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Can you I.D this?

Joined:
2015/5/27 4:35
From Chester county pa
Posts: 14
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Keep seeing them around my yard. Small stream runs through it.

http://i219.photobucket.com/albums/cc ... 65DA3789E_zpstnseoemh.jpg

Posted on: 2016/5/22 9:00


Re: Can you I.D this?

Joined:
2013/9/6 11:40
From Westmoreland Cty
Posts: 155
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Although it's not as orangish/yellow as the Sulfurs I'm used to seeing in central/SC, I believe it to be a Sulfur (male Dorothea), due to the pale blue wings (without venation), ||| Tails, and pale color type.

Posted on: 2016/5/22 21:16


Re: Can you I.D this?

Joined:
2015/5/27 4:35
From Chester county pa
Posts: 14
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Thanks

Posted on: 2016/5/23 4:42


Re: Can you I.D this?

Joined:
2008/1/31 17:19
From Pretty much everywhere at some point, Thorndale today.
Posts: 2344
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Yeah, it's a ephemerella dorothea. AKA "small sulpher" around these parts, which distinguishes it from the closely related but larger ephemerella invaria, which is our larger sulpher. In other areas these may be called pale evening duns, or PED's.

Learn all about em here, with some pics.

http://www.troutnut.com/hatch/458/May ... dorothea-Pale-Evening-Dun



Posted on: 2016/5/23 7:37


Re: Can you I.D this?

Joined:
2012/12/28 19:16
Posts: 13
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pcray, that is a great link on sulphurs. I am new to fly fishing and the different hatches. Over the last few weeks I have been fishing evenings during the sulphur hatch. I caught a few using a pheasant tail nymph and a sulphur dun imitation, but to be honest I got skunked most evenings. The fish would start to get active about 30 minutes before dark. I caught some of these sulphurs in my hand when they flew by, they looked to me like size 14 and 16. So, for help going forward for next year, what fly and when to use it for these sulphur's. I just think I am using the wrong fly and at the wrong time. Suggestions will be appreciated..

Posted on: 2016/6/12 21:24


Re: Can you I.D this?

Joined:
2008/1/31 17:19
From Pretty much everywhere at some point, Thorndale today.
Posts: 2344
Offline
Fly5,

Here's a similar link on our other main type of sulpher, the invaria.

http://www.troutnut.com/hatch/11/Mayf ... rella-invaria-Sulphur-Dun

Invaria - larger (14-16). More orangish as duns and dark brown as spinners. Hatch begins a week or more before the dorothea's most years. But they definitely overlap.

Dorothea - smaller (16-18). Pale yellow or whitish as duns and spinners tend to be grayish. Hatch begins later.

The typical MO is that the duns hatch in the evening. How long depends on weather. Hot sunny days, it may just be a half hour before dark. On cool, cloudy days, it may begin mid afternoon and go all afternoon/evening. They are both swimming nymphs. Aside from hatching time, they look like schools of skinny minnows in slack waters. Prior to hatching, they get in a soft current, get just under the surface film, and go motionless and drift for a while. The back then breaks open and a dun emerges onto the surface, then drifts a while to dry it's wings before taking flight. Fish may key on different parts of this. On drier days, the duns don't float as long, so they're more likely to key on the floating nymphs or emergers. On more humid, or rainy days, the duns struggle to dry their wings so they drift longer, making it more likely the fish key on higher floating dun patterns (catskill ties, thorax ties, etc.).

Then, usually, right at dusk the spinners come back. Usually amassing in clouds over riffles mating and laying eggs and falling spent. More fish suddenly begin rising and the rise form changes. You want spent wing spinner patterns here.

There are some that use a fly that floats flush on the water, like a parachute or comparadun. Under the theory that it can reasonably approximate an emerger, dun, or spinner. Jack of all trades. But master of none. How well it works depends on how picky the fish are.

I usually start off trying to figure it out. I'll tie on a high floating fly. My favorite being cut wing thorax patterns. Then, as a dropper, an unweighted pheasant tail nymph tied on a dry fly hook and greased a little. You're trying to almost float it. Then you have a proper dun pattern and a proper floating nymph. Let the fish tell you what they want. If they take the dropper, fine, keep at it. If they take the dry, cut off the dropper and fish the dry.

Then I'll try to be at the head of a pool near a riffle as dusk approaches. When I see the cloud of spinners flying about, I switch to the spinner. Usually a little too early but that's better than too late, cause once it starts it doesn't last all that long and tying on a fly in the half dark isn't super quick....

Posted on: 2016/6/15 8:32


Re: Can you I.D this?

Joined:
2012/12/28 19:16
Posts: 13
Offline

pcray,

That is some great info. and another good link. I am learning the hard way about trying to get a different fly on in dim light. Last night there were a couple large 14+ size sulphurs and a few green mayflys. I wasn't able to grab one for a closer look. Very little activity with the bugs and the fish. Thanks again for the info..

Posted on: 2016/6/15 16:59






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