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Re: using bedrock geology info to fish in acidrain areas

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2009/7/29 10:25
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I looked at the tables for some NEPA regions, and eyeballing the numbers for those areas it looks like Juniata and Clinton VG, Catskill G, Mauch chunk and Pottsville G-, Pocono and Tuscarora low buffering. no magic numbers, but another thing to consider w drainage area and gradient etc in choosing streams to try using maps...

Posted on: 6/24 17:58


Re: using bedrock geology info to fish in acidrain areas

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4/6 22:55
From Benton, PA
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Sounds like me and PAgeologist had the same professors in college.

Don't forget the all-inclusive suburbia runoff...the bane of our existence. You never know what else might be in a drainage basin if it's within a stream's borders.

Posted on: 6/24 20:50
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Re: using bedrock geology info to fish in acidrain areas

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Interesting example many of us know: the east branch fishing creek and its tribs, in a SGL just west of Ricketts. Those streams mostly originate in Huntley (pink) and Burgoon (blue) bedrock, which according to the taylor book table for that region, are low in buffering capacity there. Streams just west are in Catskill (yellow) bedrock, which may be better/higher buffering in that area. I know a few streams 'round there with just slightly different headwaters bedrock, and a few more fish than some EBFC tribs. Headwaters geo seems particularly important versus downstream bedrock.

Interesting that acid rain/bedrock geology issues may suppress fish populations miles from a road, and with zero fishing pressure. Still, looking at geology might help me avoid some of those long walks to areas w/o many fish in the future. :)


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Posted on: 6/25 9:28

Edited by k-bob on 2014/6/25 10:01:55
Edited by k-bob on 2014/6/25 10:06:39
Edited by k-bob on 2014/6/25 10:07:21
Edited by k-bob on 2014/6/25 10:16:12
Edited by k-bob on 2014/6/25 10:16:34
Edited by k-bob on 2014/6/25 10:16:52


Re: using bedrock geology info to fish in acidrain areas

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4/6 22:55
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Interesting that Muncy Creek is a Catskill drainage basin.

I would argue that headwater geology matters more important for water pH because the majority of these freestone streams have rain as their primary source. Rain falls onto the long-eroded (via plants and trees) ground and rock, and seeps those acidic qualities into the water.

Bedrock further downstream has much less surface area over a stream's water capacity than does the ground that the rain made first contact.

Groundwater sources (usually come from limestone) are more suited for supporting trout populations.

Posted on: 6/25 13:26
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Re: using bedrock geology info to fish in acidrain areas

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thanks DF, story here about raven run in anf affected by acid rain in remote location:

http://www.patrout.org/docs/newslette ... t_winter2014.pdf?sfvrsn=2

Posted on: 6/25 13:56


Re: using bedrock geology info to fish in acidrain areas

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Outstanding article. This past week I've spent so many hours discussing acid rain for the environmental class because it's such a big issue here in PA.

Unfortunately, there's really not much we can do about it, except turn off the factories along the Mississippi Valley.

Posted on: 6/25 14:39
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Re: using bedrock geology info to fish in acidrain areas

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Quote:

duckfoot wrote:
Outstanding article. This past week I've spent so many hours discussing acid rain for the environmental class because it's such a big issue here in PA.

Unfortunately, there's really not much we can do about it, except turn off the factories along the Mississippi Valley.


About 30% of coal burning power plants in the US still do not have scrubbers.

Getting scrubbers on those plants would help.

Posted on: 6/25 15:11


Re: using bedrock geology info to fish in acidrain areas

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Quote:

troutbert wrote:
[quote]
About 30% of coal burning power plants in the US still do not have scrubbers.
Getting scrubbers on those plants would help.


#@$%^ right. SO2 is the #1 killer.

Posted on: 6/25 15:23
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Re: using bedrock geology info to fish in acidrain areas

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2013/5/28 12:09
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Also, dont forget that the majority of the rock formations are comprised of several different rock types and are sometimes a couple thousand feet thick. It also may depend on what bed or series of beds the groundwater or stream is in. There are many formations especially in western PA (see the Conemaugh group and the Monongahela group) that have everything from highly acidic sandstone, shale, and coal to limestone.

Posted on: 6/25 15:49
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Re: using bedrock geology info to fish in acidrain areas

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2009/2/19 19:59
From Mont Co, Pa
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Quote:

PAgeologist wrote:
Look for iron/sulfur deposits leaching out from any outcrops or red/orange/yellow staining of rocks.


Is this what you're referring to? This is at the base of the Rt 80 bridge over Hayes/Black Creek (Carbon). I've seen this not so nice looking stuff on a few wild streams. I think I was told it's not an issue?

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Posted on: 6/25 18:43
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Re: using bedrock geology info to fish in acidrain areas

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That looks like some iron/sulfur deposits. It doesn't neccessarily indicate a large problem. A lot of seeps are small compared to the stream they flow into and get buffered out/diluted pretty fast. Some streams may have a small dead zone below the seep until it gets diluted enough.

Posted on: 6/25 20:26
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Re: using bedrock geology info to fish in acidrain areas

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2006/9/13 10:18
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Bob, USGS has wells where they record things like the levels, and other stuff for PA. One of the things they record is PH. I'm not sure how to enter the info they require to bring up the info you want, but I'm sure you can figure it out.

Posted on: 6/25 22:43
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Re: using bedrock geology info to fish in acidrain areas

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It is a cool topic, I've looked at the maps at times and found correlations. i.e. in a given area good streams come out of this formation, and the ones that cross this other formation tend to be bad. I haven't quite gotten to the point of searching new streams based on it, but I should. I still find it really interesting.

As for the glacial till in NY state mentioned on the last page, there is a similar region in NW PA. Upper Brokenstraw drainage, around Corry and in that area. Yeah, it leads to water chemistries very similar to limestone. The streams are good in terms of water chem, and if near a spring, temp too. But the structure isn't the best in that area. Those springs are in nasty, swamp, quicksandy type places.

Posted on: 6/26 11:47


Re: using bedrock geology info to fish in acidrain areas

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2012/9/30 21:12
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Add me to the list of the interested people.
It was definitely cool to see the correlation between creeks I know to be good, and the geology.
Will definitely use this to help prioritize creeks on my list to check out.

Posted on: 6/26 13:26


Re: using bedrock geology info to fish in acidrain areas

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2013/5/28 12:09
From Lilly, PA
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I have done several water quality surveys along streams in NW PA. They are a mess to walk along but have great water quality where AMD isnt present.

Posted on: 6/26 15:24
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