Register now on PaFlyFish.com! Login
HOME FORUM BLOG PHOTOS LINKS


Sponsors

Browsing this Thread:   1 Anonymous Users



(1) 2 3 »


bamboo rods

Joined:
2013/6/30 16:11
From biglerville,pa.
Posts: 51
Offline
could someone tell me whats the good points of a bamboo rod & bad

Posted on: 4/23 16:47


Re: bamboo rods

Joined:
2011/6/12 20:15
From Newville, PA
Posts: 424
Offline
Good: Feel and casting rhythm. A good bamboo rod feels more like an extension of my arm than any other rod I've cast and I've cast more thana few in 45+ years of flyfishing. Fiberglass comes close as do some of the full flex rods made by Orvis. Perhaps I'm biased because I cut me teeth with bamboo in my hand and I simply find the slower rhythm to my liking. I purchased a Dream Catcher rod in 2012 and not fished another rod since.

Bad: High cost.

Also, additional care is required to wipe down the rod after fishing as well as hanging it in the rod sock to dry before placing in its case. Also, a bamboo rod needs to be stored in a cool, dry place with makes keeping in your vehicle in hot weather is out of the question.

Posted on: 4/23 18:09
_________________
“A government big enough to give you everything you want is a government big enough to take from you everything you have.” - Gerald R. Ford


Re: bamboo rods

Joined:
2008/1/31 17:19
From Pretty much everywhere at some point, Thorndale today.
Posts: 13667
Offline
I too have a dream catcher. Its a mistake to say bamboo is slow. Its true that they make lots of slow tapers because bamboo nuts like old styles and the old style is slow. But you can make fast tapers too.

Advantages. Well, theres a far bigger range of actions, and most custom jobs are truly custom as opposed to using an existing blank and adding accessories. Generally I think they tend to be more accurate than graphite. The weight and resulting momentum corrects some of my casting deficiencies.

Disadvantage has to be weight. This forces shorter rods or else they become tootip heavy. Shorter rods are not as good at lifting line over currents and the like. Another is cost. You can get some dirt cheap and there are diamonds in theruff. But a newer high quality rod from an established maker can easily run you a grand or more. When it comes to true distance casting I don't think they match graphite either, because of shorter length and an inability to make the stops abrupt with that much weight behind it.

Posted on: 4/23 20:47


Re: bamboo rods

Joined:
2013/10/29 14:04
From Westmoreland/Tioga
Posts: 220
Offline
I think pcray's post is very accurate.

For me, the pluses are the beauty of the material, and the tapers designed for fishing instead of distance casting.

I don't consider the weight to be a disadvantage on the cane rods I own (8' and shorter).

Disadvantages are no lifetime warranties and cost. However the premium graphite have closed the gap considerably. A Sage One lists for $775 and one of these (a cane rod as good as any out there and better than many) is priced at $850.

Posted on: 4/24 10:21


Re: bamboo rods

Joined:
1/6 9:36
From Montgomery, PA
Posts: 188
Offline
Quote:

pcray1231 wrote:
I too have a dream catcher. Its a mistake to say bamboo is slow. Its true that they make lots of slow tapers because bamboo nuts like old styles and the old style is slow. But you can make fast tapers too.

Advantages. Well, theres a far bigger range of actions, and most custom jobs are truly custom as opposed to using an existing blank and adding accessories. Generally I think they tend to be more accurate than graphite. The weight and resulting momentum corrects some of my casting deficiencies.

Disadvantage has to be weight. This forces shorter rods or else they become tootip heavy. Shorter rods are not as good at lifting line over currents and the like. Another is cost. You can get some dirt cheap and there are diamonds in theruff. But a newer high quality rod from an established maker can easily run you a grand or more. When it comes to true distance casting I don't think they match graphite either, because of shorter length and an inability to make the stops abrupt with that much weight behind it.


nailed it.
I made a 7'6 4wt 2/2 for my father. it was a medium/fast action I would say and not only did I find it to be a bit heavy (as expected) but it did present some issues in the riffle mending line.

as above stated it comes down to cost. From start to finish there is nothing like starting with raw bamboo, planning it correctly to specific tapers, and fishing with it when finished. That alone buying from a reputable maker is undoubtedly going to cost at least 1k for sure like pcray stated.

There are some kits out there that provide you with reasonable options to build (if you were ever so inclined) or take to a rod builder to try it out and see if its something you like to fish with.

