Register now on PaFlyFish.com! Login
HOME FORUM BLOG PHOTOS LINKS


Sponsors

Browsing this Thread:   1 Anonymous Users



(1) 2 3 4 »


First Aid Kits
Moderator
Joined:
2016/1/24 14:30
From Gettysburg
Posts: 3097
Offline
Let's talk first aid.

I've long been a devotee of carrying a good first aid kit. While there are many well designed and equipted FA kits available for sale, I've usually put mine together. I keep this FA kit in my car at all times and use it to stock a small, zip-lock bag FA kit that stays in my fishing vest. Such FA kits allow for quick treatment of the typical cuts and scrapes common to fishing trips but also the contingency of a more serious injury. Even small cuts and nicks, when exposed to dirty rocks with bird poop or stream water can get infected. A good FA kit can save a fishing trip.

My small vest bag FA kit in my vest includes:
-about a half dozen band-aids
-A larger gauze bandage
-A couple alcohol wipes
-A couple aspirin

In my larger FA kit in the car I have the following in a plastic bin(see pic below):
-More band-aids
-Antiseptic cream (Neosporin or Bacitracin)
-A bottle of Hydrogen Peroxide
-Alcohol wipes
-Aspirin and Ibuprofen
-Tourniquet
-Large wound military style bandage
-Hemostats, scissors, tweezers
-Latex gloves
-Gauze rolls
-Ace bandage
-Larger sized band-aids
-FA tape

Hopefully, a FA kit is one of those things that get less rather than more use, but I'm always secure in knowing I have one close by. If you don't have a FA kit, or haven't examined it lately, it might be a good time to inventory your FA kit.

So what do you have in your FA kit? Would you add or remove anything to or from my list? How do you store or carry your FA kit or materials when fishing?

Attach file:



jpg  FA4.JPG (141.51 KB)
13138_596ab48b3afd7.jpg 450X350 px

Posted on: 2017/7/15 20:36


Re: First Aid Kits

Joined:
2006/9/9 17:18
From lancaster county
Posts: 1465
Offline
Dave,

You have been very timely lately with things considered in my fishing life with your posts. My wife has been on me about this very thing and has been trying to come up with a practical first aid kit for me to take when I go fishing.

Thank you!

Posted on: 2017/7/15 21:14
_________________
http://cvtu.homestead.com/





Re: First Aid Kits

Joined:
2006/9/10 20:44
From Fayettenam
Posts: 402
Offline
I am a huge proponent of having a first aide kit. JayL from back in the day introduced me to blister band aides They have saved many days since i started carrying them

"Are your pods good ? Cause if your Pods aint good yer f'd" - Shimmity - one of many college housemates

Posted on: 2017/7/15 23:40
_________________
One man’s plague is a another man’s hatch


Re: First Aid Kits

Joined:
2012/6/5 21:59
From SWYC
Posts: 251
Offline
Looks like very complete kit. I see you have tweezers but I would add a actual tick removing tool. Also there blood clotting enhancer products available to stop heavy bleeds. (Bleed stop)

Posted on: 2017/7/16 7:06
_________________
Seven days without fishing makes one weak.


Re: First Aid Kits

Joined:
2010/9/1 13:55
From State College PA
Posts: 202
Offline
pepto bismol tablets

be mindful that H2O2 and antibacterial creams will have a greatly shortened half life in a hot car. Remove kits between trips and exchange sensitive components more often.

Posted on: 2017/7/16 7:42


Re: First Aid Kits

Joined:
2007/10/17 10:49
From florida
Posts: 2297
Offline
Great reminder, Dave it should be done annually,imo. I need to check the First Aid Kit on my boat to update and replace items.. I carry Goodies head Ache powders in orange flavor. If I was fishing for trout I'd include benadril for bee stings etc. Liquid bandage is good as well. Most Marie Stores like West marine have some good kits already made up.GG

Posted on: 2017/7/16 8:22
_________________
"You can easily judge the character of others by how they treat those who can do nothing for them or to them."
Malcolm Forbes


Re: First Aid Kits

Joined:
2006/9/21 0:02
From Pittsburgh
Posts: 1179
Offline

I carry some bandaids and tweezers for removing splinters. Along with small bottles of peroxide and alcohol - which I also use to clean my glasses.

