Register now on PaFlyFish.com! Login
HOME FORUM BLOG PHOTOS LINKS


Sponsors

Browsing this Thread:   1 Anonymous Users



« 1 (2)


Re: Spinner fall

Joined:
2012/3/14 6:23
From Lancaster
Posts: 1017
Offline
I caught a Green Drake spinner fall last year on Penns in early June. It was awesome. I had planned on fishing well after dark to hopefully have a chance to tie into a nice one but got ran off of the stream by a serious thunderstorm. You really can't appreciate how bright lightning is until you are standing waist deep in the middle of stream such as Penns with a 9' lighting rod in your hand and a bolt lets loose right over you. I was amazed how some of the Penns creek die hards continued to fish as though that was normal. However, spinnerfalls are great to witness whether you catch any fish or not and I will never forget that evening.

Posted on: 2012/4/19 19:47


Re: Spinner fall

Joined:
2010/2/18 8:57
From SW PA
Posts: 750
Offline
I fish the same method as Alby. The except would be I''ll use a floating nymph fished in the film on my point and a Sulpher dun for instance, on a dropper, to keep track of the nymph. Any rise form near the Dry is likely to the floating nymph. Then as the light starts to fade, I'll switch the nymph for a spinner. I think most of the big trout I've taken on dries have come on a spent wind during a spinner fall.

Posted on: 2012/4/19 21:22
_________________
Hatches come and go of their own accord, but work will wait for you to get back.


Re: Spinner fall
Moderator
Joined:
2006/9/9 9:29
From Monessen, PA
Posts: 22412
Offline
This may explain it visually:

Resized Image

As was explained to me some years ago, the trout "learn" very quickly that spent-winged spinners never escape at the last moment. This is why the sips are sips when the trout are on the spent-winged key. I wish I knew how many times I fished the spent-winged spinner pattern while the trout were taking emergers of the same or different species. One of the most frustrating hatch situations is when emergences and spinnerfalls coincide. One trout is on the emergers, the next one on the spinners. Some may even being taking both or either. Thus, I like the dual fly idea Alby suggested.

Posted on: 2012/4/20 8:05

Edited by JackM on 2012/4/20 15:08:30
_________________
Peace, Tony


Re: Spinner fall

Joined:
2011/3/8 19:04
From York, PA
Posts: 369
Offline
This is great information! This kind of knowledge really takes someone like me from getting lucky to getting it right. Thanks!

Posted on: 2012/4/21 9:27


Re: Spinner fall

Joined:
2009/5/29 6:40
From harlansburg
Posts: 4458
Offline
Sas, anytime your fishing in the evening along a stream, look skyward, if a spinnerfall is gonna happen, the air will be full of bugs, sometimes up towards the treetops.
of course, at times they will get very close to the water, then the wind will pick up, it may rain, or some other cosmic event will take place and they will simply vanish.
but if they stay and hit the water, it gets very, very, good!
plus, spinners are one of the easiest bugs to tie! we had to tie up some bigger ones this past weekend at penns while eating breakfast. we had some rusty spinners for a hendricksons, but there were also march browns in the mix, so we tied up some #10 rusty spinners, which worked like a charm the next evening.

Posted on: 2012/4/24 7:13


Re: Spinner fall

Joined:
2008/1/31 17:19
From Pretty much everywhere at some point, Thorndale today.
Posts: 13556
Offline
They can be tough to see in the evening sky too. Drakes are usually obvious. Tricos are usually obvious because they're in massive clouds and pretty close to the water. But most other species are pretty tough, gotta get the right angle with the sun and the trees. It's almost like you gotta get a more experienced person to point em out. Once. After that your head will be peeled on the treetops every evening and you know what to look for.

As far as timing it, IF it occurs in daylight, it can be pretty easy. When you first notice the balls of spinners up there, they're pretty high and going in random directions. Over time, the whole cloud slowly descends towards the stream. When fall is imminent, the cloud is at head level and they all start flying in the same direction, upstream.

It's just unfortunate that often, it gets too dark to track it like that. You see em high up. The sun sets and you lose the backlight. You still have enough light to fish, but you lost sight of the bugs, and are worried about the aforementioned cosmic event. Then right as you lose fishing light, the fish go nuts, they were there all along.

