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Re: Is working up-stream dead?

Joined:
2006/12/13 9:28
From Other side of the tracks
Posts: 3497
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Quote:

duckfoot wrote:
Quote:

FarmerDave wrote:
Quote:

streamerguy wrote:
Quote:

FarmerDave wrote:
As far as who should yield, I almost always yield regardless of direction. It's called common courtesy which is what I was taught when I was a kid. Maybe that is why I never had an issue. Nobody has the right of way, do I don't expect anyone to yield to me unless they are a dirty pinner.

And asking whether they're fishing their way up or down is always good, and sometimes that one question turns into a 20min conversation.....and you end up comparing notes when you meet on the way back, and share stories, etc.

Have we met? LOL!


Funny you should mention this...I stopped into my favorite spot last week to find a couple guys downstream of me, and asked if they were going up or down, and I got the "whatever" wave. Grr...


They must have been from Cleveland. LOL!

But seriously. I've had that happen to me, too.

Wife and I were just out for a ride one day during the steelhead run and as usual, it turned into a scouting trip. Was driving along dirt road that follows along the Grand River. I was very familiar with that stretch. You likely know the spot.

Was passing another vehicle at very low speed (huge holes in the road) and we both had our windows opened. While passing, I said, "how are you doing." I wasn't looking for info or anything like that. It was just a friendly greeting like saying hello.

I got the stare.

I watched in my mirror and saw where he parked and knew he was going to fish the big hole. Very popular spot. Well, I knew of another spot maybe 100 yards downstream, so I parked there.

Then I turned to my wife and said, "watch this." I got out and grabbed the spinning rod out of the back and tied on a silver jointed Rebel (or Rapala, can't remember). All I had in the truck that day was bass fishing stuff. Then I said to my wife, I'm going to catch dinner, I'll be back in 10 minutes.

Firs cast, FISH ON!.

Shortest fishing trip ever for me. Walked back to the truck and said to my wife, my mistake, it only took 5 minutes.



Posted on: 5/24 11:52
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Re: Is working up-stream dead?

Joined:
2011/9/13 11:13
From Flourtown, PA
Posts: 133
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When nymph fishing, always upstream. When midge fishing, always upstream. When streamer fishing, always downstream. When dry-fly fishing, upstream unless you're on the Delaware or one of the other more technical streams where an upstream presentation will be laughed off the water. I believe this, because the fish face upstream, so you are approaching from their blind spot, and also because when you set the hook from downstream, you are driving the point into their head, whereas when you set the hook from upstream, you run the risk of pulling the fly from their mouth.

Posted on: 5/24 11:57


Re: Is working up-stream dead?

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2006/12/13 9:28
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Quote:

McSneek wrote:
I like to set up my lawn chair in a good looking spot and may anchor there for hours if the gemmies are hitting. Man some people overthink this whole thing.


You should remove the forked sticks before you leave. They are like leaving a sign that states "fish here."

Posted on: 5/24 11:57
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Hank Patterson for President.



Re: Is working up-stream dead?

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2006/12/13 9:28
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Quote:

NewSal wrote:


The downstream yeilding to upstream is based on that a downstream angler will disturb the water downstream of him, the upstream angler leaves the water upstream of him undisturbed, therefore if a downstream angler fishes downstream to an upstream angler the water the upstream angler was to fish is now disturbed.



Don't care.

Besides, you are disturbing the water for the guy fishing either direction below you.

Then again, the disturbance could mean more food dislodged, triggering trout to feed.

All I am saying is, courtesy is not a 1 way thing and should be based somewhat on common sense.

If anyone gets annoyed while fishing, maybe they should take up golf. I think they even have etiquette rules for that.


Posted on: 5/24 12:04
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Re: Is working up-stream dead?

Joined:
2008/1/31 17:19
From Pretty much everywhere at some point, Thorndale today.
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I tend to prefer to move upstream, but depends on the situation.

Never knew there was any etiquette questions involved, though. It's sometimes good to ask another angler which way he's working and staying away from what's ahead of him. How much room to give him is a function of how crowded it is. If it's a small brookie stream, you pretty much don't go ahead of him, even if it's literally a mile. If that means you drive elsewhere, so be it. If it's Erie tribs, I generally just stay out of that pool. If it's a long pool and crowded day maybe not even that. There's no expectation of people being free to move at will there.

Posted on: 5/24 12:39


Re: Is working up-stream dead?

Joined:
2011/3/31 12:18
From Clearfield
Posts: 338
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There will be many instances where you will run into drag issues if you are always working upstream.

Posted on: 5/24 12:48


Re: Is working up-stream dead?

Joined:
2006/9/9 17:18
From lancaster county
Posts: 994
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Depends for all the other reasons listed but I'll add:
It also depends on the fly.
Ex:
I'll fish sulphurs going upstream.
I prefer to fish caddis and wets downstream.

The current makes skittering/swinging a lot easier and I find it much more effective than fishing them upstream.

YMMV of course.

Posted on: 5/24 12:56
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Re: Is working up-stream dead?

Joined:
2007/6/19 21:49
From Lancaster County
Posts: 753
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I wade directly across the stream, perpendicular to the flow. Then I don't have to wrestle with deciding whether to fish upstream or downstream. It does tend to limit the amount of stream one can fish, though. And it can create angler conflict, say if another angler sets up shop directly across from you. If you both decide to wade across at the same time, it can create an impasse in the middle of the stream, kind of like a game of chicken, and you might have to blink and stand down.