After finding tics embedded in me the last few years, I now carry a tic remover.

With all of the poison ivy growing along most of the streams I fish, I also carry an ointment called Technu. It's supposed to wash alway the oils from the nasty weed. And I use it if I even think I might have touched it. Supposedly, the earlier you wash it away, the better. And once I get the rash and blisters, it takes weeks for it to clear up.


Posted on: 2017/7/16 8:28


Re: First Aid Kits

Joined:
2006/9/9 17:18
From lancaster county
Posts: 1465
Offline
Lately I have been carrying a snake bite kit with me when I go if I'm in an area heavy with them. Could be life and death pending on where you are.
Rare occurrence but still a thought

Posted on: 2017/7/16 10:13
_________________
http://cvtu.homestead.com/





Re: First Aid Kits

Joined:
2014/1/30 17:37
From State College, PA
Posts: 242
Offline
Since I'm allergic to bees...I would add to make sure your epi-pens are current and not expired. Benadryl as previously mentioned is good, and if you have access to prednisone- it would be wise to have some on hand as well. I know people worry about snakes, but of all the dangers out there in the field- I think bees pose the most common threat. I have been whacked bad by ground bees after inadvertently stepping on a nest, and I have pissed hornets off just getting remotely close to them. Having been to the ER 3x in the last two years following a fishing trip-I speak from experience.

Posted on: 2017/7/16 18:35


Re: First Aid Kits

Joined:
2006/12/13 9:28
From Other side of the tracks
Posts: 4752
Offline
Dave, I don't have any suggestions for your kit, other than maybe a magnifying glass. As my eyes get older, I find I need the magnification for various things, including removing splinters.

I have a couple comments as well.

1. Most experts now say that snake bite kits are not effective. Waste of money. Besides, how many of us have ever been bitten by a venomous snake.

2. The oil in poison ivy is water soluble. If you noticed you got into the stuff, wash the area right away with COLD water. Jewelweed also will help preventing poison ivy rash. It is quite common especially around the water so you don't have to carry it with you. Wash the area with cold water and then rub that stuff on. Some people rub it on before heading into areas with poison ivy as a preventative. One less thing to carry.

C. Note to self. Add one or two Benadryl to my water proof key chain pill bottle.

Posted on: 2017/7/17 16:05
_________________
Hank Patterson for President.



Re: First Aid Kits

Joined:
2006/9/9 17:18
From lancaster county
Posts: 1465
Offline
Dave true but I'm talking about when you are deep in, like WV when the nearest hospital is long off. In that case I would recommend trying. As I said, a rarity but it can happen and when you are that far off the beaten path, I would take it and try.

That said they are highly effective on bee stings.

Posted on: 2017/7/17 18:25
_________________
http://cvtu.homestead.com/





Re: First Aid Kits
Moderator
Joined:
2016/1/24 14:30
From Gettysburg
Posts: 3097
Offline
Quote:

nymphingmaniac wrote:
be mindful that H2O2 and antibacterial creams will have a greatly shortened half life in a hot car. Remove kits between trips and exchange sensitive components more often.


Thanks. I wasn't aware of that - good note to change these items out frequently.

Posted on: 2017/7/17 19:23


Re: First Aid Kits
Moderator
Joined:
2016/1/24 14:30
From Gettysburg
Posts: 3097
Offline
Quote:

FarmerDave wrote:

2. The oil in poison ivy is water soluble. If you noticed you got into the stuff, wash the area right away with COLD water. Jewelweed also will help preventing poison ivy rash. It is quite common especially around the water so you don't have to carry it with you. Wash the area with cold water and then rub that stuff on. Some people rub it on before heading into areas with poison ivy as a preventative.


