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Re: Euro vs. Drop Shot Nymphing

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2006/9/9 11:22
From New Castle, PA
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Quote:

Skook wrote:
What sort of rod and fly line would you recommend as a versatile "all-around" set-up that would work well for using these various techniques?

I'm now wondering whether a "regular" rod (whatever that is) used for high-stick nymphing will also work well for Euro style fishing or whether an ESN style rod with a stout butt and light, sensitive tip section would also work well for indicator fishing.

Are the rods/lines different enough that it's almost necessary to have a dedicated rod and fly line for each of the various techniques?


The real question should be; Do you also want the same rod to fish dries and cast streamers too?

There are some grey areas also. For example a 10ft 4wt with a conventional line is still pretty versatile for most trout fishing but has some advantages when high stick and tightline nymphing.

A 10ft+ 2 or 3wt, in comparison, is more specialized, and when coupled with some of the level of nearly level "competition" lines, has very little versatility IMO. There are times I've thought such a rig would be ideal, but I usually prefer to maintain some versatility. The person who is fine with fishing a certain way all day would see it differently.

To quickly answer your question, you don't need a special rod to get into the various nymphing techniques. Learn them first, then decide what fine tuning of your equipment will help you and fit into your fishing habits.

Kev

Posted on: 3/23 20:51


Re: Euro vs. Drop Shot Nymphing

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2015/6/1 16:22
From Burke VA
Posts: 1225
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Quote:

Skook wrote:
What sort of rod and fly line would you recommend as a versatile "all-around" set-up that would work well for using these various techniques?

I'm now wondering whether a "regular" rod (whatever that is) used for high-stick nymphing will also work well for Euro style fishing or whether an ESN style rod with a stout butt and light, sensitive tip section would also work well for indicator fishing.

Are the rods/lines different enough that it's almost necessary to have a dedicated rod and fly line for each of the various techniques?


No, I use a 10 foot 4 weight for many different nymphing styles. The key is a long rod for line management and a sensitive tip for feel when not using an indicator.

Posted on: 3/23 20:53


Re: Euro vs. Drop Shot Nymphing

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I have several rods ranging from 3 wt to 9 wt. The longest is the 9 wt at 9'6". The shortest are a 7' 5/6 wt and 7' 4 wt. Most of my rods were purchased years ago when highly specialized rods weren't nearly as in vogue as they seem to be now.

Of the rods that I own currently, I guess a 9' 5 wt would be my best choice.

Maybe I'll look into something like a 10' 4wt. I have another post here asking about Euro rods, but I might be leaning toward something more versatile.

Posted on: 3/23 21:26


Re: Euro vs. Drop Shot Nymphing

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A 9 foot rod is not an ideal choice to nymph with. It can be done don't get me wrong but that extra foot makes a big difference. A 10 foot 4 weight is more versatile than most people think.

Posted on: 3/23 21:54


Re: Euro vs. Drop Shot Nymphing
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Quote:

PennKev wrote:


The best advice is learn a variety of ways to rig and fish nymphs, learn to recognize when and where these methods are best used, and keep an open mind. Don't get too caught up in trends, think critically. Keep trying new things and find what works for you.



A lot of good advice by all. PK sums up the deal above ^.


I'm an Indy, tight-line, high-stick, dry-dropper, Czech, Spanish, French, Polish, drop-shot bounce nympher......

The secret (and the fun) is to be able to choose the best method from above, and apply it to the water and fish in front of you at the time.

Or you can choose to fish dries only and have fun doing that!

Posted on: 3/24 7:23


Re: Euro vs. Drop Shot Nymphing

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I'd agree with Ryan, but I'll take the other side. A 10' 4wt isn't ideal for dry flies (or streamers). If you mostly nymph and only switch to dries when you think you will catch more fish that way, get a 10' 4wt. If you fish dry or dry dropper and only nymph when you can't buy a bite get a 8-9' 5 or 6wt. If you want to add small streamers to the mix get a 8-9' 6wt.

The closest thing I do to nymphing is dry dropper so I have no interest in a 10' rod. I have a 7wt for streamers and have a bunch of different 5 and 6 weight rods from 7' to 9' I use for dry/dry dropper. I pick those mostly based on wind and somewhat on fly size. I prefer to fish with a 6 weight but will drop down to 4 or 5 weights if I am fishing flat water at short distances.

