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Beginning and Indicators...

Joined:
2010/4/15 17:24
From Central Maryland
Posts: 238
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So I've been going out frequently over the course of the past couple weeks. My casting is pretty good. My presentation is good at some times, not so good at others. However, I'm only catching chubs. I'm new to the whole moving water fishing thing so I mistook my first chub as a very drab rainbow, since I caught it and released it very quick. Since then I've caught a bunch of these guys, some pretty big, and some pretty small, but no trout. I caught my biggest chub ever this evening on a bead head hare's ear with some red flash. I know there are trout in the waters I'm fishing, so what's the problem? Are trout just harder to catch so I'm just not good enough yet?

Also, when I bought all of my fly fishing stuff, I didn't get any indicators. I tried using a dry fly dropper rig but didn't do well, so I'm gonna need some indicators I think. I know this is a very opinionated question, but I'll take opinions at this point. Colors? Types? Sizes? I'd also like to be schooled a little bit on beginner's technique with indicator nymphing. Should I always use a beadhead nymph for the weight?

Posted on: 2010/5/30 22:10


Re: Beginning and Indicators...

Joined:
2010/5/13 23:48
From Altoona
Posts: 331
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I'm pretty new to nymphs too, but I have used two type of indicators. The first is Fish Pimp indicators. Football shaped, foam. The dead drift setup explained on the package required you to put the indicator on first. If you forgot to do it, you'd have to start over. They were a pain, but what did I know? Then Sight_nymph introduced me to Thingamabob indicators. I don't have much experience with them, but they worked much better for me. Floated higher, and easily moved up and down your leader. And once you put them on, they stay on. I suggest them. For slower moving water, get smaller indicators, since they'll be more sensitive to takes. Faster water, bigger indicators. As far as color, I think it's just personal preference.

This is just my two cents, but I hope it helps. I'll let the beadhead question up to the more experienced anglers.

Posted on: 2010/5/30 22:34


Re: Beginning and Indicators...

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2008/12/16 10:37
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My short answer for you is thingamabobbers in the smallest size. I've tried a few different types and although I grew fond of the foam inline indicators they just are not durable and I go through at least 1 an outing.


I'm still using my original thingamabob for several weeks now they show you every tick on the bottom if set right, are highly visible and COST EFFECTIVE.

Posted on: 2010/5/30 22:40
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Re: Beginning and Indicators...

Joined:
2010/4/15 17:24
From Central Maryland
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I was looking at thingamabobbers online and was considering them. I'll probably pick up a pack of those ASAP. Now any thoughts on why I can only catch chubs?

Posted on: 2010/5/30 22:41


Re: Beginning and Indicators...
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Joined:
2006/9/9 17:32
From Gettysburg
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Pontus,
Yes, trout are more difficult to catch than chubs (not to mention less numerous). Are you sure you're fishing good trout water? Some streams, particularly those managed under "put and take" regulations, often have very few fish by this time of year as they're caught and kept by fishermen or simply die off or disappear due to warm water temps. As a general rule, trout tend to get tougher to catch as summer rolls around due to the aforementioned warm water temps plus the streams tend to be lower and clearer. Streams such as Big Hunting Creek have trout year round but can be very tough to fish by summer time due to low water. Have you tried for fish other than trout (besides those darn chubs)? While you may prefer to fish for trout - and that's understandable as fly fishing is mainly associated with the glamour of trout fishing - you might consider fishing for sunfish or bass. They bite well in warm weather and are great fun to catch, not to mention being more forgiving than trout.

Posted on: 2010/5/30 22:50


Re: Beginning and Indicators...

Joined:
2010/4/15 17:24
From Central Maryland
Posts: 238
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Yeah I've gone out to the pond twice to catch bluegill and bass on pretty much every cast. And yeah, I've been fishing the catch and release section of the Patuxent which gets stocked with browns and rainbows and has natural reproduction of browns. I just heard today that Big Hunting Creek is fishing really well right now so I might head up there soon while the flows are still good.

Posted on: 2010/5/30 22:58


Re: Beginning and Indicators...

Joined:
2010/5/13 23:48
From Altoona
Posts: 331
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Also, your trout troubles can be related to the time you fish. At times, they're more forgiving. Other times, it's more frustrating than... Well, it's pretty darn frustrating. If the trout are just holding out and taking little "snacks", you really have to pinpoint your casts. you have to figure out by experimentation and hitting the water where the trout lay at different times of the day. I read somewhere online that if the energy exerted in finding food is greater than the energy gained from the food, the trout don't bother. I don't know how reliable that is, but I really took it to heart. You have to try to get your fly/nymph to the trout, not the other way around.