Thanks. I wasn't aware of that.

Posted on: 2017/7/17 19:24


Re: First Aid Kits
Moderator
Joined:
2016/1/24 14:30
From Gettysburg
Posts: 3097
Offline
I still have an old 1970s era snake-bite kit that still has a razor to make the "X" cuts over the fang wounds like they used to do in western movies. This has long since been discredited. I've even heard that the suction cups are pointless as well, although using a suction cup on a fresh bite makes sense to me.

Here in PA the likelyhood of a venomous snakebite is exceedingly remote. I do worry sometimes about dogs that accompany me on fishing trips. When I lived in west Texas and other parts of the South I paid a good bit more concern about snakes.

Posted on: 2017/7/17 19:29


Re: First Aid Kits

Joined:
2006/12/13 9:28
From Other side of the tracks
Posts: 4752
Offline
Quote:

Dave_W wrote:
I still have an old 1970s era snake-bite kit that still has a razor to make the "X" cuts over the fang wounds like they used to do in western movies. This has long since been discredited. I've even heard that the suction cups are pointless as well, although using a suction cup on a fresh bite makes sense to me.

Here in PA the likelyhood of a venomous snakebite is exceedingly remote. I do worry sometimes about dogs that accompany me on fishing trips. When I lived in west Texas and other parts of the South I paid a good bit more concern about snakes.


Once the venom is in the blood stream, you aren't going to suck it back out. In fact, some experts claim it could make things worse by concentrating the poison at the injection site causing more tissue damage.

I have some doubts that the suction devised would be effective on bee stings. I could be wrong though, since that venom is barely under the skin. What I have found that actually seems to work, is smear mud on the sting. The mud seems to draw some of the venom out.

But if I am stung at home, I go straight to the house and take a Bendadyl. In fact, if I am going to be working on/in the hives, I sometimes take one beforehand.

I am developing a sensitivity to bee stings. I suppose it started after I got stung a couple dozen times one day. That day I just had a lot of swelling. The stings were all on my forearms, and I looked like Popeye the next day. The next time i got stung, it was on the neck, and got the full effect. Bee had gotten inside my suit. I felt a heat rush to my head immediately. I didn't get treatment right away, and ended up with all the signs of anaphylactic shock, except for no difficulty in breathing. Rash head to toe, felt warm all over, drop in pulse and BP... It was quite a rush. 20 minutes later the signs were still persisting so I took a Benadryl and it cleared up.

Some people develop immunity to the stings, the more they get stung. Others develop more sensitivity to it. I unfortunately seem to be the latter. Ever since then, when I get stung, I swell up badly and can feel the other symptoms coming on. But Benadryl seems to greatly reduce the effect. I also keep a stick of Sting-eeze in my cupboard next to the Benadryl. The itch afterwards from a bee sting can be maddening, and scratching it just makes me swell up worse. But between the Benadryl and applying some Sting-eeze to the area, the sting ends up being no worse than a skeeter bite after 10 minutes or so.

So you might want to add a stick of Sting-eeze to your kit, or something similar. It works on other bug bites, too. At least it seems to for me.

Posted on: 2017/7/18 7:32
_________________
Hank Patterson for President.




(1) 2 3 4 »



You can view topic.
You cannot start a new topic.
You cannot reply to posts.
You cannot edit your posts.
You cannot delete your posts.
You cannot add new polls.
You cannot vote in polls.
You cannot attach files to posts.
You cannot post without approval.

[Advanced Search]





Site Content
Login
Sponsors
Stay Connected

twitterfeed.com facebook
USGS Water Levels <Click Map>





Copyright 2019 by PaFlyFish.com | Privacy Policy| Provided by Kile Media Group | Design by 7dana.com