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Re: First Aid Kits
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2006/9/9 9:29
From Monessen, PA
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I can whistle loudly, but I carry a whistle on excursions into unfamiliar woods. In a state of distress it would be easier to make a loud noise and the sound of a whistle blowing is more likely to draw attention to yourself, to draw in human help and to ward off animal encounters.

Posted on: 2017/7/20 9:15
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Re: First Aid Kits

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2011/7/6 13:48
From Philadelphia PA
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Do they make a pocket nature language translater? one day I heard a kitten crying and went searching for it, and it turned out to be a bird. I'm so glad that I didn't find a kitten and that the bird did'nt laugh at me for being fooled.

Posted on: 2017/7/20 9:20
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I wonder why Pharmaceutical side effects never include words like: STONED, INTOXICATED, MUNCHIES?

Fun Fact: Did you know that toilet paper has a "best if used by" label? Find out at Urass.org


Re: First Aid Kits

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2006/12/13 9:28
From Other side of the tracks
Posts: 4769
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Quote:

JackM wrote:
I can whistle loudly, but I carry a whistle on excursions into unfamiliar woods. In a state of distress it would be easier to make a loud noise and the sound of a whistle blowing is more likely to draw attention to yourself, to draw in human help and to ward off animal encounters.


Jack, that has merit.

If I heard a whistle blowing out in the middle of nowhere, I'd assume someone was in distress, possibly even a kid.

On the other hand, if I heard you yelling out in the middle of nowhere, I might think you needed help, but my arrival could be delayed while I am rolling on the ground laughing at the silly mupear for getting lost.

Posted on: 2017/7/20 9:36
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Re: First Aid Kits

Joined:
2011/7/6 13:48
From Philadelphia PA
Posts: 1167
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Maybe he's not lost, but stuck in the mud. And that is no laughing matter. I found out the stuck way when I stepped into the mud and sunk almost up to my knees once. I thank God there was some else around to help me out.




There is a safety tag that is being placed on every whistle...It states "Blow Me" with an arrow pointing to the correct location.

Posted on: 2017/7/20 10:44
_________________
I wonder why Pharmaceutical side effects never include words like: STONED, INTOXICATED, MUNCHIES?

Fun Fact: Did you know that toilet paper has a "best if used by" label? Find out at Urass.org


Re: First Aid Kits

Joined:
2006/12/13 9:28
From Other side of the tracks
Posts: 4769
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Quote:

PennypackFlyer wrote:
Maybe he's not lost, but stuck in the mud. And that is no laughing matter.


I disagree. Either way, I'm laughing.

Quote:
I found out the stuck way when I stepped into the mud and sunk almost up to my knees once. I thank God there was some else around to help me out.


Only up to your knees? Unless you went in head first (like the menure pile), that aint stuck and is most certainly laugh worthy. No way would I yell, or blow a whistle to get laughed at, but you should consider carrying an air horn to draw an audience.

Quote:

There is a safety tag that is being placed on every whistle...It states "Blow Me" with an arrow pointing to the correct location.


Funny, but wouldn't surprise me.


Attach file:



jpg  this sign has sharp edges.jpg (39.49 KB)
348_5970eb15ee448.jpg 315X304 px

Posted on: 2017/7/20 13:40
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Re: First Aid Kits

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2006/12/7 18:13
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Quote:

FarmerDave wrote:
Quote:

Dave_W wrote:
Quote:

FarmerDave wrote:

2. The oil in poison ivy is water soluble. If you noticed you got into the stuff, wash the area right away with COLD water. Jewelweed also will help preventing poison ivy rash. It is quite common especially around the water so you don't have to carry it with you. Wash the area with cold water and then rub that stuff on. Some people rub it on before heading into areas with poison ivy as a preventative.


Thanks. I wasn't aware of that.


I can't remember where I heard/read that about the cold water, but it made sense. I emphasize cold, because warm will open your pores.