I am slowly moving towards shorter rods because I don't lose much distance casting, and its easier for me to land fish using shorter rods (I don't use a net unless I'm in a boat). I can cast well beyond normal fishing distance (70'+) with an 8' 5 or 6 weight, and I think fighting a fish is easier on a shorter rod.

Take this for what its worth, I go against the grain - I don't use disk drag reels for anything (including steelhead), and I fish the biggest steelhead water in the great lakes system regularly. I'm sure if I fished differently I'd catch more fish. I enjoy casting almost as much as I enjoy catching fish so the way I fish usually involves bigger water and longer, accurate casts. I don't get much enjoyment lobbing a bobber or a heavy nymph rig, or relying on a disk drag to control a fish. As far as nets, I feel I put less stress on a fish not using a net. If I took pics of fish, I would use a net.

Posted on: 3/24 7:56


Re: Euro vs. Drop Shot Nymphing
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moon1284 wrote:
I'd agree with Ryan, but I'll take the other side. A 10' 4wt isn't ideal for dry flies (or streamers). If you mostly nymph and only switch to dries when you think you will catch more fish that way, get a 10' 4wt. If you fish dry or dry dropper and only nymph when you can't buy a bite get a 8-9' 5 or 6wt. If you want to add small streamers to the mix get a 8-9' 6wt.

The closest thing I do to nymphing is dry dropper so I have no interest in a 10' rod. I have a 7wt for streamers and have a bunch of different 5 and 6 weight rods from 7' to 9' I use for dry/dry dropper. I pick those mostly based on wind and somewhat on fly size. I prefer to fish with a 6 weight but will drop down to 4 or 5 weights if I am fishing flat water at short distances.

I am slowly moving towards shorter rods because I don't lose much distance casting, and its easier for me to land fish using shorter rods (I don't use a net unless I'm in a boat). I can cast well beyond normal fishing distance (70'+) with an 8' 5 or 6 weight, and I think fighting a fish is easier on a shorter rod.

Take this for what its worth, I go against the grain - I don't use disk drag reels for anything (including steelhead), and I fish the biggest steelhead water in the great lakes system regularly. I'm sure if I fished differently I'd catch more fish. I enjoy casting almost as much as I enjoy catching fish so the way I fish usually involves bigger water and longer, accurate casts. I don't get much enjoyment lobbing a bobber or a heavy nymph rig, or relying on a disk drag to control a fish. As far as nets, I feel I put less stress on a fish not using a net. If I took pics of fish, I would use a net.


I have every just about every length rod to choose from and I fish my 10' 4wt most often. In fact, almost exclusively for trout fishing except for the smallest of streams.

If you fish dries most of the time, than mending is important. A 10' rod allows you to mend longer distances and also makes roll casting easier.

I've never had any issues landing fish with a longer rod.


Posted on: 3/24 8:15


Re: Euro vs. Drop Shot Nymphing

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2016/2/26 9:10
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Quote:

moon1284 wrote:
I'd agree with Ryan, but I'll take the other side. A 10' 4wt isn't ideal for dry flies (or streamers). If you mostly nymph and only switch to dries when you think you will catch more fish that way, get a 10' 4wt. If you fish dry or dry dropper and only nymph when you can't buy a bite get a 8-9' 5 or 6wt. If you want to add small streamers to the mix get a 8-9' 6wt.

The closest thing I do to nymphing is dry dropper so I have no interest in a 10' rod. I have a 7wt for streamers and have a bunch of different 5 and 6 weight rods from 7' to 9' I use for dry/dry dropper. I pick those mostly based on wind and somewhat on fly size. I prefer to fish with a 6 weight but will drop down to 4 or 5 weights if I am fishing flat water at short distances.

I am slowly moving towards shorter rods because I don't lose much distance casting, and its easier for me to land fish using shorter rods (I don't use a net unless I'm in a boat). I can cast well beyond normal fishing distance (70'+) with an 8' 5 or 6 weight, and I think fighting a fish is easier on a shorter rod.

Take this for what its worth, I go against the grain - I don't use disk drag reels for anything (including steelhead), and I fish the biggest steelhead water in the great lakes system regularly. I'm sure if I fished differently I'd catch more fish. I enjoy casting almost as much as I enjoy catching fish so the way I fish usually involves bigger water and longer, accurate casts. I don't get much enjoyment lobbing a bobber or a heavy nymph rig, or relying on a disk drag to control a fish. As far as nets, I feel I put less stress on a fish not using a net. If I took pics of fish, I would use a net.


