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Re: Mountain stream tactics

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2006/11/2 8:50
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Quote:

“Hatches, hatches…? I don’t need no stinking hatches”


That's funny! And true. Beginning flyfishers often get so indocrinated by all the matching the hatch propaganda that they have to go through a de-programming phase at some point.

I fish wild trout freestoners a lot, and most of the time I fish dry flies and most of the time there aren't trout rising to a hatch. So most of the time it's "prospecting" with a dry fly, and good old standard patterns work great.

Elk hair caddis and Parachute Adams are two of the best all around patterns. From late spring through summer and fall, terrestrials work very well. Big black ants, beetles, and sinking inchworms.

Nymphs and streamers when the water is cold and the fish won't come up.

Blue Hole Creek doesn't have much of a trout population, I don't think. You need to fish better water than that. Camp Run and Roaring Run hold decent numbers of brookies, or at least they did.

Make a trip this coming season to the NC region: Potter, Tioga, Lycoming, Clinton, Cameron, Elk, northern Centre, etc. Fish the state forests and gamelands in this region.

Posted on: 2007/1/5 9:54


Re: Mountain stream tactics

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2006/12/20 18:08
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I realize this may be in direct violation of flyfishing ethics, but I have some tips that will help you when fishing new mountain streams.
In my opinion the best way to scout new water is without any fishing gear at all. Except for posibly a dozen or two night crawlers ( Don't stop reading I'll explain in a second) When fishing one of these small creeks, you can cover alot more water just by hiking it. I can cover 3-4-5 miles of a small creek in a matter of hours with out a flyrod. However put a flyrod in my hands, and a mile or two of creek will take me all day. The major advantage of this is finding the most productive water. Very often small creeks will be good in some sections and not good in others. for example. I have a creek very close to where I live that is about 4 miles in length. for the first mile and a half is almost barren, few holes and even fewer fish. however a mile back off the beaten path and there are 6 and 7 foot and deeper holes , and 9-10inch broookies and 12-15inch brownies are numerous in every hole. The way I found these fish is to take a dozen night crawlers and just walk the entire creek without a rod. every couple 100 yards, or a nice pool I would throw one in and see if anything came out to grab it. For the first mile or so every night crawler I through in drifted through the middle of the pool with out so much as a look. but then the farther I got the more fish I began to see come up and eat the night crawler. I could then tell which holes held fish and which ones didn't. (also which creeks have fish and which ones don't.) But if I never would have done that, I never would have gotten into the top 3 miles of the creek. I would have just fished my way up the bottem mile or so and write the creek off as having no trout, instead of being my favorite creek. Also seeing a couple 9inch brookies or a big brown come up and eat a night crawler really gives you some energy to walk the mile or 2 that it takes to get back into some of the better sections of creeks. Also scout the map for small tributaries flowing into the stream. a 6inch wide trickle feeding into a stream will usually make the section of creek (a couple holes) upstream and a couple of holes down stream more productive than stretches in between these little feeder trickles.
Just a technique I use on little streams sometimes. THis way you know the biggest and best holes of a creek along with having the faith in that creek having fish.

Just something a little different~ 5footfenwick

Posted on: 2007/1/5 15:03


Re: Mountain stream tactics

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2007/1/4 11:38
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I'm going to explore a small stream about 4 miles up and over a steep mountain tomorrow. It's a little wider than 7 feet with some nice pools. My dad caught a 13 inch native brookie there ~40 years ago, and I'm hoping there are still some trout in it. Oughta be a nice day tomorrow, weather.com says a high of 65 for my area.

Posted on: 2007/1/5 21:55


Re: Mountain stream tactics

Joined:
2006/10/2 10:08
From Westmoreland County (near fairgrounds)
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RyanH,

Check your PM.

Give me a call today and maybe we can hook-up.

Looks like a gorgeous day in the Laurel Highlands!

Posted on: 2007/1/6 9:51
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Re: Mountain stream tactics
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2006/9/9 9:29
From Monessen, PA
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I went with Ryan to a local Class A where I was sure we'd see some fish. He used everyone's advice and broke his streak of bad luck. Here are a couple shots of him keeping a low profile:

Attach file:



jpg  Rhcamp1.jpg (0.00 KB)


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12_45a19eec4022f.jpg X px

Posted on: 2007/1/7 20:31
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Re: Mountain stream tactics

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2006/9/9 22:43
From Delaware Co.
Posts: 3480
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I wish I had wild trout streams, to fish like that around my way those pics look great Jack...

Posted on: 2007/1/8 3:57


Re: Mountain stream tactics

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2006/9/13 12:37
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Bamboozle is right, you don't need no stinking hatches. and even on Class A oftentimes the best water is a fair walk in. There have been man times that I've fished streams and had only fair fishing until I was in over a mile, you're still fairly young do some walking and you will find good water where there will be trout. Of course they are a bit harder to find this time of the year, but if you know where to look you'll find them. I like the worming idea, I never though of that, but once in a while I fish with bait anglers and they don't have any trouble finding trout when they toss a worm in a hole.

