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Re: Snakehead update: The Giving Pond, DCNR lake, upper Bucks Co

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2011/5/9 15:37
From Ohio
Posts: 115
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Quote:

JerryC wrote:
So if you catch a snakehead kill it and throw it in the bushes for a raccoon

Quote:

poopdeck wrote:
Dispose of it properly also encompasses throwing it on the bank for the raccoons.


It's illegal to throw fish in the bushes or on the bank. Officers can and will ticket you for it. They definitely do in western PA where bowfin getting thrown on the bank is an issue(more on this below).

"(g) It is unlawful to discard any fish carcass or parts thereof into the waters of this Commonwealth or upon any public or private lands contiguous to the waters unless one of the following conditions apply:

(1) On lands with the permission of the landowner.

(2) Where fish are properly disposed into suitable garbage or refuse collection systems or at officially recognized fish cleaning stations."

https://www.pacode.com/secure/data/058/chapter63/s63.15.html

Quote:

Fredrick wrote:
Well if you can't transport the fish to another body of water or alive what is your other option ?


Killing it, then putting it on a stringer or in a cooler to take home would be two other options, no?

Quote:

moon1284 wrote:
I wonder how many bowfin are being killed because people can't differentiate them from a snakehead.


Likely a bunch, unfortunately. This is a problem in the western part of the state, and in other states......even where snakeheads do not exist. Sure, some people confuse them with snakeheads, but most get killed because they think bowfin are just as bad for our waters. And other people view them as a nuisance fish(which is makes absolutely zero sense, but that's another topic...).

Posted on: 11/9 19:12


Re: Snakehead update: The Giving Pond, DCNR lake, upper Bucks Co

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2011/5/9 15:37
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It's been touched on in some of the previous posts, but here's a list of some of the non-native fish in the Delaware system:

brown trout
rainbow trout
smallmouth bass
laregemouth bass
walleye
channel catfish
flathead catfish
rock bass
bluegill
crappie
northern pike
musky
northern snakehead
...and others

http://www.fishandboat.com/Fish/Penns ... 2-SpeciesbyWatersheds.pdf

I realize that snakeheads are a new introduction, but if it has gotten to the point where it is impossible to control their population, then why have a "kill em all" attitude towards them and not any of those other non-native fish??

Now if it hasn't gotten to that point, and it's still realistic to control their pop, then yeah, let's do whatever we can.

Posted on: 11/9 19:22


Re: Snakehead update: The Giving Pond, DCNR lake, upper Bucks Co

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2013/12/7 0:10
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Quote:

moon1284 wrote:
Alewifes, Zebra mussels, and gobies were going to destroy the great lakes. Now there are worries the alewife population is not large enough to support the Pacific salmon that were introduced in the 60s to control the alewife. After the invasion of zebra mussels, the lakes became much more clear and no fish population plummeted. Gobies were going to be another problem, now bass fisherman use lures to imitate gobies.

Meanwhile, atlantic salmon and blue pike were extripated from lake Ontario before any invasive species were introduced (due to dams and pollution respectively). Killing snakehead is going to do next to nothing to control the population, but if it feels good to throw them on the shore then by all means do it. Just make sure you don't throw any carp on shore, they are now a revered game fish...

I wonder how many bowfin are being killed because people can't differentiate them from a snakehead.



Actually they are crediting the aggressive killing of the snakeheads with keeping them in somewhat check. Despite this aggressive removal of the snakeheads they are still here and as previously stated, they are here to stay. They are not going anywhere but if left unchecked other species may. It's really that simple.

While zebra mussels have made the Great Lakes water clarity clearer they have "unleashed ecological havoc" and are "sucking the life out of Lake Michigan and lake huron" according to the experts. That doesn't sound like a plus to me.

Posted on: 11/9 21:44


Re: Snakehead update: The Giving Pond, DCNR lake, upper Bucks Co
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Some fish are "introduced" species into a waterway, which means purposely stocked to enhance fishing or serve some biological function in the ecosystem; while other species are said to be "invasive" because they were introduced illegally or by accident, and are believed to be harmful to the ecosystem.

No one truly knows the impact of snakeheads in our waterways. First because they haven't been here that long, and second because each river, stream and lake are different and their impact on each may vary.

I agree, Snakeheads are here to stay and only time will tell whether they have an impact on certain streams, rivers or lakes. They have no real natural predators....except us, so the choice to kill or release is up to you.

Like I posted above, snakeheads can breath air and "walk" on land so throwing them on the bank is not a good idea for those reasons as well as being looked upon as illegal dumping or littering.

http://www.wideopenspaces.com/invasiv ... e-fare-snakehead-recipes/

Posted on: 11/10 7:41


Re: Snakehead update: The Giving Pond, DCNR lake, upper Bucks Co

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2011/5/9 15:37
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Quote:

afishinado wrote:
Some fish are "introduced" species into a waterway, which means purposely stocked to enhance fishing or serve some biological function in the ecosystem; while other species are said to be "invasive" because they were introduced illegally or by accident, and are believed to be harmful to the ecosystem.


Oh absolutely some were purposely introduced, but at that point it's just picking and choosing favorites(collectively as fishermen and fish & wildlife agencies)."Let's introduce this popular non-native fish to fish for, and not this, and screw the natives....". We all know examples of fish that were purposely stocked for sport that have had negative impacts on native fisheries, with the aid of pollution and other stuff in many cases too, of course.

