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Re: The "dreaded" Mop Fly

Joined:
2006/9/9 11:22
From New Castle, PA
Posts: 402
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Lots of dumb stuff catches plenty of fish.

It seems half our popular nymphs are nothing but flashy materials now.

The only problem with the so called "junk" flies like mop flies, squirmy worms, etc. is that some anglers are so overcome by the novelty of catching fish on a piece of a mop, that the fly's effectiveness becomes exaggerated. I think this effect really hurts newer fisherman as it leads them to overlook diversifying their repertoire of fishing techniques and fly patterns. I've seen guys who have nothing but green weenies, mop flies, sucker spawn, and SJW's in their boxes. Sure, these flies catch fish and the anglers can certainly do fine for a few weeks in the spring, but I really think they are setting themselves up for boom or bust fishing trips.

Posted on: 12/30 2:09


Re: The "dreaded" Mop Fly

Joined:
2006/9/21 0:02
From Pittsburgh
Posts: 806
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I have vivid memories of a funny incident that happened when I was just getting started in fly fishing.
My "mentor" took me to fisherman's paradise for the first time.
It was a very warm, sunny day, in early summer. The water was already quite low and clear. And the fishing was slow as molasses.
Nothing hatching or rising at all. And neither of us moved a fish for hours.
Then, a couple - with a small child - pulled into the gravel lot across from the hatchery. They went up on the bridge over the creek there,
and started throwing bread into the water. And watched as the fish went nuts over it - many of them quite large.
We had some fly tying stuff with us, and my buddy got it out. And quickly whipped out a few "bread" ties - made with white yarn. (I didn't tie yet)
We got back on the water and had a ball - until the fish got onto the fake bread, anyway.
Now that's the ultimate junk fly!

Posted on: 12/30 9:09


Re: The "dreaded" Mop Fly

Joined:
2014/3/7 21:11
From Dauphin County
Posts: 94
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Last year in a sulphur hatch, I could not buy a hit on top. Fish weren’t rising either. I tied on a mop fly and they literally charged it fighting to get there first. My lesson wasn’t “mop flies are awesome” but more “switch it up even if you think you know what they want. “


Posted on: 12/30 9:33


Re: The "dreaded" Mop Fly

Joined:
2010/9/1 13:55
From State College PA
Posts: 146
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They work well in summer not just because of inchworms. I fish honeybun-like flies and I am convinced they make a better cranefly larvae (which are quite active in the summer) than an inchworm. Hard to know what color trout see. green to us may look very different to them. These flies are twice as effective in sections heavily populated with crane flies. There are two sections of the J with particularly heavy CFs and I start with this pattern. So, these types of flies are no more of a junk fly than a caddis larvae IMO.

Posted on: 12/30 9:43


Re: The "dreaded" Mop Fly
Moderator
Joined:
2006/9/9 19:16
From Dallastown, PA
Posts: 1255
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I agree with the craneflys larvae reference. But I have to share this. Once a few years ago on a small stream I was doing work on, it required a pump around. So when the coffer area was dried up and only a few puddles remained, there was a refuge of craneflys larvae. My laborer pointed it out. There were dozens in a pool the size of a garbage can lid. A little less than an inch long and cigar shaped. (Think Walt’s worm)well after I explained this stage of life in such a small adult, I picked up a few and took them to the moving water and tossed them in one at a time. Upon hitting the water they’d flatten out like a ribbon and expend their body to >2”. Undulating/swimming like a piece of seaweed. They looked more like a piece of chamois than a mop. Interesting. In fact it reminded me of Padraics San Juan chamois worm from back in the day.

Another unconventional aquatic profile I witnessed was a giant black stonefly. Pulled one off a rock once and after examining its proportions and details I tossed it in a shallow, moderate run. It curled up into a ball like a potato bug as it moved downstream.

So maybe the trouts think the mop fly in purple are giant stones.

Same with mayfly nymphs, they seem to curl their abdomens back into a curl.

Weird wacky stuff.

Now ya know.

Posted on: 12/30 9:59
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Re: The "dreaded" Mop Fly

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2014/3/23 20:12
Posts: 277
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Maurice: No doubt we over think the trouts' eating habits. I think this is because we see the highly selective feeding behavior during a decent hatch and we extrapolate that to all-the-time eating behavior.

There is a dvd series called "The Underwater World of Trout" (Underwater Oz Productions). One germane segment shows underwater footage of trout in feeding and prime lies during non-hatch times. The trout taste most things that float by and eject non-food items withing a second or so.

The dvd series also shows how trout see underwater. This is relevant to approach (cone of vision) and presentation (how far upstream to present a dry, for example).

IMO, this highlights the premium on approach, presentation, and strike detection over pattern selection. This is why standards like HE and PT (et al) are perennial trout takers.

