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Re: 30" Browns

Joined:
2013/5/15 10:50
From PA
Posts: 55
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The last two posts about large browns in the rivers are spot on. The same can be said about the lower, warmer sections of some trout streams. Low trout numbers, but trout of large size.

Posted on: 2013/11/4 22:43


Re: 30" Browns

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2013/9/6 11:40
From Hunker
Posts: 193
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Don't forget the Yough, I've seen plenty of browns in the upper 20" inches that came from float trips down to Ohiopyle through that 8 mile section of trophy trout waters. That is where I'd fish for a 30" brown with the water temps staying in the 50-60s all year round. Very nice water, and still have yet to take a float trip.

Posted on: 2013/11/5 0:59
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Re: 30" Browns

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2010/8/12 17:05
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I recently caught one when that was easily 24 and probably pushing 30. I didn't have a tape measure and luckily railking was out fishing with me and was able to help me net the thing and get a few pics.


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Posted on: 2013/11/5 4:03


Re: 30" Browns

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2010/6/26 11:19
From Along the Lehigh Above the Gap
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Well I hope you kept that one to eat. It was not surviving if you released it

Posted on: 2013/11/5 6:31
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Re: 30" Browns

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2011/7/6 12:30
From Ephrata, PA
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What do you mean, Becks? You mean I can't throw you around by your lungs!?

Posted on: 2013/11/5 8:22


Re: 30" Browns

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2011/3/6 0:34
From Dauphin
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That is some of the worst fish management I have ever seen. Lol

Posted on: 2013/11/5 8:56
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Re: 30" Browns

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2008/1/31 17:19
From Pretty much everywhere at some point, Thorndale today.
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While I don't support the way it looks to have been handled, that is a monster, and I wouldn't be shocked if it was released and lived. Monsters like that are a lot hardier than your run of the mill 10 incher. I've kept a steelhead or two before that have been on a rope for a few hours and, to me, looked like they could be released and survive!

That's a monster, though.

Posted on: 2013/11/5 8:58


Re: 30" Browns

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2012/9/4 10:44
From Pittsburgh, PA
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I have yet to catch anything over 27" in 20 years of fly fishing for trout (besides Steelhead). I have hooked a cutthroat, rainbow, and brown pushing 30"+ but failed to land any of them. Fine tippits in gin clear water typically make for a low success rate.

However, I have seen many fish in the 30" class. Rainbows easily pushing 30" cruising the flats of Trout Lake and the Harrimans Ranch section of the Henry's Fork, as well as in Nelsons Spring Creek.

The Cutthroat I referenced above I hooked in the second meadow of Slough Creek about 10 years ago. On the Housatonic, in CT, I had a 30"+ Brown eat an 8" trout right off of my hook at my ankles, scared the crap out of me.

I havent ever really fished after dark and thats when these big boys play. They are definitely out there...

Posted on: 2013/11/5 9:09


Re: 30" Browns

Joined:
2013/2/12 12:31
From Camp Hill, PA
Posts: 505
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The photo I posted of a 32.5" brown was from the Yellow Breeches Outfitters cork board and caught in Big Spring Creek. It was caught in 2012. A published report was in the publication "Mid Atlantic Fly Fishing Guide", April 2012.

The 28.5" brown I caught and posted, was caught/released in the Conodoguinet near Carlisle. It has similar markings/coloration to the Big Spring 32.5"er.

Large fish are in both confined streams (ones with blocked paths...dams, that do not offer free migration) and the waters that allow movement from headwaters out to larger rivers.

I am convinced that the fish I catch are from both the CV limestoners and the Susquehanna (and its northern tributaries). There are, with out doubt, pods of fish that migrate seasonally.

Hatchery fish also can be in the mix. The Rainbow I have as an avatar was a Hatchery Breeder that I caught in the Yellow Breeches...24"er with clipped dorsal fin and very warn other fins. I have heard of the release of a stocked 27"er at Allenberry in the past.

Like several of you, who profess your obsession to hunting large trout...I too am possessed. I too, measure and keep a record. Twenty inches and over get a mention. There have been many. A handful were caught two times more than a year later.

Post Spawn Winter Fishing Rules!

Posted on: 2013/11/5 9:55


Re: 30" Browns

Joined:
2006/10/18 15:46
From Patterson twp, Pa (Beaver Falls)
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Quote:

SBecker wrote:
Well I hope you kept that one to eat. It was not surviving if you released it



I think we go a bit overboard with some lesser fish management issues like this. I really doubt that touching a fish's gills, or having them on a dry rock, or other issues is 100% going to kill a fish. Yes it isn't a good practice and sometimes I'm glad that pictures like this are posted so it gets the word out to others reading that this is not an acceptable way to handle a fish if you plan on catch and releasing a fish. But I really don't think all of these fish die that are handled poorly. You can get punched in the eye, stuck with a needle or even a worse injury and not die, so why should these fish die from mishandling for a minute or so? I agree that they should be handled with care, but the whole "That fish is belly up now" is sometimes overblown IMO.

