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Re: Euro vs. Drop Shot Nymphing

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2016/9/23 15:17
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Thats kinda what I figured. Cant think of any downside, aside from fishing smaller creeks or walking through heavily wooded areas.

Seems like all the people who claim that 10' rods are anything but dry fly rods....are all the people who have never fished or dont own a 10' rod.

Posted on: 3/27 12:06


Re: Euro vs. Drop Shot Nymphing

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2011/9/13 11:13
From Flourtown, PA
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If you are going to be fishing big water with braided currents (Upper D), a 10' rod is so much better for mending and reach casts with dry flies. Because you can mend so much more line, you have a larger actual fishing range (a 9' rod can cast a dry 80 feet, but may only be able to mend 30 or 40 of those feet--a 10' rod can mend another 10 feet or so of line, so you can fish farther away from your body and have a longer drift).

Posted on: 3/27 12:57


Re: Euro vs. Drop Shot Nymphing

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2011/4/6 12:53
From Northwest NJ
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I agree with the advantages of the longer rod being effective for dry fly fishing on the Upper D, however this river is no place for a 10 foot 3 or 4 weight....5 or 6 weights will be needed for the distance, especially with any wind at all.

Posted on: 3/27 13:12


Re: Euro vs. Drop Shot Nymphing

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People fish 2 wts on the upper D. I wouldnt say that its "no place" for 3 or 4 wts. I only use my 6 wt on the windiest of days, and most of the time - it doesnt make much of a difference.

Posted on: 3/27 14:36


Re: Euro vs. Drop Shot Nymphing

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2015/6/1 16:22
From Burke VA
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Quote:

baileyoconnell wrote:
I agree with the advantages of the longer rod being effective for dry fly fishing on the Upper D, however this river is no place for a 10 foot 3 or 4 weight....5 or 6 weights will be needed for the distance, especially with any wind at all.


I've fished it plenty with my 10 foot 4 weight and there was no problem. The longer lever arm actually increases line speed over a shorter rod. The disadvantage is that it creates a more open loop, but if you can control your loop size you're golden. When fishing large dries with my 10 footer I have to tell myself to cast downhill.

Posted on: 3/27 20:19


Re: Euro vs. Drop Shot Nymphing

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2006/9/9 8:53
From York
Posts: 79
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Appreciate all the great information here. I might play around with the drop shot thing...my sister swears by it. I'm also going to try to stay with my KISS way of doing things and have fun.

Posted on: 3/28 9:07


Re: Euro vs. Drop Shot Nymphing

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2011/9/13 11:13
From Flourtown, PA
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Bailey, Ryan is correct-once you add that extra foot, a 4 weight can generate pretty much the same kind of line speed and just cut through the wind. If the wind is too high for my 10' 4 weight, it's probably too much for my 9.5' 6 weight as well.

Posted on: 3/28 11:01


Re: Euro vs. Drop Shot Nymphing

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2006/9/9 11:22
From New Castle, PA
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Quote:

ryansheehan wrote:
The longer lever arm actually increases line speed over a shorter rod.


Technically speaking, you are at the wrong end of the lever so adding an extra foot to the other end makes it take more effort to create the same amount of line speed as with a shorter rod. (Your rod hand is the fulcrum). A longer rod will however pick up the line from the water quicker due to the longer length which may compensate for any small amount of extra effort needed.

However, with modern rods, an extra food, particularly in lighter trout line weights, is not going to make significant difference and the benefits of the extra length are noticed more than the slight amount of extra effort needed. On the other hand, try overhead casting a 10' 6" 7wt switch rod. MUCH harder than a single hand 9' 7wt.

Posted on: 4/7 6:52


Re: Euro vs. Drop Shot Nymphing
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2006/9/11 8:26
From Chester County
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Quote:

PennKev wrote:
Quote:

ryansheehan wrote:
The longer lever arm actually increases line speed over a shorter rod.


Technically speaking, you are at the wrong end of the lever so adding an extra foot to the other end makes it take more effort to create the same amount of line speed as with a shorter rod. (Your rod hand is the fulcrum). A longer rod will however pick up the line from the water quicker due to the longer length which may compensate for any small amount of extra effort needed.

However, with modern rods, an extra food, particularly in lighter trout line weights, is not going to make significant difference and the benefits of the extra length are noticed more than the slight amount of extra effort needed. On the other hand, try overhead casting a 10' 6" 7wt switch rod. MUCH harder than a single hand 9' 7wt.


Very confusing subject.

True about the lever, but when moving from trout fishing to say saltwater and distance casting, one must learn to lengthen their casting stroke. Adding length to the rod increases that distance and makes casting a long line a little easier. But yes, it takes more effort to cast a long rod because of the added travel of the tip.

If you want to really work hard, try casting a 5' fly rod for any distance..lol. Theoretically, it should be easier. Like I said...very confusing subject.

