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Dry Fly Question

Joined:
2012/6/5 21:59
From Banshee
Posts: 282
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Is it worth fishing dry flies to non rising trout? I was out Sun to my local stream. I saw a few sulphers but no trout were rising anywhere. So I spend an hour fishing a sulpher on top with no takers at all. Was I just wasting my time with no trout looking at the surface? I switched to a beaded mayfly nymph and caught 6 in a hour.

Posted on: 2013/6/5 13:54


Re: Dry Fly Question

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2008/6/14 23:22
From Central, PA
Posts: 758
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It's hard as it is fishing in the sun to catch anything let alone on a dry in the sun. They usually feed more whn the sun gets off the stream or in the shade Nymphs usually always is your best chance to get trout in the runs.

Posted on: 2013/6/5 14:04


Re: Dry Fly Question

Joined:
2006/9/9 0:19
From philadelphia
Posts: 169
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YES

I have many times in the past been able to lure fish to my dry fly when it SEEMS nothing is rising and nothing else is attracting fish ie. nymphs ,streamers, emergers terrestials. I mean nothing.
But on many occasions I have been able to LURE fish to the surface while persistently presenting a dry fly in lanes I feel a fish are. Not a lot of fish but I have got them to come up.
Flies: Adams Adams,parachute, Royal Wulff, Gray Dun patterns, Big Brown MAy fly PAtterns I just keep trying. And then all of a suddenBANG.

Posted on: 2013/6/5 17:02


Re: Dry Fly Question

Joined:
2006/9/13 10:18
From LV
Posts: 7633
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It depends on the stream, I fish dries all the time on freestone streams, because these streams are generally infertile and have fewer opportunities for trout to feed, trout usually smash the flies drifting on the surface.
Limestone streams are very different, but this time of the year terrestrials do work pretty well when you don't see any hatch activity.

Posted on: 2013/6/5 17:06


Re: Dry Fly Question

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2011/5/26 10:12
From Dauphin PA
Posts: 2766
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Sure. In the faster water you can usually get a few to slash at your offering.

Posted on: 2013/6/5 17:18
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Re: Dry Fly Question

Joined:
2010/6/26 11:19
From Along the Lehigh Above the Gap
Posts: 7117
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Dry dropper best of both worlds.

Posted on: 2013/6/5 17:41
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Re: Dry Fly Question

Joined:
2012/6/5 21:59
From Banshee
Posts: 282
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I'll keep trying, I love the action on top. I Had a wd 40 as a dropper but no takers there either.

Posted on: 2013/6/5 17:47


Re: Dry Fly Question

Joined:
2009/9/9 14:52
From Bel Air, MD
Posts: 703
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I usually nymph or fish soft hackles, so I don't fish dries very often. Sometimes I will just practice and work on my drift and presentation. One morning on the Gunpowder, I was working on a nice deep run - the Hemlock Pool for the Gunpowder guys on the board - casting a CDC caddis. The water was so clear, I was able to take two fish in about 5 casts, and was able to watch them rise, saw the white of their mouths open, and waited for the head turn before I set the hook. Very cool.

I think, in general, most streams have some bugs on it most of the time, so the fish will look up. On the Gunpowder, caddis in the morning is always a safe bet, even if nothing is rising.


Posted on: 2013/6/5 22:34


Re: Dry Fly Question

Joined:
2006/9/21 0:02
From Pittsburgh
Posts: 4277
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Non hatch periods are the time to fish terrestrials IMO. I have caught many fish on them during these slow times.
And, as a happy coincidence - the best time to fish terrestrials, is during warm sunny afternoons IMO

Posted on: 2013/6/6 0:44


Re: Dry Fly Question

Joined:
2009/9/24 15:02
From Montgomery County
Posts: 1585
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You can, but I wouldn't try to match a hatch if there are no risers to the naturals. Give them somehting different or employ some action to your fly.

I'd say you made theright call by fishing nymphs

Posted on: 2013/6/6 11:24


Re: Dry Fly Question

Joined:
2008/1/31 17:19
From Pretty much everywhere at some point, Thorndale today.
Posts: 13453
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Yes, it very much depends on the stream.

On an infertile brookie stream, for instance, fishing to non-risers is the NORM, not the exception. And you can rack up huge numbers like that. They're down there looking up and feeding on top, it's just that there's not very many bugs. Perhaps one only comes by every hour or two. The chances of seeing a natural rise in the 3 minutes your are there are slim.

On richer streams, sometimes they're just hunkered down, not feeding at all. Sometimes they're focused on something underneath. Sometimes the water is too high or off color to see anything on top. In these cases, no, you should not fish a dry. And as often as not, if you don't see fishing rising at all, this is the case.

But there are times where prospecting with dries can be productve. I do this under bushes and such with terrestrials. I also, on occasion, skate stoneflies or caddis around likely looking areas. Often these fish do rise if you watch long enough, it's just sporadic. So, if watching around, and you're seeing what seems like random, very sporadic rises, give it a try. They're looking up and being opportunistic, but meals are occasional. Don't just fish to the rises you saw, also fish other likely looking water. They're there too, you just weren't looking at the right moment...

Posted on: 2013/6/6 11:31


Re: Dry Fly Question

Joined:
2006/11/20 10:08
Posts: 1209
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Chaz and pcray seem to have it about right. I particularly enjoy "fishing the water" with attractor dry flies in the absence of hatching flies on freestone streams.
Of interest: In his wonderful book "The Lure and Lore of Trout Fishing," Dr. Alvin Grove called freestone streams dry-fly streams and spring creeks wet-fly streams.

Posted on: 2013/6/6 13:14


Re: Dry Fly Question

Joined:
2012/6/5 21:59
From Banshee
Posts: 282
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Thanks, good stuff

Posted on: 2013/6/6 13:32


Re: Dry Fly Question

Joined:
2006/9/13 18:28
From chester ct
Posts: 511
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las - in some situations, eg Cairn's Pool on the Beaverkill, locals call hammering a single spot with one fly 'pounding them up'. Gearge LaBranche wrote about creating a hatch in this way. Maybe stockies respond to this better than the warier wild trouts.

If you have located a trout in a feeding position, but one that hasn't come up yet, you can 'condition' the fish. The late Charlie wrote in a New England mag about this after I did this for him in a March Brown hatch, when the flies were still starting to emerge. I ran a conventional Catskill MB over him a few times, then gave Charlie one of my MB emergers and then gave him my spot. He got the 17" good 'n proper, except that his rod broke while landing it, which he did anyway. I figured I conditioned the brute to thinking March Browns with my dry.

Another method is to do a switchup once the trout takes a shot at your fly but misses.

tl
les

hp
les

Posted on: 2013/6/9 13:23
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tl
les


Re: Dry Fly Question

Joined:
2012/3/14 23:03
Posts: 314
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Always have some griffith's gnats in 16,18,20. You can catch some BIG fish on this fly all year.

Posted on: 2013/6/9 16:47






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