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Re: 7'6 Rod

Joined:
2010/9/1 13:55
From State College PA
Posts: 494
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I don't know if this helps, but i fish a 7 ft 4wt for small streams. I am satisfied, but more often I miss that extra 6 inches (7'6") rather than wish the rod was shorter (6'6" or less). This is just my experience though

Posted on: 2012/10/22 19:36


Re: 7'6 Rod

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2009/7/29 10:25
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OK, there are several factors here: 1) how big a brookie stream (8' wide or 15' wide?; are the longer pools 20 ft long or 40 ft long?); 2) will you want to cast nymphs (or a dry&dropper rig) much, or mostly just dry flies? For casting nymphs or casting a dry fly 45 feet, yeah forget about a two weight...

But brookies will often charge at dry flies, which is fun. And maybe more fun on the smaller brookie streams with a two weight ...

So I dunno about the advice to steer clear of two weights on small brookie streams (pools < 30 ft long), at least with with dry flies... Depends on what you want to do, in my opinion... I think fishing is more fun tossing dries to brookies with a two weight rod overlined w/ a 3w line than a heavier rod. If you do run into a long 40 ft pool, 2w rods aren't great for that...

And a good 7'3" 2w rod overlined with a 3w line is EZ to cast with dry flies... Sure, you can sometimes catch more fish with a heavier 3-4-5w rod tossing nymphs, but to me catching small fish is just more fun with lightweight gear... even if it means I dont catch as many fish some times... Fishing is supposed to be fun! Ill fish dry flies on light rods until the water is so cold that even brookies stop hitting dry flies, ... then I use a heavier rod with dry and dropper...

See the review of the 7'3" echo carbon 2w below... as one reviewer states, its a great rod for small trout, and not that expensive ....

http://www.flyfishohio.com/2-Weight_Shoot-Out/2-Weight_Rods.htm

Heres the last stream I fished (image)... 10 ft wide. I want a rod less than 7'6" here, maybe even 6'6" or less ,,, you can fish a lot of different streams this size all on public land ...


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Posted on: 2012/10/22 19:50

Edited by k-bob on 2012/10/22 20:17:43
Edited by k-bob on 2012/10/22 20:20:11
Edited by k-bob on 2012/10/22 20:20:38
Edited by k-bob on 2012/10/22 20:24:01
Edited by k-bob on 2012/10/22 20:26:29
Edited by k-bob on 2012/10/22 20:28:36
Edited by k-bob on 2012/10/22 20:30:01
Edited by k-bob on 2012/10/22 20:34:27
Edited by k-bob on 2012/10/22 20:36:40
Edited by k-bob on 2012/10/22 20:39:41
Edited by k-bob on 2012/10/22 20:40:32


Re: 7'6 Rod

Joined:
2010/6/19 16:43
From Clinton County, Pa.
Posts: 1814
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Quote:

Fishidiot wrote:
Stagger,
Agree with Swattie further up.

The only thing I would add: at this stage in your fly fishing career I'd recommend you stay away from 2 or 3WT rods. Get a 4WT.
I agree. A 7'6" 4 weight IMO is the way to go.

Posted on: 2012/10/22 20:31
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"Even the thousandth trip to the same familiar stream begins with renewed hope and unfailing faith." ZANE GREY


Re: 7'6 Rod

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2009/7/29 10:25
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I dunno guys, I am the Keith Stone of fly casting and I do OK with two weight rods with 3w lines and dry flies on small brookie streams

Posted on: 2012/10/22 20:46


Re: 7'6 Rod

Joined:
2008/1/31 17:19
From Pretty much everywhere at some point, Thorndale today.
Posts: 13599
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Stagger, Swattie's first post is dead nuts.

FWIW, my main brookie rod is a 7'6" Cortland GRX. 4/5 wt. I have two spools for the reel, one loaded with a 7 wt line, and one with a 5 wt. On the smaller, thicker streams I generally take the 7 wt, but on streams where I expect to do a little longer distance casting I load it with the 5 wt.