Posted on: 2010/5/30 23:20


Re: Beginning and Indicators...

Joined:
2010/4/15 17:24
From Central Maryland
Posts: 238
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I've been fishing from whenever I can get on the stream until around dark. I still think I'm missing a lot of strikes when I go subsurface. I've hooked two fish so far just picking up to cast.

Posted on: 2010/5/30 23:23


Re: Beginning and Indicators...

Joined:
2010/5/13 23:48
From Altoona
Posts: 331
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indicators will really help then. Pick some up asap.

Posted on: 2010/5/30 23:24


Re: Beginning and Indicators...

Joined:
2010/4/15 17:24
From Central Maryland
Posts: 238
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Ok and any comments on flies for indicator fishing? I have a pack of split shot with 4 different sizes and I have an array of nymphs with and without beads, but when I nymph I tend to just put the bead head on because it's easier.

Posted on: 2010/5/30 23:49


Re: Beginning and Indicators...

Joined:
2010/5/13 23:48
From Altoona
Posts: 331
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like i said, im pretty new to nymphing also. i've been shown two ways. one was this setup:

-Two nymphs, heaviest one first, then the other off the hook of the first. 18 inches seems to be the norm.
-then, depending on the speed of the water, split shot eight inches above the first nymph. tie a knot in your line so the splitshot doesn't slide down. And if needed, add more weight up the line 4 inches at a time until the desired weight is acquired.
-last step, indicator 1-1.5x the water depth up the line from the last splitshot.

as far as this setup goes, you want it hitting bottom. You can feel it. If you're getting hung up too much, take weight off. If you don't feel it hitting, add more weight. It's a bit of trial and error.

the second setup is much simpler: just your desired nymph(s) and an indicator 1-1.5x water depth above the nymphs. This one doesn't get hung up as much. Either setup works. It's your personal preference.

Yes, the beadheads are easier, but I think to be more productive you should use nymphs that are more specific to the hatches going on in the water. If it's hatching, the nymphs are in the water. Just look up the hatch chart or ask people fishing the same area/waters. or again, trial and error.
And the beadheads do get the nymph down to the bottom faster, but I don't think it's that noticeable. Especially if you're adding splitshots to your line anyway.

Posted on: 2010/5/31 0:08


Re: Beginning and Indicators...

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2009/9/24 15:02
From Montgomery County
Posts: 1585
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You want a nymph to tick off the bottom as it drifts along. I tend to use more shot and a bigger indicator to get my flies in the zone faster and keep them there longer. You'll tend to get hung up quite a bit fishing this style, but it catches fish that aren't often actively feeding. On a stream with lots of bug activity and feeding fish, a simple bead head might be plenty to get your fly into the zone. If you're fishing over skittish trout, a smaller indicator (white) or a dry dropper can make all the difference

Posted on: 2010/5/31 0:16


Re: Beginning and Indicators...

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2006/9/9 11:22
From New Castle, PA
Posts: 1572
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You may be fishing in areas that are too shallow or do not have any cover that attracts trout. I find that chubs, shiners, etc. are a lot more common in such areas. Trout will move into these areas when actively feeding, but usually don't hang around them all the time. Focus your efforts on areas where you can't see the bottom clearly and there is some current.

Also, make sure you are getting down deep enough as others have mentioned.

Kev

Posted on: 2010/5/31 10:11


Re: Beginning and Indicators...

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2007/3/26 22:22
Posts: 1348
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Corey,

Stick on one of those mini thingamabobbers with a tungsten bead stone and two march browns... you'll wish you had the one that looks like a ping pong ball. lmao. They are bery good though. Love em.

Posted on: 2010/5/31 16:49


Re: Beginning and Indicators...

Joined:
2006/12/29 10:00
From Harrisburg
Posts: 2008
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Time after time I've witnessed trout take a fly and spit it without the indicator budging. I'll use them in colored water conditions anymore and thats about it. If you can see the fish, watch them and their reactions as your indicator approaches them and look for the white of their mouth to open or maybe a turn of the head, whatever. Use your perriphrial? vision on the indictor for a strike from a trout unseen. I dont recommend watching it like a bobber if possible.

Posted on: 2010/6/2 10:50
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