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Re: Steelhead in the Delaware River?

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2006/9/11 15:10
From collegeville, pa
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"Cantaloop" - thanks for the monday chuckle...

Posted on: 2012/7/23 12:50


Re: Steelhead in the Delaware River?

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From Tioga co. formerly of bucks co.
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Dam's have been around the lehigh valley way before the sixties..they started back in the 1800's....

Posted on: 2012/7/24 8:39
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Re: Steelhead in the Delaware River?

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2006/9/13 10:18
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From Wikipedia
The Lehigh Canal, designed by Canvass White, an engineer of New York's Erie Canal, was constructed between 1827 and 1829. The enlarged Lehigh Navigation extended 46 miles (74 km) between Mauch Chunk, Pennsylvania (present-day Jim Thorpe) and Easton with 52 locks, eight guard locks, eight dams and six aqueducts, allowing the waterway to overcome a difference in elevation of over 350 feet (107 m). A weigh lock determined canal boat fees a half mile (1 km) south of Mauch Chunk. A connection across the Delaware River to the Morris Canal through New Jersey allowed the coal from the Lehigh Canal to be shipped more directly to New York City.

During the 1830s, an extension of 26 miles (42 km) to White Haven, Pennsylvania, which included 20 dams and 29 locks, was constructed, covering a difference in elevation of over 600 feet (183 m) to Mauch Chunk.

In 1855, the canal reached its peak of more than one million tons of cargo. However, competition from railroads and the catastrophic flood of June 4, 1862, were all steps towards the canal's demise. The canal was used as a means of transportation until the 1940s (about a decade after other similar canals ceased operations), making it the last fully functioning towpath canal in North America. In 1962, most of it was sold to private and public organizations for recreational use.
I know of only one dam on the Delaware aside from the 3 wing dams, an old wooden structure, that I believe still exists at Lackawaxen PA just south of the Confluence of the Lackawaxen R. before the Roebling Viaduct. I found it when wading that section of the river when fishing. That doesn't mean there were more dams, but the books about the Delaware don't talk about them.
The Dam at Lackawaxen was contriversial in it's day because loggers were already running log rafts from the Upper Delaware River by the early 1800's, and didn't want to deal with going over the dam. The dam was eventually removed in favor of the viaduct. The dam was built for crossing canal boats across the Delaware

Posted on: 2012/7/24 9:06
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Re: Steelhead in the Delaware River?

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2011/11/5 14:27
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The introduction of Atlantic Salmon would be ideal if the proper environmental conditions existed in the Delaware, but they don't.
There was a very influencial group that tried for many years to get rougher pacific salmon like cohos introduced to the Delaware, however the EPA blocked them. Sorry I can't recall the name of the organization, bit they tried long and hard to establish a legal stocking program and the introduction of pacific salmon in the Delaware with no success. With the current regulations protecting native species we have we would never have created the salmon, steelhead, and brown trout fisheries that currectly exist in the great lakes. Would never happen and you can decide if that is a good or bad thing. The other main problem with developing native and non native runs of sea-run trout & Salmon on the east coast is that many of them get caught in the nets of salwater commercial fisherman in the bays and the estuaries in the spring and the fall. I know a good number of commercial fisherman that catch and quietly sell sea-run brown and rainbow trout to private buyers like resturants without ever reporting them because they do not want the state and federal agencies to know about them. Whether they have the genes or not lots of sea run rainbows and browns show up in the nets of the saltwater commercial fishers every year. Especially shad and striper netters in the Delaware and the pound and gill nets in Virginia and Maryland. The trout are trying to establish their own sea-run populations, however dams, enviromental challenges, and commercial fishing are significant barriers to their success.

Posted on: 2012/7/24 9:51

Edited by LongWader on 2012/7/24 10:07:07


Re: Steelhead in the Delaware River?

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2006/9/11 15:10
From collegeville, pa
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good post LongWader..I learned something

Jeff

Posted on: 2012/7/24 16:29


Re: Steelhead in the Delaware River?

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From Tioga co. formerly of bucks co.
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there are sea run browns in the delaware..

Posted on: 2012/7/24 18:28
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Re: Steelhead in the Delaware River?

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2009/2/11 13:14
From Lehigh Valley
Posts: 1269
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Sandfly,
Have you ever caught one? I am not being smart, I am very curious.

Posted on: 2012/7/24 18:53


Re: Steelhead in the Delaware River?

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2011/4/12 8:04
From Whitehall, PA
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SBecker,
Yes, long ago I heard those stories of steelhead being stocked in the Little Lehigh in the 60's. Going along with the stories were reports of fishermen catching one now and then at the base of the Lehigh River, because it was said the Steelhead couldn't get over the dam and into the Lehigh.

Jeff

Posted on: 2012/7/24 18:54


Re: Steelhead in the Delaware River?

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2006/9/13 10:18
From LV
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If there were steelhead in the Delaware left from the stocking, that little dam would not have prevented them from moving up.

Posted on: 2012/7/24 20:13
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Re: Steelhead in the Delaware River?

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2009/2/11 13:14
From Lehigh Valley
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You could always sacrifice a male and female steelhead an get the eggs from the female an put them in a live well immediately take the male an squeeze the milt onto the eggs an keep the eggs in a live well with a powerhead to put a lil current on it till you get home, place some eggs in two halfs of a strawberry plastic green cage an place in some gravel..start your own run.i wouldnt do it but hey knock yer socks off

Posted on: 2012/7/25 15:02


Re: Steelhead in the Delaware River?