When most casts are 10-15 ft, overlining really isn't overlining from the rod's point of view, and the differences between line weights seem to be diminished. I do subscribe to the heavier rod weights, fast action philosophy. IMO, you're just not going after 7" brookies for the fight. I do it for the places. But I also enjoy challenging myself on the casts. Can I put it under that branch? Can I curve it around that rock? Throwing tight loops and having some real momentum in that line helps with these things.

So my advice is to find a 7'6" 5wt with a fairly fast action and overline it. Don't spend too much, you should expect to abuse it, and not feel the least bit squeamish about doing so. I think TFO makes one. Cabala's TQR (tight quarters rod) may as well. But generally they are hard to find. 7'6" 4 wts are much more common and they'll do just fine. And to start with, don't even worry about the reel. Throw your 6 wt reel on it with the 6 wt line, just change the leader.

Posted on: 2012/10/23 8:07

Edited by pcray1231 on 2012/10/23 8:29:41


Re: 7'6 Rod

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2009/7/29 10:25
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pat raises a good point about the reel and line... if you use a two weight rod such as the 7'3" echo carbon, you'll need a light reel such as a a 2.2 oz forbes magnesium (ebay $80) and a a 3w line. this gear cant and probably shouldnt be used with big water, big fish, big flies, or in big wind. but you just dont run into a big brown trout on a small highly tannic PA brookie stream while fishing dries -- I never have.

On a small tannic brookie stream, there is no need for long casts, and hiking and casting with a long rod does not work as well. As long as you bring the fish in in the same quick manner, it is probably easier on the fish to use a lighter weight rod that will give a bit when you set the hook. I bring in fish just as fast with a 2w as a 5w, but it is fun to have the rod bend and feel the fish more. Scale the gear to the size of the stream and the size of the fish. I fish without barbs, and as some guys here have seen, I bring 'em in and let 'em go quickly, sometimes too fast for the guy I am fishing with to get a fish picture. I want to minimize harm to fish. However PA small tannic stream brookies are just not strong enough to extend the fish fight time with a 2w.

Everyone fishes in the way that makes sense to them, and I acknowledge that using lightweight gear has its limitations on casting weight, making long casts, and only being good for truly small streams. But I havent heard anyone on this thread say that they have fished really small PA brookie streams using dry flies with a 7'6" 4-5W and a 7' 2w, and that the 2w was not really more FUN.


Posted on: 2012/10/23 8:50


Re: 7'6 Rod

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2011/5/3 12:22
From South Lebanon Township, PA
Posts: 1944
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Quote:

k-bob wrote:
I bring em in and let em go quickly, sometimes too fast for the guy I am fishing with to get a fish picture.


^ Yes, he really does!


Posted on: 2012/10/23 8:54


Re: 7'6 Rod

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thanks swattie ... I caught a really nice brookie fishing waaaaay out there with troubert, and got the fish swimming before TB could get there to take its picture. since you can catch a lot of brookies I think its good to try to minimize harm to the fish. may be less likely to launch a little guy out of the water with a rod that gives and sends less force to fish on hook set.


Posted on: 2012/10/23 8:58


Re: 7'6 Rod

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2006/9/11 13:05
From Lewistown
Posts: 3629
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Stagger,

Yeah building a rod with supervison would be easy and a weekend project.

If you don't want to build find somebody who would do it for you.

Side note: my 6'6" 2 wt. cost me $35 and is a Pac Bay blank with a wood reel seat.
My reel was a SA from Walmart for $25 (on sale) and the line was discounted to $10.

$70 for a whole combo that will last a lifetime and has never had aproblem catching fish. To me that's way better than $200 on a rod and $100 for a reel.

Posted on: 2012/10/23 12:10
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Re: 7'6 Rod

Joined:
2012/1/9 19:50
From Etters,Pa
Posts: 723
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I'm relatively new to small stream fishing but not to fundamental fly fishing. Whether your fishing small stream,large streams,rivers or lakes use what works for you and what your comfortable with not what the industry says you should use. For example I take a completely different approach when fishing small streams. I use a 6' or 7' 2wt rod UNDERLINED with 1wt line and have never had any problems presenting flies whether it be a micro bugger,dry dropper or a straight dry. It works for me so that's what I use. In Staggers case he is better off casting as many rods,reel and line combos as he can to see what he likes but knowing him and spending a few sessions with him working on his casting. He needs a REALLY fast rod to match his casting stroke.