I will say that I skipped out on the fun part of splitting my own Tonkin cane and went right to a source in china to get a rod blank that was apready prepped for me.

That's why I will consider myself now a bamboo rod "builder" not "maker"

all in all when I was finished I think I had about 300 or a little more into it minus my time. Which I never charge for because its a passion not a job.

in any event, I sincerely hope you get the info you are searching for. I do not know a ton about them but if you ever decide you want to try and build one from a kit shoot me a message. You have most of the equipment in your home already.

Chris

Posted on: 4/24 10:43


Re: bamboo rods

Joined:
2009/12/2 19:56
From SE Pa
Posts: 334
Offline
Compared to a modern graphite or fiberglass rod, bamboo can be heavy; that's why -all other things equal - used bamboo on ebay that are 6'6'" -'or 7'6" will sell for more than the longer ones.

A modern glass rod can give you similar action with lighter weight, and may cause some real head-scratching about one's preferences, especially in the 6'6" - 7'9" range.

Posted on: 4/24 10:49


Re: bamboo rods

Joined:
2006/9/13 18:28
From chester ct
Posts: 532
Offline
Other advantages for boo are that they are more durable, especially compared to the latest generations super fast hollow plastic tubes. And even if you manage to break a bamboo, they can be repaired. Depending on the taper, boos tend to protect 7-12X better on the hookup and fight, and also hold the fish better. The feel of the fish on boo is much better than plastic, although some glass (especially some of the new ones) and boron are pretty good.

The stroke is different, but after I ffish with fast graphite for awhile, when I switch back to boo I don't feel like I have to 'push' the rod. An analogy: imagine using a hammer with no weight at all to drive a nail.

Posted on: 4/24 10:56
_________________
tl
les


Re: bamboo rods

Joined:
2010/6/9 12:35
From down the block from the Letort.
Posts: 936
Offline
Good Points: For the most part, they are beautifully made works of true craftsmanship, not mass produced soulless factory product. They're fun and relaxing to cast once you find the tapers that work with your style. They're much more durable than most folks think. And if it matters to you, they will hold value much better than plastic rods.

Cons: Other than cost, I can't really think of any. They may require a bit of extra upkeep, if you like taking care of your gear. If not, most of that's just the anal tendency of the owner....you don't really need to wipe the rod down with a clean diaper cloth after every use, or air it out necessarily. But if you like keeping your gear nice, the minor effort is worth it. And on the cost front, if you educate yourself and do some shopping, there are plenty of great cane rods out there in the affordable range (that being at or a couple hundred below what you'd pay for a top shelf plastic stick.) The Lancaster rods linked above are a great value, especially if you pick one up second hand in the $500-600 range. Also lots of nice vintage Orvis out there in that range also.


And unlike most others, I don't consider the weight to be an issue. Too me, complaining about the weight of a cane vs plastic rod is like complaining about the weight of a bottled beer vs one from a can...keep using the heavier tool and the you won't notice it over time.

And while PCray mentions that cane rods can be built to be 'fast', that fast is still gonna feel slow compared to hi end graphite. I had a DreamCatcher model for a while that was describe by them as their 'fastest taper', it was 7'6"/5wt and at most I'd rate it as similar to a 'medium-fast' plastic rod. No where near as quick as factory fast action, but definitely faster than the rest of my quiver...so I ended up trading it since it wasn't quite to my liking.

Which demonstrates to me one of the true beauties of cane rods, they can be made to suit your preferences from the ground up and as your tastes and style change, you can find a rod to match pretty easily.

Posted on: 4/24 11:09


Re: bamboo rods

Joined:
2013/6/30 16:11
From biglerville,pa.
Posts: 51
Offline
thanks guys,im going to get a 6ft 6in 3wt off ebay,brand new builder is from n.c.,i won the bid at 235.00,can,t wait till it gets here to try it out

Posted on: 4/24 12:46


Re: bamboo rods

Joined:
1/6 9:36
From Montgomery, PA
Posts: 188
Offline
there ya go. post some pictures of it when you get it so we can see

Posted on: 4/24 13:14


Re: bamboo rods

Joined:
2008/1/31 17:19
From Pretty much everywhere at some point, Thorndale today.
Posts: 13667
Offline
I only have one boo. And yeah, I'd call it "medium fast" by graphite standards. Medium fast suits me well, and yeah, it's among the faster DreamCatchers. I'm actually guessing mine is the same basic taper as the one tomit had, just extended to an 8 footer.