But like you said, we don't really know how much the snakeheads will have an impact. Best to attempt to control their numbers, but at the same time we can't forget about fish like muskies or bass, or brown trout since biologically they have no business being there either, even if introduced on purpose. Obviously it's way too late to start any eradication effort, and probably few people would want to(I love fishing for those non-natives too). We freak out if we catch an "invasive" species, but think highly of brown trout from a small mountain stream, or a smallmouth from the Susky, etc. because they're popular sportfish. Yes, snakeheads were introduced illegally, but again....it's picking favorites as for what fish we want in our waters. We(collectively) don't want snakeheads, therefore we didn't purposely introduce them. But bass and trout, and skis.....stock away. None of those belong in many places, and all have an impact to some extent.

Posted on: 11/10 8:18


Re: Snakehead update: The Giving Pond, DCNR lake, upper Bucks Co

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Quote:


Actually they are crediting the aggressive killing of the snakeheads with keeping them in somewhat check. Despite this aggressive removal of the snakeheads they are still here and as previously stated, they are here to stay. They are not going anywhere but if left unchecked other species may. It's really that simple.

While zebra mussels have made the Great Lakes water clarity clearer they have "unleashed ecological havoc" and are "sucking the life out of Lake Michigan and lake huron" according to the experts. That doesn't sound like a plus to me.


If by sucking the life out of the lakes you mean contributing to a crash of alewife (invasive) which contributes to a crash of Pacific salmon and steelhead (introduced) I guess you have a point.

However none of those species are supposed to be there. In lake Huron, native species are doing better population wise than they were prior to the alewife crash (which was probably caused by zebra mussels). The great lakes are a great resource, and lots of fun but the trout and salmon fishery is artificial and dependant upon stocking.

Posted on: 11/10 13:34


Re: Snakehead update: The Giving Pond, DCNR lake, upper Bucks Co

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2013/12/7 0:10
From SE Pa
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It seems the biggest concern is the immense algae blooms and the health effects on humans from the messy unsightly byproduct of the increased algae. Followed closely by the impact on the marine life.

Posted on: 11/10 19:04


Re: Snakehead update: The Giving Pond, DCNR lake, upper Bucks Co

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2014/2/19 19:02
From Philadelphia, PA
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Fredrick, No I'm not encouraging anyone to throw any fish on the bank. We're talking a specific species The states says "Anglers should dispose of them properly" and since you can't posses a live one or release a live one into PA waters. Then you have two options either kill it and let the local critters dispose of it or you take it home and eat it.
With flatheads I've heard the same thing about them decimating the pan fish population. But I've see too many guys fishing the Wissahickon for flathead bait.

Posted on: 11/10 23:22


Re: Snakehead update: The Giving Pond, DCNR lake, upper Bucks Co

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2006/9/9 22:43
From Delaware Co.
Posts: 469
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Quote:

JerryC wrote:
Fredrick, No I'm not encouraging anyone to throw any fish on the bank. We're talking a specific species The states says "Anglers should dispose of them properly" and since you can't posses a live one or release a live one into PA waters. Then you have two options either kill it and let the local critters dispose of it or you take it home and eat it.
With flatheads I've heard the same thing about them decimating the pan fish population. But I've see too many guys fishing the Wissahickon for flathead bait.


Jerry there is no law stating you can’t release them . But if you do it has to be in the water in which they were caught. I bet if you start getting requests for snakehead flies from customers you will change your tune

Just because the state stocks a nonnative fish it doesnt Make it any better for the native fish species or less invasive.

Pooopdeck in the video he said he’s comparing the bass numbers to historical numbers. Yes they have been surveying for only for years but....the fish has been in the surveyed areas for I believe around 12 years that’s a long time for the to fish cohabitate .

Posted on: 11/11 20:58
_________________
Fish where the fish are "
- Jack Gartside -


Re: Snakehead update: The Giving Pond, DCNR lake, upper Bucks Co

Joined:
2009/12/2 19:56
From SE Pa
Posts: 40
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Quote:
It seems the biggest concern is the immense algae blooms and the health effects on humans from the messy unsightly byproduct of the increased algae. Followed closely by the impact on the marine life.

Yep !

Posted on: 11/12 12:02


Re: Snakehead update: The Giving Pond, DCNR lake, upper Bucks Co

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2006/9/9 22:43
From Delaware Co.
Posts: 469
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As I don't agree totally with some of joes information regarding fly fishing for snakeheads. This is a good article though that he wrote about snakeheads .https://joebruceflyfishing.wordpress.com

Posted on: 11/18 18:24
_________________
Fish where the fish are "
- Jack Gartside -


Re: Snakehead update: The Giving Pond, DCNR lake, upper Bucks Co

Joined:
2009/12/2 19:56
From SE Pa
Posts: 40
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Quote:
As I don't agree totally with some of joes information regarding fly fishing for snakeheads. This is a good article though that he wrote about snakeheads .
https://joebruceflyfishing.wordpress.com

Interesting. I don't know a lot about the science, but I do think we need to rethink our fisheries management in Pa. Things like having such a financial focus on cold-water and concentrating stocking in the Spring just months before the water warms in urban and suburban areas are things to wonder about.

I know urban and suburban areas are not pristine, however, thats where many citizens live. And if some fish survive well in those areas, then maybe some attention and funds for fisheries should be directed in that direction.

Posted on: Yesterday 10:34



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