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2006/9/11 11:30
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Ouch - bucket biology has done a lot of damage over the years. Bigger organizations screw up too, but some work in preserving heritage trout from the Adirondacks to out West has gone up in smoke because somebody figured they knew better. Plus there are the diseases. For example, NJ is thankfully VHS free for the moment; Lake Ontario is not. I'd hate to spread another disease to a crowded state where the fish are subject to all kinds of stresses already. VHS did weird things to the Finger Lakes - don't care to see it spread.

I'm not big on spreading fish all over, but if you do try it the legal way and get a permit and assure the fish are disease free.

There are differences between the migratory and non-migratory trout - but not as much as you may think. All trout have some migratory past since 15,000 years ago the trout range was basically all under a sheet of ice and the trout had to migrate to recolonize the cold water environments. The California rainbows migrate quite a lot since the Sierra streams that are their home are subject to severe droughts and floods and fish move into areas with low populations. Therefore, I think some of the Delaware rainbows would show some seagoing behavior if the enviroment were right for it.

Posted on: 2012/7/25 17:05


Re: Steelhead in the Delaware River?

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... delete... damn this is an old thread

Posted on: 2012/8/7 11:52


Re: Steelhead in the Delaware River?

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2009/5/26 8:36
From York & Starlight, PA
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cmkracken wrote;

"Those 16-18 inch fish are a waste of time...(if youre going to drive all the way to the delaware you might as well target the pigs not the chickens)"

Your comment suggests that you have disdain for 16" - 18" wild browns & rainbows. The inference, at least to me, is you catch far larger trout. Do you catch 18"+ fish frequently?

I'd venture to bet 95% of the members of this forum would be pretty damn excited to be catching all those "waste of time" 16" - 18" trout that you seem to have little regard for.

I fish the Delaware system probably as much, or more, than most people on this forum, and have done so, for over twenty years. To suggest that 16" - 18" wild trout are a "waste of time" does a disservice to the trout and the fishery.

The average Delaware system (WB, EB, & main) trout is far less than 16". I'd venture to say the average WB & EB trout is more in the 12" - 14" range and at that size is a great fighter for it's size. Possibly 15" - 16" is average for the main stem.

I've caught dozens of 20" + trout on the system but still love to catch those 14" - 16" youngsters that eat the fly eagerly. Even back in the late 1960's to early 1980's before the system received all the hype and became "the Big Horn of the East" Haha! any fish of 17" and bigger was considered a very nice trout.

If you are going to judge a trip to the system by how many over 18" trout you put in the net you are likely going to go home dissatisfied. I used to keep a log and there are hundreds of 12" -17" trout and maybe a dozen or two 18"+ - 20". In over forty years on the Delaware I've only landed two honest, measured, rainbows of over 20". One was 21" caught below Lordville in the spring on a #14 Adams and the other was 22" caught on a #16 Rusty spinner below Hancock.

Browns are another story and they are far more common now than they were thirty years ago. Either I've gotten better or they have gotten bigger because back in the 70's & 80's a 20" brown was a great fish on any of the rivers.

While it is exciting to catch 20" and larger trout I'll be more than happy to catch those "waste of time" trout all day long!

Attach file:



jpg  Somewhere in NY.jpg (205.01 KB)
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jpg  Copy of Stilesville Brown June 24, 2010.jpg (85.92 KB)
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jpg  Hale Eddy 2012.jpg (154.42 KB)
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jpg  Matt & George #3.jpg (240.35 KB)
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Posted on: 2012/8/8 9:27
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Re: Steelhead in the Delaware River?

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2006/9/10 16:07
From Pine Grove
Posts: 2425
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Quote:

wbranch wrote:
cmkracken wrote;

"Those 16-18 inch fish are a waste of time...(if youre going to drive all the way to the delaware you might as well target the pigs not the chickens)"

Your comment suggests that you have disdain for 16" - 18" wild browns & rainbows. The inference, at least to me, is you catch far larger trout. Do you catch 18"+ fish frequently?

I'd venture to bet 95% of the members of this forum would be pretty damn excited to be catching all those "waste of time" 16" - 18" trout that you seem to have little regard for.

I fish the Delaware system probably as much, or more, than most people on this forum, and have done so, for over twenty years. To suggest that 16" - 18" wild trout are a "waste of time" does a disservice to the trout and the fishery.

The average Delaware system (WB, EB, & main) trout is far less than 16". I'd venture to say the average WB & EB trout is more in the 12" - 14" range and at that size is a great fighter for it's size. Possibly 15" - 16" is average for the main stem.

I've caught dozens of 20" + trout on the system but still love to catch those 14" - 16" youngsters that eat the fly eagerly. Even back in the late 1960's to early 1980's before the system received all the hype and became "the Big Horn of the East" Haha! any fish of 17" and bigger was considered a very nice trout.

If you are going to judge a trip to the system by how many over 18" trout you put in the net you are likely going to go home dissatisfied. I used to keep a log and there are hundreds of 12" -17" trout and maybe a dozen or two 18"+ - 20". In over forty years on the Delaware I've only landed two honest, measured, rainbows of over 20". One was 21" caught below Lordville in the spring on a #14 Adams and the other was 22" caught on a #16 Rusty spinner below Hancock.

Browns are another story and they are far more common now than they were thirty years ago. Either I've gotten better or they have gotten bigger because back in the 70's & 80's a 20" brown was a great fish on any of the rivers.

While it is exciting to catch 20" and larger trout I'll be more than happy to catch those "waste of time" trout all day long!


He's probably not going to answer. He's been banned for a year or so. Just sayin........


Boyer

Posted on: 2012/8/8 10:19


Re: Steelhead in the Delaware River?

Joined:
2006/10/18 15:46
From Patterson twp, Pa (Beaver Falls)
Posts: 6528
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I believe the term is "band"...

Posted on: 2012/8/8 11:34
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