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a few dry flys

Joined:
2012/8/20 23:10
From Southwestern NY
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white wulf kinda thing

Resized Image
Untitled by dj.berg, on Flickr

peacock wulf sort of lol

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Untitled by dj.berg, on Flickr

and the whole reason i sat at the vise last night, saturday while out brookie fishing i was loving the float of a foam beetle, lost the two i had and then pcray gave me a few wulf's to try out, and that became this:

Resized Image
Untitled by dj.berg, on Flickr

Posted on: 2013/6/26 9:50


Re: a few dry flys

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2011/6/29 9:38
From Philadelphia
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Size 16 Stimulators are my brook trout fly of choice. Floats like a cork, wear like iron and can be used with 4X tippet.

Posted on: 2013/6/26 10:53

Edited by Foxgap239 on 2013/6/26 11:35:44


Re: a few dry flys

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2007/4/8 20:43
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What made Wulff-style flies "Wulff-style" was the use of bucktail for the tail and the wings.

The hair made them resiliant and high floating, along with the double wrapped hackle.

Taking lessons from Lee Wulff fly designs, you've done a better job of mimicing his skater-styled flies, which are basically grossly oversized, very stiff, hackles wrapped around the front of the hook only, with some versions utilizing a bucktail tailing section.

You would need to use a siffer hackle, a smaller hook, and wind it tighter to mimic that.

What you've come up here are closer to a wingless wet fly, which was sometimes tied with cockerel hackle, being stiffer than the traditional webby gamebird stuff but not as stiff as cock feathers.

They'll fish in the film until utterly water logged, then right beneath it.

Posted on: 2013/6/26 14:30
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Re: a few dry flys

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2012/8/20 23:10
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so after a bit of time sitting and googling...

Quote:
Size 16 Stimulators are my brook trout fly of choice. Floats like a cork, wear like iron and can be used with 4X tippet.


i see, gonna try a few tomorrow night for saturday's adventure, thanks for the tip, and yeah seems like it wold be almost impossible to sink!


Quote:
What made Wulff-style flies "Wulff-style" was the use of bucktail for the tail and the wings. The hair made them resiliant and high floating, along with the double wrapped hackle. Taking lessons from Lee Wulff fly designs, you've done a better job of mimicing his skater-styled flies, which are basically grossly oversized, very stiff, hackles wrapped around the front of the hook only, with some versions utilizing a bucktail tailing section. You would need to use a siffer hackle, a smaller hook, and wind it tighter to mimic that. What you've come up here are closer to a wingless wet fly, which was sometimes tied with cockerel hackle, being stiffer than the traditional webby gamebird stuff but not as stiff as cock feathers. They'll fish in the film until utterly water logged, then right beneath it.


thanks for the seriously informative response, yeah i've got tons to learn about feathers. and i still think i'm using the right feathers, but my main issue was pretty much wooly boogering them in the wrap partitions of the peacock herl, thus obviously spaced way to far apart. and i'll throw a wing in ther for ya as well.

and one other question which will float longer? antron yarn straight wrapped, antron yarn dubbed on(seems like it would float awesome until it took on water), or a fur dubbing? still trying to figure out a thorax material for a white wulff. and again thanks for the information.

Posted on: 2013/6/27 22:56


Re: a few dry flys

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Antron wicks water, ergo antron is the worst choice. If you're making posts from a synthetic, you use poly yarn.

Animal fur is different. Some are more resistant to water logging than others. The general rule of thumb is if you're making a floating fly, you want the fur of a water mammal (beaver, etc). If you'e making a fly that sinks, then a land mammal (rabbit).


Posted on: 2013/6/27 23:51
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Re: a few dry flys

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yeah sadly i usually tie with what ever i have in my collection of materials. and i'm thinking i wanna try to find(ive seen them) multi colors of dubbing in one dispenser type thing. and maybe if it wount be $100 in natural fibers as well...

but for now i need to find some white beaver...

Posted on: 2013/6/28 7:28


Re: a few dry flys

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Superfine dry fly is superior to beaver.

A $5 rabbit skin from the craft store and the proper use of thread underbody provides for most anything that sinks.

Posted on: 2013/6/28 8:30
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Re: a few dry flys

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2006/9/11 13:33
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Quote:

gfen wrote:

Superfine dry fly is superior to beaver.


This is what happens when you drive a Honda Element.

Not all beaver dubbing is created equal. The stuff you get in the typical assortment box sucks. If you ever used Rumpf beaver dubbing, you'd understand.

There's another joke in there somewhere.

Posted on: 2013/6/28 8:43
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Re: a few dry flys

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If I haven't used snowshoe fur, then its been Superfine. I've got a couple packs of beaver I've inherited from someone, and the Superfine is superior in every way I can tell.

I've always been under the assumption it was polypropylene, and thus inherently hydrophobic.

Its also very easy to use due to the fiber length and thinness, so you're able to actually see the base colour and not glob it on.

Posted on: 2013/6/28 9:04
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Re: a few dry flys

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2006/9/21 0:02
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Yeah - my first thought after reading DJBerg's last post, was that maybe he was looking for something else.

Anyway, the best natural stuff I've used is the beaver dubbing from mad river dubbing co. It's very fine with no guard hairs. Goes on the thread easy and makes really nice bodies.
I don't recall seeing it in white though

Posted on: 2013/6/28 9:20


Re: a few dry flys

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2010/4/18 14:05
From pennsylvania
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Quote:

gfen wrote:

If I haven't used snowshoe fur, then its been Superfine...
...Its also very easy to use due to the fiber length and thinness...


Plastic dubbing from a traditionalist? I'm shocked.

Try Nature's Spirit Fine Natural Dubbing.
It can be applied even thinner than "Superfine" and, when wet, has a great translucent appearance that polypropylene lacks entirely.

This is how it starts... Next thing you know, you'll be using a boron rod and a Lamson reel...

Posted on: 2013/6/28 9:33
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Re: a few dry flys
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2006/9/11 8:26
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DJB,

The link below is like a phd dissertation on dubbing (both the noun and the verb). Very useful for any fly tyer.

Dubbing

Posted on: 2013/6/28 9:37


Re: a few dry flys

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2012/8/20 23:10
From Southwestern NY
Posts: 453
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Quote:
The link below is like a phd dissertation on dubbing (both the noun and the verb). Very useful for any fly tyer.


holy WOW! thanks, that should get me up to date on this stuff !!!

thanks a ton.

Posted on: 2013/6/28 11:38


Re: a few dry flys

Joined:
2012/8/20 23:10
From Southwestern NY
Posts: 453
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gfen. some thing more like this? i haven't found any tutorials on wulffs that dont have a peacock herl body but i was tying, or more attempting to tie stimulators and decided to try a deer hair body white wulff style fly.

*also it's a b*tch not to cut the tail this way, not very coordinated with a double edge razor...

Resized Image
Untitled by dj.berg, on Flickr

Posted on: 2013/6/29 10:55


Re: a few dry flys

Joined:
2007/3/3 1:06
Posts: 352
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Quote:

afishinado wrote:
DJB,

The link below is like a phd dissertation on dubbing (both the noun and the verb). Very useful for any fly tyer.

Dubbing


You were not kidding swhen you said a phd dissertation on dubbing......that is some very useful stuff and more than I imagined on dubbing!

Posted on: 2013/6/29 15:59



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