Posted on: 2012/4/24 8:00


Re: Spinner fall

Joined:
2006/9/13 10:18
From LV
Posts: 7749
Offline
The easiest way to see spinners in the air while you are fishing is to look up toward the sky periodically toward a light source, sometimes they are a couple hundred feet up, but if there are a lot of them you'll see the clouds. Disclaimer, don't look into the sun.

Also pay attention to what is happening over the riffles, often the spinners are flying within 5 to 6 feet of the water over the riffles when they start laying eggs. If you see these bug over riffles change you fly to the appropriate spinner pattern. Trout recognize the spinners on the water immediately and because the spinners don't escape the surface, the trout chow down until they are gone.

You will most definitely see this behavior during the trico season as the tricos start falling on the water. When you first arrive at dawn you likely see spinners over the sunny areas of the stream, then as the sun rises they spread out and during the mating flight you see them getting lower over the water until at last there are large concentrations over the riffles laying eggs and falling spent on the riffles.

Trout bunch up at the lower end of riffles during the spinnerfall because the largest concentrations of spinners are available to the trout at the ends of riffles. Look for the gulping rise and bubbles on the water where you see the rise and you'll know when the spinners are on the water.

One last thing, not all spinners are equal, they don't all fly upstream in the mating flight just before dropping on the water, for sure GD's do. But some fly up into trees, March Browns do this and they may stay there for a day doing whatever mayflies do before they come out of the trees enmass again to lay eggs and die. Know the differences of the sexes too, because not all spinners of the same species are the same color.

Posted on: 2012/4/24 8:29
_________________
There is always time to do more to protect wild trout.


Re: Spinner fall

Joined:
2008/1/31 17:19
From Pretty much everywhere at some point, Thorndale today.
Posts: 13556
Offline
I love the tricos because you can hit the same spinner fall more than once in the same morning.

They pretty much fall when the sun gets full on the water. But that doesn't happen evenly. So focus on the sunny areas first, fish the spinner fall, then hussle off to a more shaded area, where they won't have fallen yet.

Even better when there's morning fog over the stream. They'll fall when the sun burns through. So the disintegrating fog is like a marker. No fog here, they fell here already. But over here, fog still there, they haven't fallen here yet.

Posted on: 2012/4/24 8:36


Re: Spinner fall

Joined:
2006/9/13 10:18
From LV
Posts: 7749
Offline
The thing about tricos is it's one of the longest hatch periods of any mayfly on the LL it lasts from approx. 7/1 to 12/1. That's a pretty long time. As fall progresses they fall later and later during the day.

Posted on: 2012/4/24 20:20
_________________
There is always time to do more to protect wild trout.


Re: Spinner fall

Joined:
2010/1/2 15:17
From PA and NH
Posts: 766
Offline
The best part of spent mayflies are the ones present the next day,
the trout don't forget the easy meal and will sometimes key in on them throughout the day. When you find yourself in a multiple hatch and can't figure out what in the world they're taking, look for spent bugs to match for size and tie on a rusty spinner of the appropriate size, you will be presently surprised. I've had trout taking spinners this year like they were chasing caddis, charging through the film and nearly launching themselves into space. I can't explain it but other observant guys have noticed the same behavior.

Posted on: 2012/4/24 20:58


Re: Spinner fall

Joined:
2006/10/25 12:30
From York
Posts: 450
Offline
Even if the spinner fall doesn't happen or you are pre-spinner fall, tie on a spinner and see what happens. I've caught many fish when the spinners haven't started yet or not at all because the trout are "anticipating" the easy meal.

Posted on: 2012/4/25 12:50
_________________
7X makes the small fish feel bigger.



« 1 (2)



You can view topic.
You cannot start a new topic.
You cannot reply to posts.
You cannot edit your posts.
You cannot delete your posts.
You cannot add new polls.
You cannot vote in polls.
You cannot attach files to posts.
You cannot post without approval.

[Advanced Search]





Site Content
Login
Username:

Password:

Remember me



Lost Password?

Register now!
Stay Connected

twitterfeed.com facebook instagram RSS Feed

Sponsors
Polls
Will you be fly fishing this autumn?
Yes
No
Thinking about it
_PL_TOTALVOTES
The poll will close at 2014/10/31 17:56
1 Comment





Copyright 2014 by PaFlyFish.com | Privacy Policy| Provided by Kile Media Group | Design by 7dana.com