You are standing in a cold stream anyway...

But I recommend that you take that with a grain of salt. I could just be (actually likely) that I am one of the lucky ones who isn't sensitive to poison ivy, but I don't want to test that theory by rolling around in it.


I'll add the grain of salt...

Urushiol, the stuff in poison ivy that causes the allergic reaction is barely soluble in water, alcohol is better but not even alcohol will do the trick once it is absorbed into the skin, which happens within 10 minutes or less. Soap & water or Technu are effective.

As someone who gets poison ivy by just talking about it and has been in the hospital twice from it, I always carry soap in some form. Small packets of soap leaves marketed by Coleman and others are great or a small bottle of Camp Suds in a pocket is the best way to wash off if you come in contact. Having some soap has other benefits in the event nature calls.

I also carry Technu wipes in case the contact comes when water isn’t handy. The only disadvantage to any type of wipe in a packet is despite being sealed, they eventually dry out so you may end up with something that is useless when you need it. Soap never goes anywhere, especially the soap leaves.

The bottom line is urushiol sensitivity INCREASES with contact so avoidance if possible or washing off quickly is the key to DECREASED sensitivity. If you are lucky enough to think you are not allergic, don’t take chances with contact and no one should try any folk medicine methods like eating the stuff.

Many experts believe everyone is allergic to urushiol but in varying degrees. Deliberate exposure may put you in a place you don’t want to be.

Posted on: 2017/7/20 15:09


Re: First Aid Kits

Joined:
2015/6/1 16:22
From Burke VA
Posts: 1836
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Quote:

Bamboozle wrote:



The bottom line is urushiol sensitivity INCREASES with contact so avoidance if possible or washing off quickly is the key to DECREASED sensitivity. If you are lucky enough to think you are not allergic, don’t take chances with contact and no one should try any folk medicine methods like eating the stuff.

Many experts believe everyone is allergic to urushiol but in varying degrees. Deliberate exposure may put you in a place you don’t want to be.


I have been told this many times but I used to get it bad as a child. I have not had in 25 years or so and believe me it's not for lack of trying Man, I'm really screwed now, not even a bandage to cover the poison ivy I'm going to get.

Posted on: 2017/7/20 15:55


Re: First Aid Kits

Joined:
2011/7/6 13:48
From Philadelphia PA
Posts: 1167
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Well, when you do get it, get an over the counter allergy medication to control the itch and an antiperspirant to dry it out.

Posted on: 2017/7/20 16:10
_________________
I wonder why Pharmaceutical side effects never include words like: STONED, INTOXICATED, MUNCHIES?

Fun Fact: Did you know that toilet paper has a "best if used by" label? Find out at Urass.org


Re: First Aid Kits

Joined:
2011/7/6 13:48
From Philadelphia PA
Posts: 1167
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FD, you must have a menure fettish or something. Maybe you got stuck in it when you were a kid or an adult. I guess we should bring a pile of that as well, in case we needs a fire.

Dkile: I was trying to figure out why you would need extra tampons....then I realized that TP stood for toilet paper.

Posted on: 2017/7/20 16:13
_________________
I wonder why Pharmaceutical side effects never include words like: STONED, INTOXICATED, MUNCHIES?

Fun Fact: Did you know that toilet paper has a "best if used by" label? Find out at Urass.org


Re: First Aid Kits

Joined:
2006/12/7 18:13
Posts: 426
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In regards to first aid kits,...

No kit for me but I always carry a knife, whiskey, a lighter, some cigars and a whistle.

If I get hurt bad and can't make it back to the car where there is a bare bones first aid kit and cold beer in case I have to get the nerve to suture myself up...

I'll bleed out where I am while I'm drinking the whiskey, smoking the cigars and blowing the whistle...

...so the bears don't eat me.