This is, of course, situational. For example, freshly stocked trout and highly pressured trout will likely not behave this way. Also, limestone trout that have an abundance of staple food sources like scuds and cress bugs will focus on things in the drift that resemble these.

I highly recommend these videos to anyone who wants to better understand trout behavior. Fascinating stuff!

Posted on: 12/30 11:27


Re: The "dreaded" Mop Fly

Joined:
2006/9/21 0:02
From Pittsburgh
Posts: 806
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I think the reason a mop fly works so well, is the action.
If it's tied right - with much of the "tail" extending off the hook - it really has a live appearance when falling down to the stream bottom. Or being retrieved back

Posted on: 12/30 22:10


Re: The "dreaded" Mop Fly

Joined:
2014/2/19 19:02
From Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 89
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I think it depends on the size of the mop piece. The small pieces, I call them mini-mops, work well as nymph type flies. Green rock worms, small blood worms, small crane fly larvae. They're about a 1/2 inch or less long. There's medium pieces, 1 to 2 inches long where you get some action. They seem to work well for pan fish and trout. You get your best action with large pieces, 2 to 3 inches long. I've done well with bass on this size fly. I'm beginning to realize that you need to think outside the box when using mop pieces. Get away from the idea they're only good for crane fly larvae. There's a thread on the Fly Tying Forum(http://www.flytyingforum.com) in the Fly Tying Bench section called "Mop Fly Variants" Some very interesting usages for mop pieces. There's the usual side bars within the thread but lots of interesting patterns.

Posted on: 12/31 20:56


Re: The "dreaded" Mop Fly

Joined:
2007/10/7 0:44
From philadelphia
Posts: 212
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I think mop fliesmake sense too,when you in that situation fishing for steel ,where you lose a fly every few minutes.

Posted on: 1/1 23:36


Re: The "dreaded" Mop Fly

Joined:
2006/9/9 11:22
From New Castle, PA
Posts: 402
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Quote:

shakey wrote:
I think mop fliesmake sense too,when you in that situation fishing for steel ,where you lose a fly every few minutes.


That's really true of pretty much all egg patterns too though. Sucker spawn are practically free if you tie your own.

Posted on: 1/2 1:33


Re: The "dreaded" Mop Fly

Joined:
2006/9/21 0:02
From Pittsburgh
Posts: 806
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Yeah - it's definitely one of the cheapest flies one could tie.

A bought a car wash mitt at an auto parts store to get my materiel.
However, a few days later, my wife told me that they sell them at the local dollar store

Posted on: 1/2 9:19


Re: The "dreaded" Mop Fly

Joined:
2010/3/29 6:56
From cambria county
Posts: 307
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It kills me to say this but a cream color mop fly is by far the best fly for brookies. LOL

I have a love hate relationship with mop flies. I like to try and tie patterns that mimic what lives in the stream. I can stretch them to maybe a crane fly, or a very chubby caddis larva. I don't really toss many of them, I used to be on the side of not liking squirmies, mops, eggs, suckers pawn, and things like that. But what the heck as long as it is not dipped in garlic or something it is still a fly.

I don't use flies like that, very often, but every once in a while, feel like giving them a go. I will say that the cream colored mop has got to be the top producer of those I have chucked.

Posted on: 1/3 15:05
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Re: The "dreaded" Mop Fly

Joined:
2014/3/23 20:12
Posts: 277
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Mike: Do you tie in a contrasting colored head on the fly or just tie the cream colored mop on the hook?

Posted on: 1/3 16:12


Re: The "dreaded" Mop Fly

Joined:
2013/2/25 11:38
From NW Pa
Posts: 50
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Ok so it's confession time. Last year I tied several mop flies mainly for use on stockies because I liked the action. Bought the car wash mitt in grey just like the video and tied them with some black hen hackle.

Used them a couple times here in PA the first few weeks with moderate success, usually as the last resort but wasn't too impressed.

Went out west to Yellowstone and was fishing Slough creek near the VIP hole where the fish are notoriously selective and highly pressured by the time I fished it (late August). While waiting for the evening hatch activity in the early afternoon rather than just laying on ther bank watching the scenery discovered I had a couple of these "junk" flies in my boxes so figured why not try them.

Only had three of them with me so I waded in and tried a low and slow roll on the bottom with them. To my surprise, on the second or third cast a large cut hammered the fly and broke me off (probably because I had little anticipation or confidence that these things might work). Tied on another and proceded to hook and land two 18" and a 21" cutthroat within an hour. By that time some sporadic rises were appearing and it was back to the dry flies.

They should consider renaming the fly the American Express.....don't leave home without it!


Posted on: 1/5 11:10



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