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Re: A few interesting words on ticks

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2006/9/10 16:07
From Pine Grove
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Quote:

littlejuniata wrote:
Never a worry about ticks as a kid, are ticks a recent problem? If so where did they come from?


My buddy and i were just saying the same thing the other day. Neither of us ever actually saw a tick until we were in our 20's and we spent quite a bit of time in the woods, usually camping without a tent. Now we go into the same woods and have to stop every 5 minutes or so to flick a few off of our waders. We decided there must have been some sort of predation that has since declined, but what do we know?

Boyer

Posted on: 2009/6/6 13:18


Re: A few interesting words on ticks

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2009/5/8 23:25
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It's all about the deer. Tick populations are tightly correlated with deer populations. Either there are way more deer than hunters love to claim, housing developments are making it easier for deer to evade hunters, less hunters, all of the above, or some other reason, but the answer lies with the deer I feel in some primary way. Ticks need them as a big meal for the eggs.

Posted on: 2009/6/6 14:26


Re: A few interesting words on ticks

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From Pine Grove
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Quote:

Brownout wrote:
It's all about the deer. Tick populations are tightly correlated with deer populations. Either there are way more deer than hunters love to claim, housing developments are making it easier for deer to evade hunters, less hunters, all of the above, or some other reason, but the answer lies with the deer I feel in some primary way. Ticks need them as a big meal for the eggs.


A few of the areas I'm talking about are almost devoid of deer these days as compared to when we were younger, that was the part that baffled us. The turkey and grouse populations in that area have soared since the removal of the deer, so I can't help but wonder if there is some other kind of insect that had previously eaten ticks that are no longer there in similar numbers. Also, almost all of the areas where we have seen this have marten boxes in them, so I was thinking that the ticks had a predator that is a primary food source for turkey, grouse, and marten and the return of the birds has given the ticks some respite. Maybe we'll never know, but dang I hate ticks.

Boyer

Edit: I just googled "tick predators" and the first page I found said that wild turkey are the single biggest predator of ticks in North America. So much for that theory. Thank goodness the turkeys are around!

Posted on: 2009/6/7 14:14


Re: A few interesting words on ticks

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2006/9/11 13:05
From Lewistown
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Maybe it works in reverse... No deer they must find another food source --- us.

Posted on: 2009/6/7 14:29
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Re: A few interesting words on ticks

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I think deer tick populations are highly correlated to deer populations. Most of the ticks I am getting on me are dog ticks, which are bigger, and easier to spot.

Maybe that is the case with yourself as well, you are seeing dog ticks. I think small game hunting is down across the state, and dog ticks love all rodents. I am not a hunter, but I have heard that hares come in cycles of 7 years or so. Maybe we are at the peak of the rabbit cycle.

I think that tick populations also respond positively to moisture, but I am not sure if it is in the current year or years prior. We've had a lot of rain in the late spring. Haha, who knows. Maybe I should tie some ticks up for brook trout streams.

Posted on: 2009/6/7 16:29


Re: A few interesting words on ticks

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2007/2/20 0:36
From Barto PA
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Although deer are one of the hosts for " deer ticks", hence the name, the white footed mouse is the primary host and spreader of the little devils. The deer kind of get a bad rap. There are a whole lot more white footed mice out there than deer and they are everywhere, including in many houses. Therefor, you don't even need to venture outside to contract Lyme disease.

Posted on: 2009/6/8 4:58


Re: A few interesting words on ticks

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2006/9/10 16:07
From Pine Grove
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Quote:

Brownout wrote:
I think deer tick populations are highly correlated to deer populations. Most of the ticks I am getting on me are dog ticks, which are bigger, and easier to spot.


I should also ad that 95 percent of the ticks we've been seeing are dog ticks, although maybe we're crawling with deer ticks but just not seeing them.

Boyer

Posted on: 2009/6/8 8:03


Re: A few interesting words on ticks

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2009/5/12 12:34
From Bedford County
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Could the 'rise' in tick population be contributed to, what seems to be, warmer winters? Hmmm...Chaz just said about cold water not effecting them...maybe the cold isn't even a factor!