On a serious note, I generally fish upstream. But on small streams with plunge pools, you can change techniques and fish a different fly on the way downstream, so I sometimes fish an equal amount upstream and downstream on a small stream. And on large streams, you can fish downstream as well. When nightfishing, I fish almost exclusively downstream.

Posted on: 5/24 13:14


Re: Is working up-stream dead?

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2011/5/3 12:22
From Morgantown, PA
Posts: 1020
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Quote:

salmonoid wrote:
I wade directly across the stream, perpendicular to the flow.



Haha...You're a pioneer.

Posted on: 5/24 13:22


Re: Is working up-stream dead?

Joined:
2009/10/15 12:02
From Dispositionally, one mile south of Lake LeBoeuf
Posts: 235
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My habits are such that I probably do 95% of my travel on the stream in an upstream direction, regardless of what I am fishing. For one thing, I'm almost always in motion when I fish and this means I leave a pretty significant sediment/silt trail in my wake. This matters, particularly on the smaller waters where I do the majority of my trout fishing.

There is a difference though between stream travel and fishing approach. I'll do what I need to do in order to make the fishing approach I think I need in a given situation. This includes making downstream presentations prn. So, just because I am working upstream does not necessarily mean I am always fishing upstream.

So far as the unwritten rules of angler traffic right of ways, etc., I always yield to another angler regardless of whether they are going up or down when we meet. Then, right after I yield, as often as not I'll just leave and go somewhere else. I get pretty misanthropic when I fish, unless of course I'm fishing with you. Otherwise, if I wanted to see other people, I'd go to the mall or something..

Regarding angler etiquette, I ran into something kind of odd when we were in the Midwest. There, at least according to some people, you were supposed to signal which way you went on the stream by parking on that berm of the bridge. On the upstream side if that is the way you went and vice versa. To be fair though, the handful of guys I ran into who actually thought this was a hard and fast rule were all loud mouth jerks in Cubs hats. More study is warranted..

Posted on: 5/24 13:38


Re: Is working up-stream dead?

Joined:
2011/4/12 17:23
From Lancaster Co.
Posts: 664
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Quote:

FarmerDave wrote:
Quote:

McSneek wrote:
I like to set up my lawn chair in a good looking spot and may anchor there for hours if the gemmies are hitting. Man some people overthink this whole thing.


You should remove the forked sticks before you leave. They are like leaving a sign that states "fish here."


I always toss the forked sticks into the stream or woods and also try to remember to take my snelled hook packets and salmon egg jars with me. Don't want to give away a good spot.

Posted on: 5/24 13:39
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"You might be a big fish, in a little pond. Doesn't mean you've won, cause a long may come, a bigger one."


Re: Is working up-stream dead?

Joined:
2011/4/12 17:23
From Lancaster Co.
Posts: 664
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Friday evening on Penns Creek I watched a guy wade directly out from the bank about 30' until he was almost up to his arm pits in the water. He was in so deep his water bottle and some other trash floated out of the back of his vest. He had to keep his arms horizontal to the water surface to keep from getting wet. He turned around and basically started fishing back in the general direction he came from. It was hard to tell from where I was if he was fishing ever so slightly upstream or downstream. He didn't catch anything by the way...

Posted on: 5/24 13:44
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"You might be a big fish, in a little pond. Doesn't mean you've won, cause a long may come, a bigger one."


Re: Is working up-stream dead?

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2007/7/2 19:40
Posts: 1265
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Once on the Madison river during the Salmon fly hatch[crowded like penns] I walked quite a ways downstream to avoid the mob- started fishing upstream when four guys came down the path-two got in right above-two right below me-probably half mile either direction with no one on either side.
Knew they were out of stater's by that--no reason for it except figuring I might know where the fish were.Like opening day in the east....PO'ed me so I got out and went back in right above the fellows fishing up stream and started doing the amateur night at the bijou bit-sloppy casts et al-they both started hollering at me-really furious-one demanded to know "where are you from?"
I said ,very calmly "Bozeman". He misunderstood and said" New Jersey,well that figures." Thirty odd years later I am still laughing at that..Fond memories--they may have thought they had me outnumbered but I was betting not out rattlesnake protected.Like I said I can be a jerk with the best or worst of them...several times I was ganged up on that way-punks everywhere sadly.

Posted on: 5/24 14:17
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Re: Is working up-stream dead?

Joined:
2009/2/19 19:59
From Mont Co, Pa
Posts: 373
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Quote:

SurfCowboyXX wrote:
I believe this, because the fish face upstream, so you are approaching from their blind spot, and also because when you set the hook from downstream, you are driving the point into their head, whereas when you set the hook from upstream, you run the risk of pulling the fly from their mouth.

Couldn't agree more! That's exactly why I almost always fish upstream.

Posted on: 5/24 14:40
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Re: Is working up-stream dead?

Joined:
2016/2/26 9:10
Posts: 773
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Jeez, some of you take what I said as a hard-line law.
I dont always fish upstream, obviously, I fish downstream, upstream, and any way I can depending on conditions, but generally most of the time I work upstream - it just makes sense to do so.

The downstream yeilds to upstream, and the upstream approach are etiquites that I've heard from multiple old timers.

The point of this was to see if most people still are from the school of fishing upstream, and obviously that is not the case.

Thanks

Posted on: 5/24 14:52



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