To properly hold a fish of this size you should hold it around it's tail with one hand and cradle it under it's belly with the other. Keep it in the water and lift it out just in time to take a quick picture. Do not wave it back and forth in the water as that will push water backwards through it's gills, but simply hold it in the water facing the current so the water naturally flows the correct way through it's gills until it has enough strength to swim off on it's own.

Posted on: 2013/11/5 10:09
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Re: 30" Browns

Joined:
2010/6/26 11:19
From Along the Lehigh Above the Gap
Posts: 7085
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Quote:

ryguyfi wrote:
Quote:

SBecker wrote:
Well I hope you kept that one to eat. It was not surviving if you released it



But I really don't think all of these fish die that are handled poorly. You can get punched in the eye, stuck with a needle or even a worse injury and not die, so why should these fish die from mishandling for a minute or so? I agree that they should be handled with care, but the whole "That fish is belly up now" is sometimes overblown IMO.


Ryan,

I agree with you to a point. However, as Squatchy states: Let me literally put my hand down your throat and grab your lungs. Hold you by your lungs for a minute or so, and I guarantee there is some major damage done. This and we are hardier then fish. To compare what you see in that photo’s to a punch in the eye and a LO FREAKIN L needle is ridiculous and I feel you need to retract that comment. Additionally, we have medical care and doctors. Let me know when you run into a nurse shark on a freestoner.

BTW, I do not fault the guy. He probably does not know better, and I really did not try to be mean in my answer. Just wanted to let him know that fish is dead.


Posted on: 2013/11/5 10:16
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"Four of us wolves, running around the desert together, in Las Vegas, looking for strippers and cocaine. So tonight, I make a toast!"

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Re: 30" Browns

Joined:
2013/5/15 10:50
From PA
Posts: 55
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Night Stalker, You sound like a carbon copy of myself with regards to the obsessive pursuit of the big boys. Glad to hear you do well.

Posted on: 2013/11/5 10:24


Re: 30" Browns

Joined:
2011/7/6 12:30
From Ephrata, PA
Posts: 6362
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I think I could start getting into finding the bigger boys. Most of the fish I catch are small, as I fish for natives quite a bit. I wouldn't mind starting to target the big fellers. Seems like a new challenge.

Posted on: 2013/11/5 10:25


Re: 30" Browns

Joined:
2009/6/17 21:49
From United States
Posts: 259
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The Susquehanna and Juniata Rivers have large wild brown trout that utilize them as well. I believe the most realistic chance at a true thirty inch wild brown trout in this state involves one thing. Migration. There is a reason that you don't want to include the lake migrations. Because they produce a disproportionate large amount of the type of fish you seek. When the adult trout finish spawn they leave the area for greener grasses which improve growth rates but also by leaving, allow the YOY to grow without cannibalism.

That class G freestone stream that doesn't produce alot of large trout during the primary fishing months just may surprise you in Fall. I have done alot of walking in the Fall for this reason.
These migrating trout are a moving target and hard to hit. To find them you must cover alot of water or locate them during the spawn. Don't overlook migration. If you want to find the bigger fish during the rest of the season, they just may be in the big creek. As far as night fishing for Big Browns.
Night fishing was born out of necessity, not because it is the only way to catch big browns. But, rather because it is the only way to catch trout staging on cold water awaiting spawn and It just so happens that these are large trout. When trout migrate to the mouths of creeks to survive in the cooler water to await spawn, they will lie in a large pod and not feed during the heat of day, but at night, well that's another story. When the air cools and the sun goes off the water and you have a large group of trout in one concentrated area. Whewee it is on. Makes for a great story about many large trout. However it ends with " The good ole days ". Because our fly fishing predecessors didn't see the problem with taking advantage of this. In all the books I have read regarding fly fishing at night in this state, this is the case.
Unfortunately places like this are not afforded any official protection from the state because the PFBC isn't the only voice in the decision making. So places like this, where the trout may not make that particular stream their residence 365 days a year go unprotected. Frankstown, Conodoguinet for examples. The PFBC stance is that wild browns do a real good job on their own without regulations and I agree. Provided pressure is not applied when they are the most vulnerable. Unregulated fishing pressure. At night.
In short to FIND that thirty incher. Don't rely on luck and the fishing Gods. In the heat of summer they need cold water and in the fall they need good gravel. The water is clear in the fall and go when the sun is high. Big Brown trout are where they want to be. Happy Hunting
I gotta stop. I'm sure that I've expressed enough of my opinions. Just my thoughts and what has worked for me over the last thirty years. I have never broken thirty. Close several times, but no cigar. Some we just never know. Biggest trout I've ever had in my hands was this past season. Big Boy Escaped without a measurement or pic. As it was meant to be, I guess.

Posted on: 2013/11/5 11:16
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I am of the opinion that there is NOT one single population of wild trout that exists in our great state worth intentionally degrading for the benefit of any fisherman or any amount of money no matter how small the population.


Re: 30" Browns

Joined:
2013/5/15 10:50
From PA
Posts: 55
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Stenonema, GREAT post. That was a lot of what I was trying to say, you just worded it better.

The spawn part is the key. The walking miles to find the spots they want to be. It is definitely not a lazy mans game.

What I love though, 11 months out of the year they are elsewhere, but then that one month.......

Posted on: 2013/11/5 11:24



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