Posted on: 2012/10/23 13:40


Re: 7'6 Rod

Joined:
2011/5/15 15:14
From Scranton
Posts: 85
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I bought an eagle claw featherlight last year from wally world for like 20 bucks. (The yellow glass one not the crappy black graphite) Its a 7'6 5wt. Before I built a 7ft 3wt that was the rod I used for brookie fishing. A lil overpowered but enough backbone to fight bigger fish if I was on different water. May be something to consider.

Posted on: 2012/10/23 14:24


Re: 7'6 Rod

Joined:
2012/3/22 8:26
From Couldn't Care Less
Posts: 5620
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Good stuff and I really appreciate it. I am going to try to cast a few early next month and see what i like .. going to go with a rod and reel.

Pcray .. that day on VC I used ur rod for a 10 mins when you were untangling and rigging me up. It felt comfortable .. what was the combo?

Quote:
DD wrote:

In Staggers case he is better off casting as many rods,reel and line combos as he can to see what he likes but knowing him and spending a few sessions with him working on his casting. He needs a REALLY fast rod to match his casting stroke.


What exactly do you mean by "Really fast rod" and I'm scared to ask if that is good or bad?


//FYI, guys who don't know me .. I spend most of my time on the newbie board where all dumb questions are encouraged

Posted on: 2012/10/24 15:27
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Re: 7'6 Rod

Joined:
2008/1/31 17:19
From Pretty much everywhere at some point, Thorndale today.
Posts: 13599
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Stagger, I don't remember what I carried that day, actually. Most commonly on Valley I carry an 8 ft 5 wt, with 5 wt line. Bought that rod from k-bob. I sometimes also take a 9 ft 5 wt. Not sure which I had that day.

Valley really isn't a small stream, I'd call it "medium sized", certainly a tweener. For the mountain streams I'd want something a bit shorter. Again, 7'6" is a good length. There will be times when you wish you were carrying something shorter, and times when you wish you were carrying something longer, but for a jack of all trades small stream rod, 7'6" is my recommendation.

Fast vs. slow is the speed of the action. With a slower rod, the rod bends further down the handle, the pause between backcast and forecast has to be longer, and they generally throw more open loops with a softer lay down. A lot of beginners like slower rods because you can feel the rod load better, and thus time the forward cast better. A faster rod gives you better line speed, more distance, more accuracy, and throws tighter loops. You can simply put more power into it.

In general terms you can think of it as the stiffness of the rod, a ultra slow rod is like a wet noodle, an ultra fast rod like a broomstick (exaggerations of course). For small streams I recommend faster rods, tight loops are important in brush, and you frequently have to put a lot of power into a very short casting stroke. There are differing opinions, especially those into the fight, as you feel the fish more with a slower rod.

Light line weights are generally slower. They don't have to be but that's the rule of thumb. That's all fine and good when throwing size 28 midges and 26 tricos, but it's a disadvantage when trying to power a size 12 attractor through a rhododendron tunnel to fish that don't care about drag.

Posted on: 2012/10/24 15:45


Re: 7'6 Rod

Joined:
2010/6/19 16:43
From Clinton County, Pa.
Posts: 1814
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A fast rod has nothing to do with accuracy. It's the caster that's accurate not the rod.

Posted on: 2012/10/24 17:56
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"Even the thousandth trip to the same familiar stream begins with renewed hope and unfailing faith." ZANE GREY


Re: 7'6 Rod

Joined:
2009/12/2 19:56
From SE Pa
Posts: 328
Offline
Lots of people will tell you that the Cabela's Three Forks 7'6" is a super rod for the money. Can't get a better rod for $49 bucks and you'll fall in love with using a smaller rod. If you're strictly using it for small creeks, don't be afraid to put a 4wt line on it - will make tight casting even easier.

http://www.cabelas.com/product/Fishin ... t104764680%3Bcat105573780

Guaranteed there will be nay-sayers, but hey, lots of people love them.

Posted on: 2012/10/24 18:31



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