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Small Stream Technique

Joined:
2007/3/1 19:05
From Clarion Area
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I will start this post the same way I've started my other ones...I'm new to fly fishing. In my area I have mostly small streams (about 10-12 feet average width) to fish at. They are mostly shallow with a few deep pockets of 2-4 feet in depth. I was wondering if there is a preferred method to fishing these type of streams (flies, where to cast, where to stand, etc.). I realize that the answer to my own question might just be to try different things and see what works but I was just wondering if anyone had any suggestions. Thanks.

Posted on: 2007/4/3 23:07


Re: Small Stream Technique

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2006/9/10 21:53
From Greensburg, PA
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I think most of the guys will tell you the same things but to start with most of what you'll hear is ...stay low, cast upstream, wear camo or other natural colors, fish the pools but don't pass up even small riffles. Are you talking wild streams or just small?

Posted on: 2007/4/4 9:05


Re: Small Stream Technique
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2006/9/9 9:29
From Monessen, PA
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This will sound silly, perhaps, but try to imagine you are 2 feet tall and the stream is about 3 times as large. Then, just fish it like you would the larger stream. The thing that takes the most getting used to is that fish in small streams will live in very shallow water, so just because a stream section averages a depth of 12 inches, don't walk by. Look for the same kind of features you would look for in the stream 3 times as large-- that rock as big as a softball in the small creek plays the same role as the boulder in the large stream....

Posted on: 2007/4/4 9:13
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Re: Small Stream Technique

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2007/3/1 19:05
From Clarion Area
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Many of the streams do contain wild trout and are stocked. Although it may not seem like it, the stuff you guys are saying is very helpful for me to understand how to approach these streams, I greatly appreciate any input.

Posted on: 2007/4/4 11:11


Re: Small Stream Technique

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2006/9/28 14:40
From Philadelphia
Posts: 381
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tmk,
Just reinforcement of the low and low approach. I fish streams like you describe a lot and mostly from my knees. Had to laugh a bit over JackM's reasonable comment, as I go about it exactly the opposite. I look at a large stream as lots of small streams braided together. Interestingly, I usually find fish at the intersection of the braids.
Coughlin

Posted on: 2007/4/4 11:43


Re: Small Stream Technique

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2006/9/11 13:05
From Lewistown
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Stay low, no false casting. Spring is difficult because the fish spread out. One thing that works for me is called prospecting. That is were I purposely spoke the first few fish to find where they are laying. Making these mental notes will lead to more fish because most of the fish in that stream will be in identical spots. However, every day and every stream is different, that is why I prospect first. When the water warms up bouncing your fly off the bottom isn't important (they will swim over and grab it). However, when the temp is low the fly has to get down and stay down.

Leave no slack in the line, it helps to slowly pull the fly through the water. And after three cast, and no fish, move on-- you either spooked them or they aren't there.

I mostly fish up stream, but often a down stream presentation is very effective. Stay hidden.

Posted on: 2007/4/4 16:08
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Re: Small Stream Technique

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2006/11/4 20:39
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If you haven't learned yet you will have to learn how to side cast, it will generally allow a little more room for your backcast. Keeps the line out of the trees.
Flyman

Posted on: 2007/4/7 10:10


Re: Small Stream Technique

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2007/1/31 20:39
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I got skunked on a small mountain stream this Saturday in northwest NJ. I'm hoping the cold front and the fact that I didn't see any fish are the reasons for this.

What do you guys do about weight on those streams when your nymphing? The rock beds are a lot more jagged and dynamic than of other streams, how do you get the nymphs down in the ruck cracks wihout getting hung up? Or...am I totally taking the wrong approch to nymphing these streams?

Posted on: 2007/4/8 17:38


Re: Small Stream Technique

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2006/9/11 13:05
From Lewistown
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I tie my flies with lead and a lot of it. When it is cold like this, or the water is high, look for 1 gallon sized holes with some rock cover. Drop te heavy fly into the hole and after about 3 seconds bring it up slowly- if something is resisting, set the hook.
With a heavy weighted fly it is easy to unstick yourself, just take your rod tip up stream and pop it a couple of times till the fly comes free, and whatever you do, don't pull it downstream it will wedge it in more. Basically take the fly out the way it went in.
Split shot has a tendancy to get wedged permenately.
Also, you lfy doesn't have to stick to the bottom for its entire drift, you can keep it suspended and the fish will swim over and grap it.

Posted on: 2007/4/9 17:24
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Re: Small Stream Technique

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2007/3/27 9:18
From Benton, PA
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Gotta agree with everyone. Stay Low, walk quiet. Fish it all cause they could be anywhere. I fish lots of Grays Run in lycoming county on my belly!!.....if you see me crawling around i havent lost my keys, im stalking

Posted on: 2007/4/24 14:07


Re: Small Stream Technique

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2007/1/2 11:55
From Bozeman
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I agree with the prospecting approach.

I always start out on a nice leisurely walk... after spotting a few wakes tearing upstream, i get serious about the fishing.

Posted on: 2007/4/24 14:35


Re: Small Stream Technique

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2006/11/2 8:50
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I've been doing this small stream, wild trout fishing a lot this year. It's still pretty cool overnight, so it takes a while for the water to warm up enough to get the fish active.

The best dry fly fishing has been in the warmest part of the day, from around 2 to until the lowering light levels and temps puts an end to it. One day that was about 6:30 and another day they just quit at about 5:30. It was like a switch turning off.

Just walk upstream making casts with dry flies to likely spots. I recommend the good old Parachute Adams of course. And a Parachute Adams with a brown body, whatever that might be called. Sizes 12, 14 mostly, and #16 if they get fussy, but I don't think they will at current stream levels.

Going at the right time is the most important thing. In the morning you can wear yourself out and try all kinds of stuff and not catch much. At the peak time around 4 pm though the brookies were pounding our flies. Anybody who can throw a dry fly up the creek could have caught them.

Posted on: 2007/5/4 20:33


Re: Small Stream Technique

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2006/9/9 17:18
From lancaster county
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ill second that thought....
i was fishing a very cold stream this morning...now while i did catch fish at 6:30 in the morning as i worked down stream and the day got later i started to catch more fish. i went back to holes were fish should have been and caught them this time. 12-3 best time.

Posted on: 2007/5/5 17:37
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