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Re: Fishing access: A story of people, property and profits

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2010/8/4 11:18
Posts: 108
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Regarding the DSR, it is a total joke. I wouldn't pay a dime to fish there. There are plenty of spots in the pubic sr areas you can catch bright fish. Its a function of timing and walking. The fly zones are filled with wannabes and the dsr is way worse. With that being said i fish the sr often because i live close and its very easy to catch fish and it very rarely blows out. If i was coming from out of town to ny to fish for salmon/steelhead/browns, the sr would be 5th or 6th on my list.

Posted on: 2013/3/5 21:30


Re: Fishing access: A story of people, property and profits

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2006/9/9 15:10
From Bucks County or Bridgeville
Posts: 122
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Quote:


Quote:
And you do not have control over management rights on your land. If the fish and game commissions want to make your land no fishing or no hunting, they have every right to do so.


Based on everything I am aware of, they have ZERO right to tell me what I can and can't do on my property. In fact the laws even say a person can fish on their own property without a license.

I get where you are coming from but this appears to be your opinion and not the law. If otherwise, please cite references.


Nursery waters in Erie

Posted on: 2013/3/6 18:14


Re: Fishing access: A story of people, property and profits

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2009/7/29 10:25
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not a comment on the comments above, but going back to the original linked article, it says there's a "trend toward making all the best parts of the world the sole domain of the wealthy."

isnt that a little bit much? I grew up in Ohio, and am often impressed at the amount of public land in PA. I know nothing about steelhead or the Little J, but at least on the small to medium stream side of things, I think that if you look around and ask around you can find a lot of excellent wild trout water to fish in the state with just gas money and hiking. Including some private land owners who will let you fish.

the original article also bashes the DEP and PFBC for "selling out" over getting some gas rights money... and then gives links to articles about D Beaver and how he was sued and stopped by on the little J by... the DEP & PFBC. ?

I know of several good stretches of small stream, wild trout water that have recently been acquired by the state - just in the last few years. I found these by reading public things from the state, or noticing changes in posted SGL borders or state forest borders and contacting state people who sent me maps and have been unfailingly polite and helpful.

this private land issue at least on small streams can be a "grass is greener" effect. .. ... I cant fish pohoqualine's water, or some broadhead club's water. but a) they preserved it, good for them, and helped entire watersheds in the process, and b) I don't assume that I can't find fishing as good or better if I just work at it.






Posted on: 2013/3/7 6:45


Re: Fishing access: A story of people, property and profits

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2006/9/13 10:18
From LV
Posts: 7735
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I'll bet if you looked it up the Salmon River is navagible

Posted on: 2013/3/7 16:11


Re: Fishing access: A story of people, property and profits

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2011/7/6 12:30
From Ephrata, PA
Posts: 6504
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Is the navagible law a state by state law, or federal one?

Posted on: 2013/3/7 16:20


Re: Fishing access: A story of people, property and profits

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2006/9/13 10:18
From LV
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State By State, but I believe there is a Federal Listing too.

Posted on: 2013/3/7 16:34
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Re: Fishing access: A story of people, property and profits

Joined:
2012/8/24 16:03
From Philly
Posts: 145
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This reminds me of a thread asking if fly fishermen were elitists. I'd point to these clubs as proof that we are. I try to give people the benefit of the doubt, but sometimes it's not that easy.

My grandfather went in on a piece of land with some fellow vets when he got home from WWII. The lots were up against a mountain with state game lands and our camp hunted there for 50 years. Then some guys got themselves a lease and cut off the access... so there's a nice strip of "public" land that is for all intents and purposes inaccessible to the public.

I can't be convinced that it's fair to rope off a section of land or water that's subsidized with public license fees for the benefit of a few guys with a lot of money regardless of how hard they worked for it. Calling it a surrogate for class warfare is a weak argument at best, and it's more the pot calling the kettle black then anything else.

I hear a lot of "it is what it is" arguments from my retired friends, but that doesn't work for me because I feel a duty to stick up for my buddies kids who may or may not be blessed with the means to build up a disposable income of tens of thousands of dollars to put toward fishing the few remaining areas where fish have a chance to exist without us putting them there two or three times a year.

As far as private clubs doing what is best for the area I think that's debatable. Like any organization, TU included, they do what's best for their major stake holders as long as it resembles their mission statement.

So here I am pondering my own statements, do I think the public should have access to real fisheries? yup. Do I think the majority of the public will leave it in the same condition as they found it? nope. Does that make me an elitist? probably. Do I think that a group with a lot of money is better suited for stewardship? not necessarily. Are these clubs buying up access rights to keep me and you out? absolutely.


Posted on: 2013/3/9 3:17


Re: Fishing access: A story of people, property and profits

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2009/5/29 6:40
From harlansburg
Posts: 4456
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I wouldn't group all flyfishers as elitists because a small minority of them belong to private clubs. those that belong to these clubs are the same wealthy few that belong to private golf, tennis, etc, clubs.
It the same as saying all motorcycle riders are like the hells angels, which while yes, they do ride motorcycles, are nothing more than organized crime, far from being motorcyclists. Not saying private fishing clubs are organized crime(maybe?!), just saying those that belong represent such a small minority of flyfishing folks.
that said, I believe it is DEAD WRONG to use public waters for private use and profit, NO MATTER THE REASON, be it fishing club, gas company use, etc.
but of course, money talks, and the regular folk like us get to walk.

Posted on: 2013/3/9 6:41


Re: Fishing access: A story of people, property and profits

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2010/5/1 9:10
From NE OH
Posts: 1305
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Quote:

bikerfish wrote:
I wouldn't group all flyfishers as elitists because a small minority of them belong to private clubs. those that belong to these clubs are the same wealthy few that belong to private golf, tennis, etc, clubs.
It the same as saying all motorcycle riders are like the hells angels, which while yes, they do ride motorcycles, are nothing more than organized crime, far from being motorcyclists. Not saying private fishing clubs are organized crime(maybe?!), just saying those that belong represent such a small minority of flyfishing folks.
that said, I believe it is DEAD WRONG to use public waters for private use and profit, NO MATTER THE REASON, be it fishing club, gas company use, etc.
but of course, money talks, and the regular folk like us get to walk.


Are you saying you're a member of Hell's Angels?

Posted on: 2013/3/9 10:50
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"You don't need 7x. All right, 7x...now you're just being stupid. That's ridiculous. You know what else...throw away the 6x, because that's garbage too." -Hank Patterson


Re: Fishing access: A story of people, property and profits

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2012/10/24 19:22
From Landenberg, PA
Posts: 1633
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A simple solution is for the state to value properties with posted land on migratory streams to have a much higher value than those with non posted land - to financially compensate the state for the provision of stocks.

The state can then use those funds to purchase public land elsewhere and stock other streams.

Which may seem unfair to the property owners or clubs - but if the state stopped stocking, within 5 years their properties would be worth half I reckon.

They can't have it both ways IMHO.

Posted on: 2013/3/9 11:12
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nowhere is so sweet, as the bosom of the vale where the bright waters meet.


Re: Fishing access: A story of people, property and profits

Joined:
2012/10/24 19:22
From Landenberg, PA
Posts: 1633
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Oh, I should add that $45 a day for steelhead is a bargain.

I have no.problems with landowners charging a small fee for access and up keep, not to.mention liability insurance.

I just tweeted greg senyo btw to get the 411 - his web page says he is committed to retaining public access....

Posted on: 2013/3/9 11:23

Edited by geebee on 2013/3/9 11:54:31
_________________
nowhere is so sweet, as the bosom of the vale where the bright waters meet.



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