 and are really skinny. I would by a 25 pack of 2X long size 14 or 16 hooks to tie a more realistic imitation. However, in the midst of Winter, A big meal will potentially get a fish to move (finishing with a violent strike). Where a small fly will have to be presented practically in fronth of the fish's nose (taken with just a sip).

Posted on: 2006/11/20 11:22
_________________
><(Mkern{( ‘ >


Re: Early Stone Fly Patterns

Joined:
2006/9/28 14:40
From Philadelphia
Posts: 368
Offline
Mike & Afishinado,
Thanks for the advice. I have no experience with these flies (oddly enough), though I do fish a Brooks Stone fly imitation later in the season. So for the early black it sounds like 14 standard or 16 2x long. I'm not really a big fan of realistic patterns, but the stone fly seems sort of a neat insect to try and get closer to form.

Anyway, this has been helpful. Thanks.
Coughlin

Posted on: 2006/11/20 18:15


Re: Early Stone Fly Patterns

Joined:
2006/11/17 21:37
From Red Hill, Montgomery County, Pa
Posts: 42
Offline
I printed out an Early Black Stone Fly pattern probably a year ago or maybe more from the old board that was submitted by Chaz. Never got to tie it, but was thinking about it this fall. It is a very thin fly with a sparse deer hair wing...size 18 dry. There is also a pattern in the fly tying, fly swap 2004 thread on this site...Tied by Brad Birely. I have a question related to this, if you would indulge me. In the Lehigh Valley and surrounding area, when should we start to see these flies or fish them?
Thanks in advance for any advice.
Schiff

Posted on: 2006/11/22 19:14


Re: Early Stone Fly Patterns
Moderator
Joined:
2006/9/9 19:16
From Dallastown, PA
Posts: 6985
Offline
This is one of my favorite hatches...or at least it used to be. First let me say that the Early black and brown stones are #16-#20. #14 is on the lanky side. Although I've seen some larger, it will serve you well to not put all your eggs in one basket and stick with #16 & #18 My pattern is like this...

Dry fly hook #16 -#18. Black Body. white or gray poly wing, spent down wing style (over the body a little past the bend of the hook) and a Gray or grizzley hackle (4-5 turns at least.)

This fly is best used when the flies are coming back to lay their eggs where they hit the crik and skitter along the surface. Because the hatch itself consists of the nymphs moving to the shallows and climbing onto rocks to molt into adults, the nymph is not a big player in the fishing aspect of the LBS pattern. But I do tie a biot stone for use as a dropper when I am feeling under confident. It also acts as a balast when skittering and sometimes the trout cannot resist the nymph.

Another popular nymph is the Gallagher stone which is nothing more than a black body, no tail, a silver rib, and a soft hackle.

To answer the other question, you should begin to see them over the next month through early april (I saw a #18 today) with their concentration being during the sunny warm days even when the snow is on the ground. (in Feb & March) It seems the sun and warming of water triggers the hatch.

Good Luck,

Maurice

Posted on: 2006/11/22 19:40
_________________
Don't hit me with them negative waves so early in the morning. Think the bridge will be there and it will be there. It's a mother, beautiful bridge, and it's gonna be there. Ok?


Re: Early Stone Fly Patterns

Joined:
2006/11/17 21:37
From Red Hill, Montgomery County, Pa
Posts: 42
Offline
Maurice, great info...thanks much. Thanks also to the rest of you guys for expanding this Stone Fly thread, just when I happened to be thinking about them. Timing is everything.

Posted on: 2006/11/22 21:29



(1) 2 »



You can view topic.
You cannot start a new topic.
You cannot reply to posts.
You cannot edit your posts.
You cannot delete your posts.
You cannot add new polls.
You cannot vote in polls.
You cannot attach files to posts.
You cannot post without approval.

[Advanced Search]





Site Content
Login
Username:

Password:

Remember me



Lost Password?

Register now!
Stay Connected

twitterfeed.com facebook instagram RSS Feed

Sponsors
Polls





Copyright 2014 by PaFlyFish.com | Privacy Policy| Provided by Kile Media Group | Design by 7dana.com