Posted on: 2009/6/8 12:52
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Re: A few interesting words on ticks

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2007/5/11 21:03
From Media, PA
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I live in a residential area of Southeast PA that is loaded with deer and infested with deer ticks. I have been diagnosed with Lyme and treated for it on at least a couple of occasions. I have to agree with the above statement about the relation of deer ticks to the no. of deer. Since I am frequently removing tick that have attached themselves to me I will share this. Use a long nosed hackle pliers. Keep one in the bathroom, or where you can get to it easily. Attach to the tick and slowly turn counterclockwise. Then dab the area with rubbing alcohol. I find the highest number during "Indian" summer, especially when raking and moving leaves.

Posted on: 2009/6/8 14:10


Re: A few interesting words on ticks

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2009/5/8 23:25
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RRR,

I think they get the disease from the mouse in the first place and then they can feed off of them. But, there is a reason that deer get a bad rap, when they start killing them, the tick populations drop pretty significantly. This is from Wikipedia, when you search tick, the citations are there, hyperlinked.

The blacklegged or deer tick (Ixodes scapularis) is dependent on the white-tailed deer for reproduction. Larval and nymph stages (immature ticks that cannot reproduce) of the deer tick feed on birds and small mammals. The adult female tick needs a large 3 day blood meal from the deer before she can reproduce and lay her 2000 or more eggs. Deer are the primary host for the adult deer tick and are key to the reproductive success of the tick.[4][citation needed] See the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station and Connecticut Department of Public Health joint publication "Tick Management Handbook" for more details of the tick's life cycle and dependence on deer.[5]

Numerous studies have shown that abundance and distribution of deer ticks are correlated with deer densities.[4][6][7][8]

When the deer population was reduced by 74% at a 248-acre (100 ha) study site in Bridgeport, Connecticut, for example, the number of nymphal ticks collected at the site decreased by 92%.[4] The relationship between deer abundance, tick abundance, and human cases of Lyme disease was well documented in the Mumford Cove Community in Groton, Connecticut, from 1996 to 2004. The deer population in Mumford Cove was reduced from about 77 deer per square mile to about 10 deer per square mile (4 deer per square kilometer) after 2 years of controlled hunting. After the initial reduction the deer population was maintained at low levels. Reducing deer densities to 10 deer per square mile (4 deer per square kilometer) was adequate to reduce by more than 90% the risk of humans contracting Lyme disease in Mumford Cove.[9] Deer population management must serve as the main tool in any long-term strategy to reduce human incidences of Lyme disease.[10]

Posted on: 2009/6/8 16:06


Re: A few interesting words on ticks

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2009/1/3 13:51
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Ticks were uncommon in PA 30 years ago. Deer were more abundant.
The South had ticks then.
What has changed?

Suggestions: Milder winters; change in transportation routes (used to be lot of upper Midwest to East, now lots of South to North.); changes in wildlife community populations and species; increased travel by individuals from South to North.

My older setter (12) was diagnosed with Lyme four years ago and given two years to live. He's in poor shape, but still alive. Didn't take him out at all last year, but hunting in Dauphin, Lebanon, Lancaster, Schuylkill counties, no fewer than 50 ticks pulled off him (most dead or dying from Frontline; he got Lyme and lots of live ticks when I tried the Bayer product) each trip the past 6 years. I don't seem to get them on me as much as others I hunt with, but get lots on my brush pants.
They really make hunting early season small game miserable.
Grouse and woodcock cover is also deer cover and frequently is brook trout areas.

The only thing that confuses me - Lyme Disease is so fatal (renal failure eventually) to dogs, why don't the coyotes seem affected?
Or are they?

I tend to wade shallow and the stream edge to avoid them when fishing, and avoid crossing meander thickets now.

There is a product that is kind of hard to find that I want to try to get in the near future - I think it's called Rhino skin - basically a skin tight long-john type of full-length breathable underwear developed for preventing tick bites in the warmer more traditional tick areas of U.S.

Anybody try it?

Posted on: 2009/6/8 19:38


Re: A few interesting words on ticks

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2009/5/8 23:25
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I think there is a vaccine for lyme for dogs. Humans: they had one, it was pulled because they said there was not enough demand.

Posted on: 2009/6/8 20:55


Re: A few interesting words on ticks

Joined:
2006/9/13 10:18
From LV
Posts: 7884
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In my neck of the woods there are more deer than white footed mice.

Posted on: 2009/6/9 19:38
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Re: A few interesting words on ticks

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2009/1/3 13:51
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Quick note: I mispelled the product name.
It's rynoskin.
http://www.rynoskin.com/

Posted on: 2009/6/11 10:04



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