The spey and switch thing is really confusing and I wish the industry would change the numbers since most FFers have weights for single hand rods etched in their mind. A 7wt switch rod is designed to cast a 380gr line (I used the Orvis chart for switch lines) while a 7wt single hand is designed to cast a 185g weight line. The switch rod is rated to cast a line twice as heavy as a SH rod.

I agree that a switch rod other than the very light one, like 3 or 4wts, are not designed for single hand casting.

Posted on: 4/7 8:13


Re: Euro vs. Drop Shot Nymphing

Joined:
2015/6/1 16:22
From Burke VA
Posts: 1224
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Quote:

PennKev wrote:
Quote:

ryansheehan wrote:
The longer lever arm actually increases line speed over a shorter rod.


Technically speaking, you are at the wrong end of the lever so adding an extra foot to the other end makes it take more effort to create the same amount of line speed as with a shorter rod. (Your rod hand is the fulcrum). A longer rod will however pick up the line from the water quicker due to the longer length which may compensate for any small amount of extra effort needed.

However, with modern rods, an extra food, particularly in lighter trout line weights, is not going to make significant difference and the benefits of the extra length are noticed more than the slight amount of extra effort needed. On the other hand, try overhead casting a 10' 6" 7wt switch rod. MUCH harder than a single hand 9' 7wt.


I'm not sure I agree with you on this one. The longer lever arm creates more swing speed at the rod tip. The further away from the fulcrum you are during the swing, the faster that point is going. Its true that as rods get longer swing weights do go up but like you said with modern day rods this is not much of an issue. Fun discussion, physics of swings wheather it's tennis, baseball or fly fishing fascinates me.

Posted on: 4/7 8:21


Re: Euro vs. Drop Shot Nymphing

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2006/9/9 11:22
From New Castle, PA
Posts: 311
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There are a lot of switch check rods that don't really follow any rules as to line weight designation, particularly in regard to the first wave of rods to hit the market years ago. At any rate, my analogy wasn't to bring actual two handed casting into the equation but only to demonstrate the effects of a very long, heavy rod.

As to a long rod making it easier to create line speed in heavier single hand applications, consider that one of the current fads in rods is sub-8ft 7wt+ rods geared towards bass and like/muskie fisherman. IMO, the real advantage of a longer rod for distance casting is the ability carry line in the air without slapping on the water or ground on the back casts or false casts. Short rods can generate good line speeds without a problem, the problem is you need better casting mechanics to keep from false casting into the water before your final delivery.

Posted on: 4/7 8:29


Re: Euro vs. Drop Shot Nymphing
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2006/9/11 8:26
From Chester County
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Quote:

PennKev wrote:
There are a lot of switch check rods that don't really follow any rules as to line weight designation, particularly in regard to the first wave of rods to hit the market years ago. At any rate, my analogy wasn't to bring actual two handed casting into the equation but only to demonstrate the effects of a very long, heavy rod.

As to a long rod making it easier to create line speed in heavier single hand applications, consider that one of the current fads in rods is sub-8ft 7wt+ rods geared towards bass and like/muskie fisherman. IMO, the real advantage of a longer rod for distance casting is the ability carry line in the air without slapping on the water or ground on the back casts or false casts. Short rods can generate good line speeds without a problem, the problem is you need better casting mechanics to keep from false casting into the water before your final delivery.


Add this to the confusion > shorter rods are better tools for fighting fish since more leverage tips the advantage towards the fish when fighting against a longer rod.

Posted on: 4/7 8:45

Edited by afishinado on 2017/4/7 9:19:52


Re: Euro vs. Drop Shot Nymphing

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2016/9/23 15:17
Posts: 56
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Now I'm confused. lol. But I like my 10' hardy a lot!

Posted on: 4/7 9:27


Re: Euro vs. Drop Shot Nymphing
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Quote:

cms829 wrote:
Now I'm confused. lol. But I like my 10' hardy a lot!




Yes sir! Find a 10 footer that casts well for you, and you will see how well it performs for all types of fishing.

My 10 footers are my go-to rods for nearly all my freshwater fishing. 10/4 for trout and 10/7 for smallies and steelhead.

And to really get the most out of your 10' rod, match it up with a fly line with a long head. The longer head will extend your ability to mend, roll cast and overhead for longer distances.


Posted on: 4/7 9:55


Re: Euro vs. Drop Shot Nymphing

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2006/11/2 8:50
Posts: 1429
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Quote:

PennKev wrote:

As to a long rod making it easier to create line speed in heavier single hand applications, consider that one of the current fads in rods is sub-8ft 7wt+ rods geared towards bass and like/muskie fisherman.



What benefits are they stating for shortish fly rods for bass and muskie fishing?






Posted on: 4/7 14:52



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