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Re: Beginning and Indicators...

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2008/3/20 22:15
Posts: 1789
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Sometimes you get what you get. Doesn't sound like you're doing anything wrong. I've fished around home where I feel bad when I set on a chub when I think it's a trout and send it into the trees. OK! I get excited! Just a bit!

Depending on where you fish you might catch more chubs than trout so use it as an advantage rather than a disappointment. As far as indicators,I still use my 3 colored backing inline indicator, unless I switch to a dry dropper or otherwise. There really isn't anything you can do about chubs. Set hard, loft high?

Posted on: 2010/6/3 0:18


Re: Beginning and Indicators...

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2008/2/18 10:20
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Quote:

Pontus wrote:
I've been fishing from whenever I can get on the stream until around dark. I still think I'm missing a lot of strikes when I go subsurface. I've hooked two fish so far just picking up to cast.


That happens. I think that sometimes the fish think it's a bug emerging and they slam it cause they think it's getting away.

Also, what does your rig look like? Is the indicator 2X the depth of the water? What length leader are you using?

Posted on: 2010/6/3 1:20
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Re: Beginning and Indicators...

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2010/4/15 17:24
From Central Maryland
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The streams I fish are small (10-30' wide). I have an 8' 4wt with a 7.5 foot leader tapered to 4x that by now is probably more like 7' from tying on tippets. Tippets range in length and diameter for different occasions. I also haven't used an indicator yet. I bought thingamabobbers a few days ago, but I have football practice all this week. I also went bluegill fishing yesterday with a friend to help him get started with fishing.

Posted on: 2010/6/3 13:13


Re: Beginning and Indicators...

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I'll probably get beat up for this, but there seems to be 2 basic ideas about indicators. A floating indicator..I call them bobbers in disguise..like a dry dropper setup or an inline indicator where you watch for a stop in the motion of your line. If your fishing subsurface..nymph fishing..you can use either method but for starting out I'd stick with an in line indicator. Like I mentioned you can use colored backing between your leader and tippet. If you keep contact which you can see by watching the slack in the backing. Forward bend good, straight better, backward bend bad..you need to catch up. All you need to do after that is watch for your line to pause or stop. Either your nymph is stuck on the bottom or you just had a take. Either way set! After that you can either keep with it or graduate to a curly or some other inline. The floating indicator is great but I'd save that for after you've mastered the inline. Floating indicators that are used in dry dropper rigs and are highly effective. I'd just master the inline and graduate to that. Some may say start off that way but I think the inline teaches you about how to follow the current better so when you switch to the dry dropper you've got your connection down.

Posted on: 2010/6/3 21:29


Re: Beginning and Indicators...

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2007/1/2 11:55
From Bozeman
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I'm a big fan of inlines like wetnet mentioned.

I prefer to use amnesia, just because it's more durable and easier to work with IMO.

Posted on: 2010/6/4 10:56


Re: Beginning and Indicators...
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2006/9/13 12:42
From Altoona, PA
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Quote:

wetnet wrote:
I'll probably get beat up for this, but there seems to be 2 basic ideas about indicators.


I won't beat you up for it.

To build on what you said though...

I like the "In line" setup when nymphing fast water with an uneven bottom. My favorite in line setup was two bits of strike putty put onto knots in my leader. I'd watch the two dots of putty, when the bottom one ticked upstream, it was probably a trout taking the nymph. The benefit of the inline is that you can react to the changes in depth and current in pocket water. It works well with traditional high stick nymphing techniques.

Floats or dry flies as an indicator are great when you are fishing a pool. In that situation, you have to fish from a little further off or risk scaring the fish. Also, the bottom of a pool is usually more even than pocket water. So having a rig that keeps the nymph at a constant depth is not a problem. In fact, it's a benefit.

Posted on: 2010/6/4 11:33
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Padraic
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Re: Beginning and Indicators...
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2006/9/11 8:26
From Chester County
Posts: 8618
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Quote:

Padraic wrote:
Quote:

wetnet wrote:
I'll probably get beat up for this, but there seems to be 2 basic ideas about indicators.


I won't beat you up for it.

To build on what you said though...

I like the "In line" setup when nymphing fast water with an uneven bottom. My favorite in line setup was two bits of strike putty put onto knots in my leader. I'd watch the two dots of putty, when the bottom one ticked upstream, it was probably a trout taking the nymph. The benefit of the inline is that you can react to the changes in depth and current in pocket water. It works well with traditional high stick nymphing techniques.

Floats or dry flies as an indicator are great when you are fishing a pool. In that situation, you have to fish from a little further off or risk scaring the fish. Also, the bottom of a pool is usually more even than pocket water. So having a rig that keeps the nymph at a constant depth is not a problem. In fact, it's a benefit.


I agree completely. A little strike putty for visibilty works well, or you can tie on a "sighter" made of highly visible line. With this set-up you can fish a all depths by controlling your casts (dumping slack or not) or by casting further upstream to allow your flies to sink deeper. It makes it very easy to hug the bottom where there are many depth changes right in front of you in the stream. No need to adjust anything.

As Pad mentioned floating indies work on slow even-bottomed pools, also I would like to add that they work well for nymphing across different current speeds and for long distances where you can mend to the indy to get a good drift.

Back to the original question though. As a beginner, I recommend that you use a floating indy and concentrate on getting a drag-free drift (like you are fishing a dry fly). When you master that, you can begin line watching.

Posted on: 2010/6/4 12:01


Re: Beginning and Indicators...

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2008/3/20 22:15
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Whew! I thought the bobber comment would get me. Everyone seems to built onto what I said so you've got a wonderful bunch of options to find out what works for you. That's what counts, isn't it? So about bobber options, my experience is limited to a large dry, like in a dry dropper. Maybe the crew here can add some dimension to that as well. I can't help you much there.

I don't necessarily agree about floating verses in-line and which one first but I'm going to think on that one. I think I may be in agreement about the non-drift. It was just easier for me..no it was hard to learn the inline, I looked like a druken sailor, my rod weaving too far back then too far ahead. Heck something else to try out to keep me addicted.

Posted on: 2010/6/4 18:55


Re: Beginning and Indicators...
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2006/9/13 12:42
From Altoona, PA
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You know, another good exercise for learning nymphing is to tye on a really bright fly like a green weenie or a glo bug. Drift that through a run of really clear water and you'll see how a nymph moves through the water.

For that matter, a nymph or glo bug is another good indicator. Tye one on, then put a foot or so of tippet on the bend. To that, tye on a pheasant tail or hare's ear. Very often, trout will be attracted to the bright fly and take the more realistic one.

Posted on: 2010/6/4 20:39
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Padraic
Never challenge a cat to a staring contest



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