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Re: my first timber rattler

Joined:
2007/4/12 8:01
From Pittsburgh
Posts: 244
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I let him be. I figure he lives there, not me. But I'm not ashamed to say that I was pretty freaked out.

I had it in my mind to be on the lookout for rattlers - I had heard that they were pretty common in the area. I walked along with my wading staff taping ahead on logs, rocks, etc...didn't want to surprise one.

This guy was sitting right next to the trail if I hadn't seen him I would have walked right by within a bout a foot or so.

I saw it before it rattled - but as I took a step closer to get a look it started to rattle. So it would have warned me.

it was cool to see, no doubt makes a good story - but like I said I was pretty freaked out.

I was back in there pretty far by myself and the prospect of hoofing it out snakebitten didn't appeal very strongly.

I had fished in for a few hours and had just started my way back (literally about 1 minute on the trail)when i saw it - so I was looking at several miles of hiking to get out in, what I now knew was snake infested woods.

All I could imagine was one snake after another along the trail - not true I reckon' but my pulse was definitely up.

So I went back to the stream and kept to the stream the whole way back - figuring they don't like cold water too much.

I'll tell you one thing for my summer small stream explorations I'm going to get a pair of good old-fashioned thick rubber hippers. I know that the snake would have no problem getting through the light weight breathables that I had on - but I think the rubber hip waders ought to be pretty snake proof.

This is the first timber rattler - but the second rattler in two years (after never seeing one before). Last year in Utah i almost stepped on one that never rattled at me until I literally stepped about 2 inches from it.

and on another snake note - when I got back to the camp - my wife had a picture on her phone from her morning run on the bike trail at Ohiopyle. It was a stinking copperhead! Two poisonous snakes in the same day.

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Posted on: 2013/5/28 9:53
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Re: my first timber rattler

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2009/7/29 10:25
Posts: 1808
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to me, thick rubber hippers would be pretty hot. these protect waders from thorns and you from snakes

http://www.cabelas.com/product/Cabela ... -Armor-Gaiters/750260.uts

Posted on: 2013/5/28 9:57


Re: my first timber rattler

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2010/8/31 15:00
From Lehigh Valley PA
Posts: 104
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cool picture. I have to admit, I am always really on edge about rattlers when I fish. I guess that's good because I'm always on the lookout. I know two people who got bit (both turkey hunters) in NC PA. Both were bitten in the hand. Both were climbing up a steep bank and reached out for brush to hold onto..... BAM. Neither of the snakes rattled prior to strike. So I'm really careful going up banks.


Posted on: 2013/5/28 10:53


Re: my first timber rattler

Joined:
2011/7/6 13:48
From Philadelphia PA
Posts: 1578
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I'm glad that the number of rattles do not equate to the number of people that they bit.

P.S. Do not count the rattles when you've been drinking, cause we all have heard that the most bites occur when someone shows someone what they can do with a rattlesnake and a few drinks.


Note: The PA Brown Snake is not a Water Moccasin (Look similar) so please do not kill them.


Posted on: 2013/5/28 11:14
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"I am respected when I walk into any fly shop. Salespeople wait on me hand and waders. I once tried underwater casting just to see if I could. I am the most admired Fly Fisherman in the world. And when I fly-fish, I use the Orvis Access. Stay Fishing MF


Re: my first timber rattler

Joined:
2013/5/15 10:50
From PA
Posts: 55
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Those are neat pictures. I have always thought snakes are pretty cool, and I try to photo them when I see them, used to keep some non poisonous ones as pets. Congrats.

As far as the copperhead pic goes, that place has as many copperheads as anywhere that I am personally aware of. We go to Ohiopyle several times yearly for that very reason - just to try to see some coppers. There is a lot of water snakes also, but usually if you try hard enough you will see a copper or two every time.

Posted on: 2013/5/28 11:15


Re: my first timber rattler

Joined:
2007/4/12 8:01
From Pittsburgh
Posts: 244
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Brown71 - I don't think my wife will be doing any more early morning runs on that trail! She practically stepped on that snake. Good to know they're fairly common - so I can keep an eye out.

Posted on: 2013/5/28 11:23
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Re: my first timber rattler

Joined:
2012/6/5 21:59
From Banshee
Posts: 287
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Fishing Muddy Creek in York co a few weeks ago in the fly area I wanted to avoid an angler upstream. In order to do that I had climb a very rocky overgrown hillside. In that jungle I came across a dead snake hanging from a tree branch. By the fangs on it, it had to be a rattler. But the head on it was nealry two inches across. Not sure if someone killed it and stuck it there or it wedged itself after high water. It looked like some kind of trespassing sign for some sacred indian territory, very eerie. If I return I'll have to get a picture.

Posted on: 2013/5/28 14:44


Re: my first timber rattler

Joined:
2007/6/19 21:49
From Lancaster County
Posts: 1532
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Quote:

laszlo wrote:
Fishing Muddy Creek in York co a few weeks ago in the fly area I wanted to avoid an angler upstream. In order to do that I had climb a very rocky overgrown hillside. In that jungle I came across a dead snake hanging from a tree branch. By the fangs on it, it had to be a rattler. But the head on it was nealry two inches across. Not sure if someone killed it and stuck it there or it wedged itself after high water. It looked like some kind of trespassing sign for some sacred indian territory, very eerie. If I return I'll have to get a picture.


Grab a picture - I'm pretty sure that rattlers have been extirpated in York County for sometime, except maybe for a thin sliver of ridge on South Mountain up near the Cumberland County line. Usually, fangs have little to do with IDing snakes - its the head and eye shape that matters.

Posted on: 2013/5/28 15:12


Re: my first timber rattler

Joined:
2012/6/5 21:59
From Banshee
Posts: 287
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I'll have to get a picture, the head was huge,almost photoshopped

Posted on: 2013/5/28 15:54


Re: my first timber rattler

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2009/2/19 19:59
From Mont Co, Pa
Posts: 2030
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Just look to see if it has rattles. They're fairly obvious.

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Posted on: 2013/5/28 16:05
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Re: my first timber rattler

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2011/5/3 12:22
From South Lebanon Township, PA
Posts: 1943
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laszlo - Unless it was an escaped pet, or someone intentionally put in there after killing it somewhere else, odds are that was a Northern Copperhead you saw in York Co. The long fangs definitely suggest a venomous snake, and the wide head suggests a pit viper…of which both Copperheads and Rattlers are. In PA Rattlers are generally only found north and west of Blue Mountain (the southern/easternmost ridge in the ridge/valley region) though. The main exception being a small population in the South Mountain region of Michaux SF. Copperheads are probably reasonably common in the type of habitat that surrounds Muddy Creek in York Co.

Posted on: 2013/5/28 16:23


Re: my first timber rattler

Joined:
2012/6/5 21:59
From Banshee
Posts: 287
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Definately no rattles, that half of the snake was missing, I was simply going by the fangs, so probably not a rattler.

Posted on: 2013/5/28 16:44


Re: my first timber rattler

Joined:
2012/3/14 23:03
Posts: 314
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For the sex identification you have to count the subcaudal scales, which are before the rattle, 21 or more for a male. Snake has to be 42 inches in length or more to attempt to prevent the harvesting of females, because males are generally larger. This video is in Pa, and at 3:45 you can see them tube the snake and count the subcaudals. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FsFpi3JH4bo I think I've heard people say that the only true sexing method is a probing, but I dunno


Posted on: 2013/5/28 16:46



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