Im a big time fan of 10' and longer rods. The entire point isnt casting distance, but its line control, and having the reach to reach accross seams and currents, and longer rods make a huge difference when your talking about reach and line control during drifts. Ill have a 10'-6" 2wt rod in the quiver by next month

Posted on: 3/24 9:44


Re: Euro vs. Drop Shot Nymphing

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2015/6/1 16:22
From Burke VA
Posts: 1225
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As some have mentioned the line control advantages far outweigh any casting restrictions. That being said a good 10 foot 4 weight casts dry flies very nicely.

Posted on: 3/24 11:01


Re: Euro vs. Drop Shot Nymphing

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2006/9/9 11:22
From New Castle, PA
Posts: 311
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Quote:

ryansheehan wrote:
As some have mentioned the line control advantages far outweigh any casting restrictions. That being said a good 10 foot 4 weight casts dry flies very nicely.


Agreed. A 10' 4wt is not going to handicap the typical trout fisherman in any significant or perhaps even any noticable way. it will, however, help when nymphing which is what most anglers do most of the time anyway.

Posted on: 3/24 19:31


Re: Euro vs. Drop Shot Nymphing

Joined:
2006/11/2 8:50
Posts: 1429
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Quote:

afishinado wrote:
Quote:

PennKev wrote:


The best advice is learn a variety of ways to rig and fish nymphs, learn to recognize when and where these methods are best used, and keep an open mind. Don't get too caught up in trends, think critically. Keep trying new things and find what works for you.



A lot of good advice by all. PK sums up the deal above ^.


I'm an Indy, tight-line, high-stick, dry-dropper, Czech, Spanish, French, Polish, drop-shot bounce nympher......



You missed one style of nymph fishing:

Fishing nymphs at short, medium and long distances with no strike indicator.

With a 7 1/2 ft Fenwick fiberglass rod!

That's the way I nymph fished when I started fly fishing, and it was commonly done at that time (the 1970s).

There were no strike indicators then. And this was before graphite rods. And fly rods of 7 and 7 1/2 ft were pretty standard.

Both indicators and graphite rods (which were made longer because graphite is a lighter material than glass) became popular in the 1980s.

I still nymph fish at short, medium and long distances without an indicator. (But the old Fenwick is long gone.)

If you've never tried fishing nymphs with 30 feet of line out and no strike indicator, try it. It's an interesting way of fishing.



Posted on: 3/25 9:46


Re: Euro vs. Drop Shot Nymphing

Joined:
2015/6/1 16:22
From Burke VA
Posts: 1225
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My first fly rods were 6-7.5 feet long but the nostalgia would quickly wear off. I wouldn't want to use those again anymore than I would want to wear those rubber waders again.

Posted on: 3/25 17:25


Re: Euro vs. Drop Shot Nymphing

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2016/9/23 15:17
Posts: 56
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Can anyone actually give first hand experience or a specific reason aside from hypothetical opinions on WHY a 10' rod fishes dries with a disadvantage over a 9' rod? I see this everywhere online that the 10' rods are great for nymphing, but dont fish dries well...but no one actually gives a specific reason or personal experience. Just says one is better than the other.

I've only had my 10' 3 wt for a day now and only 3 hours on it, but was hoping I could use this as an all arounder up on the west/east branch and upstate. I cant physically wrap my head around why a 10' rod would be at a disadvantage fishing dries compared to a 8' or 9' rod.

Im not being a jerk - I really want to understand the down side.

Posted on: 3/27 9:21


Re: Euro vs. Drop Shot Nymphing
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From Chester County
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I fish my 10' 4wt for dries all the time. In fact the extra length casts and mends easier than a shorter rod.

Posted on: 3/27 10:12


Re: Euro vs. Drop Shot Nymphing

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2016/2/26 9:10
Posts: 787
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Quote:

afishinado wrote:
I fish my 10' 4wt for dries all the time. In fact the extra length casts and mends easier than a shorter rod.


Same, I haven't touched my shorter rods sense using 10 footers. Can't find any downside to them, other then just watching the length when walking through brush, every other fishing application a 10 footer just works best for me, reach and line control.

Cant wait to try out a 10.5'

Posted on: 3/27 10:48



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