I have cast a few truly fast ones by other makers, though. Stick some bristles on the end and you have yourself a broom!

When you go to faster versions, you do lose some of the tippet protection and cool feel of fish that lestrout was talking about. That, again, has more to do with the bendiness (i.e. speed) of the rod than the material. Shows how many equate all bamboo with slow rods.

When I bought mine I test casted a whole bunch of rods to figure out what I wanted. What's really striking is how different every rod truly is. We feel differences between different graphite sticks, and those differences do exist, but after realizing how much larger the range is in bamboo, you begin to see all graphite sticks as awfully similar. I hated some and loved others. I have a feeling many bamboo "haters" try a few and hate them, and then transfer those emotions to the whole lot. It'd be the equivalent of test driving a Prius, not liking it, and then saying that all Toyota's are too small, weak, and slow.

Posted on: 4/24 13:19


Re: bamboo rods

Joined:
2013/10/29 14:04
From Westmoreland/Tioga
Posts: 220
Offline
Quote:

rubby wrote:
thanks guys,im going to get a 6ft 6in 3wt off ebay,brand new builder is from n.c.,i won the bid at 235.00,can,t wait till it gets here to try it out


Is that a new hand planed rod made by the guy in N.C.? If so, that is an unbelievably low price.

Posted on: 4/24 13:37


Re: bamboo rods

Joined:
2013/6/30 16:11
From biglerville,pa.
Posts: 51
Offline
yes it is

Posted on: 4/24 14:02


Re: bamboo rods

Joined:
1/9 13:36
Posts: 85
Offline
It is much easier to make a bad bamboo rod than a bad graphite rod and it all starts with the quality of the raw cane and the taper.

A poorly designed grass rod or rod that uses a poor piece of cane will feel like $hit. While there are hidden gems out there, for the most part expect to drop at least $350 to get yourself a quality used 3-6wt rod that feels good. If going to buy a new 3-6wt rod expect to drop at least $650 on a lessor known but quality boutique maker. At the $800-$1000 level you can get a tremendous new rod. If you don't mind heavier line weights,you can find nice used grass rods in 7/8wt for $250 simply because these weights aren't as popular.

Making a bamboo rod is a craft and an art. The maker needs to start with a quality piece of Tonkin and the better makers will discard more cane than they use while the less discerning makers will use every piece of cane they get so their rods are inconsistent from rod to rod due to inferior raw product. This is not cutting a piece of carbon fiber a certain way and wrapping it around a mandrel it's selecting the right piece of wood, splitting it, tapering it, and glueing it together.

It is amazing how different a 7.5 foot 4/5wt rod can feel based on different tapers. If you are planning on buying a grass rod, try many because some tapers you may love and others you may hate. A great starting point is a 7.5 foot 4/5wt rod based on the Paul Young Perfectionist taper. If there is one taper that everyone seems to like, this is the one.

Posted on: 4/24 14:06


Re: bamboo rods

Joined:
2011/6/12 20:15
From Newville, PA
Posts: 424
Offline
There are makers who guarantee the product. This is what drew me to Dream Catcher. Wyatt guarantees the rod for his lifetime. Given that he is at least 20 years younger than I, expect to outlive the warranty. God willing and the creek don't rise.

Posted on: 4/24 18:03
_________________
“A government big enough to give you everything you want is a government big enough to take from you everything you have.” - Gerald R. Ford



(1) 2 3 »



You can view topic.
You cannot start a new topic.
You cannot reply to posts.
You cannot edit your posts.
You cannot delete your posts.
You cannot add new polls.
You cannot vote in polls.
You cannot attach files to posts.
You cannot post without approval.

[Advanced Search]





Site Content
Login
Username:

Password:

Remember me



Lost Password?

Register now!
Stay Connected

twitterfeed.com facebook instagram RSS Feed

Sponsors
Polls
Will you be fly fishing this autumn?
Yes 95% (139)
No 0% (0)
Thinking about it 4% (6)
_PL_TOTALVOTES
The poll closed at 2014/10/31 17:56
1 Comment





Copyright 2014 by PaFlyFish.com | Privacy Policy| Provided by Kile Media Group | Design by 7dana.com