Posted on: 2017/7/20 16:27


Re: First Aid Kits

Joined:
2016/2/26 9:10
Posts: 888
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Quote:

ryansheehan wrote:
Quote:

Bamboozle wrote:



The bottom line is urushiol sensitivity INCREASES with contact so avoidance if possible or washing off quickly is the key to DECREASED sensitivity. If you are lucky enough to think you are not allergic, don’t take chances with contact and no one should try any folk medicine methods like eating the stuff.

Many experts believe everyone is allergic to urushiol but in varying degrees. Deliberate exposure may put you in a place you don’t want to be.


I have been told this many times but I used to get it bad as a child. I have not had in 25 years or so and believe me it's not for lack of trying Man, I'm really screwed now, not even a bandage to cover the poison ivy I'm going to get.


Thats interesting that experts say that everyone is allergic. I've never had a reaction to poison ivy and I've 100% have came in contact with it many many times, its also interesting to note that my brother doesnt have any reactions to it either.

Posted on: 2017/7/20 16:31


Re: First Aid Kits

Joined:
2015/6/1 16:22
From Burke VA
Posts: 1836
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According to experts the more you come in contact the worse your reaction is. Your reaction now may be unnoticeable but with continued exposure your reaction would grow, possibly to a point where you would notice. My personal experiences tell me other wise(as stated above) but they are far from scientific.

Posted on: 2017/7/20 19:31


Re: First Aid Kits

Joined:
2012/9/26 8:06
From lower burrell, pa
Posts: 396
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This one time at Jam Camp FD fell in the stream and a dog barked #OutLoud

Posted on: 2017/7/20 19:33


Re: First Aid Kits

Joined:
2008/10/25 14:19
From York County
Posts: 170
Offline
Quote:
I'll add the grain of salt...

Urushiol, the stuff in poison ivy that causes the allergic reaction is barely soluble in water, alcohol is better but not even alcohol will do the trick once it is absorbed into the skin, which happens within 10 minutes or less. Soap & water or Technu are effective. 

As someone who gets poison ivy by just talking about it and has been in the hospital twice from it, I always carry soap in some form. Small packets of soap leaves marketed by Coleman and others are great or a small bottle of Camp Suds in a pocket is the best way to wash off if you come in contact. Having some soap has other benefits in the event nature calls.

I also carry Technu wipes in case the contact comes when water isn’t handy. The only disadvantage to any type of wipe in a packet is despite being sealed, they eventually dry out so you may end up with something that is useless when you need it. Soap never goes anywhere, especially the soap leaves.

The bottom line is urushiol sensitivity INCREASES with contact so avoidance if possible or washing off quickly is the key to DECREASED sensitivity. If you are lucky enough to think you are not allergic, don’t take chances with contact and no one should try any folk medicine methods like eating the stuff.

Many experts believe everyone is allergic to urushiol but in varying degrees. Deliberate exposure may put you in a place you don’t want to be.


When I was a kid I got poison real bad a couple times. I don't know if you can find it anymore, but I used Fels-Naptha soap and that stuff dried it right up in a few days.

I don't if I buy the whole argument that more exposure increases sensitivity. Scientific or not, I never get a reaction from poison any more and I know I've weed wacked the stuff and walked through it in shorts for years. Common sense would tell me that from experience and from accounts of others who have said the same, that it just doesn't seem very solid. Scientist don't always get everything right, and degree can't buy common sense. And who am I to disagree, but I do, and that's just like, my opinion, man.




Posted on: 2017/7/20 22:01
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Re: First Aid Kits

Joined:
2015/6/1 16:22
From Burke VA
Posts: 1836
Offline
I decided to check around Al's internets for info on poison ivy and seems becoming less allergic is pretty common. Found this on web md:

Sensitivity to poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac varies from a mild to severe reaction, and may not cause any reaction at all the first time you're exposed. Some adults who reacted to poison ivy as children may find that they are now less sensitive. Some may even lose their sensitivity altogether.


Posted on: 2017/7/20 22:19



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