Posted on: 2007/1/8 9:00


Re: Mountain stream tactics

Joined:
2006/9/12 12:07
From Berryville Virginia
Posts: 329
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I think you have some excellent comments and approaches to fishing on small Mt. Streams. With out getting into short rods vs long rods. The most important thing for me is the rod has to cast the leader only. I fish most of the Mt. Streams in the summer and only fish dries. Low water is the main reason. But if the water is up and I have no luck on the top a killer fly for me is a red tag you may want to have a few with you next time.


Joe E

Posted on: 2007/1/9 8:30


Re: Mountain stream tactics

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2006/9/9 16:33
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Short rod vs Long rod.
I had a 7 1/2 footer, Jack had a 9 footer. One the walk in I thought I was so smart because I was NEARLY tangle free. However once on the water (as you could see in the pics) I had to leeeeeean all the way out to get my fly over the spot. If I had an extra foot and a half I would not have had to look like a moron kneeling beside a crick. The wind did a fair job at killing what little reach I did have.

Posted on: 2007/1/9 9:15


Re: Mountain stream tactics

Joined:
2006/9/11 15:34
From Blair County
Posts: 73
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I usually fish a 6 1/2 foot on small streams and sometimes my 7ft bamboo.. I feel that anything longer thna that is not needed . I fish up stream directly the whole time . I get some long cast out for a mtn stream . lots of bow and arrow , and of course roll ... I use a 6ft leader . And last the only fly I use for native brookies is a Royal Wulff with yellow wings .. no nymphs it takes the challenge out of it . THats my style , but to each his own !!!!

Posted on: 2007/1/9 9:33
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Re: Mountain stream tactics

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2006/12/7 18:13
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Another vote for the short sticks on what I consider to be small cricks. I'm talking about the overgrown variety with lots of trees just waiting to snag my fly on the last backcast.

I go with a 6'6" or 7'0" most of the time but I have a 5'6" in the design stages. Material of choice is bamboo or glass. I'll trade reach for not getting snagged in tree limbs. It works for me.

But if you also consider Slate Run a mountain stream, there my short rod goes out the window since there is so much room for backcasts in places. There I use an 8'0" - 8'6" rod.

Posted on: 2007/1/9 10:50


Re: Mountain stream tactics

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2006/12/13 9:28
From Other side of the tracks
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My small stream rod used to be a 6'6" cheap rod, but I gave it away. Now I use an 8 footer. I used to be sold on the shorter rods, but now I am not so sure. They have their pluses and minuses. I plan to build another shorty. My thinking is that in streams where you really can't cast much, longer can be an advantage because all you have to do is reach. anyone remember Dave (Cave) Curran (sp)? He used a 9 footer for small streams. by the way, is he still in the Coast Guard up in alaska? Anyway, my feeling is that if you can get fair casting lanes, shorter helps keep me out of the overhead trees. But then ... with a shorter rod, you need to have more line out so you need a longer lane. Heck, I don't know which is better. depends on the crick I guess. Most of the ones I fish don't have much brush, but do have a lot of hemlock overhead, so shorther is probably a little better IMHO.

Posted on: 2007/1/9 11:15
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Re: Mountain stream tactics
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2006/9/9 9:29
From Monessen, PA
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If I ever build a rod specifically for brookie streams, I think 7'9" would be ideal for me. You can always choke up on a longer rod-- casting with your hand on the blank above the cork-- but when needed, it is impossible to "choke down" on a short rod.

Posted on: 2007/1/9 11:34
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Re: Mountain stream tactics

Joined:
2006/9/12 12:07
From Berryville Virginia
Posts: 329
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I use rods in length from 4’4” to 7’9” for Mt. Streams there is only one material of choice for me and that is bamboo. The rod I take most is a 6’3” 4wt for the streams I fish most of the time. I like to cast so the shorter rod allows me to do that and I still end up bow and arrow casting a lot. The 4’4” is not a toy; some of the really tight streams it comes in very handy. I actually gave the rod to a friend that loved it and I plan to make me another soon.

Bamboozle what taper is your 5’6” based on. I’m in the process of building a 5’10” quad (It is final tapered I just need to glue it up, but was waiting to finish a couple others that I’m working on and glue them all at one time) that I converted from a lee wulff taper. It looks good on paper I hope it casts well if not it will be back to the pen and paper and see where I need to make changes.


Joe E

Posted on: 2007/1/9 12:00


Re: Mountain stream tactics

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2006/11/2 8:50
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Quote:

JackM wrote:
If I ever build a rod specifically for brookie streams, I think 7'9" would be ideal for me. You can always choke up on a longer rod-- casting with your hand on the blank above the cork-- but when needed, it is impossible to "choke down" on a short rod.


I've cast a friend's 7' 9" Orvis rod and it is very nice for this type of fishing. It was a 5 wt, if I recall correctly.

I have a 7 1/2 foot 4 wt Redington rod, which has a medium action, and it is pretty good for this type of fishing.

But there are many times when I feel it doesn't have enough punch. I've been thinking the ideal rod for a lot of these streams might be an 8 ft, 4 wt., fast action.

I'd like the Loomis action, without the Loomis cost. A real rocket, in other words. If anybody knows of any good rods like this, that wouldn't break the bank, please let me know.

Posted on: 2007/1/9 13:04



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