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good article on brookie restoration (w/ image of WVA brookie, big as a largemouth)

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http://www.nature.com/scitable/knowle ... rout-restoration-83031062

is that fisherman with the brookie ... a much younger chaz? :)

Posted on: 2013/2/15 14:51

Edited by k-bob on 2013/2/15 15:34:53
Edited by k-bob on 2013/2/15 15:37:56


Re: good article on brookie restoration (w/ image of WVA brookie, big as a largemouth)

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Look at the size of that brookie from back in 1900! That's a monster.

Posted on: 2013/2/15 15:26


Re: good article on brookie restoration (w/ image of WVA brookie, big as a largemouth)
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Thanks K-bob - good stuff.
Yeah, that photo is striking - fish appears to be well over twenty inches and maybe five pounds?

Posted on: 2013/2/16 8:03

Edited by Fishidiot on 2013/2/21 11:27:01


Re: good article on brookie restoration (w/ image of WVA brookie, big as a largemouth)

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Will/could we ever see brookies like that again? Did we ever have brookies like that in PA?

Posted on: 2013/2/19 13:49


Re: good article on brookie restoration (w/ image of WVA brookie, big as a largemouth)

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See that's what you catch on size 6 streamers.

Posted on: 2013/2/19 16:44


Re: good article on brookie restoration (w/ image of WVA brookie, big as a largemouth)

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Please don't rehash that one again, that is one beast of a brookie.

Posted on: 2013/2/19 16:58
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Re: good article on brookie restoration (w/ image of WVA brookie, big as a largemouth)

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Lol....sorry guy.

Posted on: 2013/2/19 18:57


Re: good article on brookie restoration (w/ image of WVA brookie, big as a largemouth)
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Quote:

k-bob wrote:
http://www.nature.com/scitable/knowle ... rout-restoration-83031062

is that fisherman with the brookie ... a much younger chaz? :)


Photoshop!

Posted on: 2013/2/19 19:10
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Re: good article on brookie restoration (w/ image of WVA brookie, big as a largemouth)

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I will never know, but I am not sure that really big brookies would be fun to fish for .... On the other hand, what would that brookie do to a dry fly?

Posted on: 2013/2/19 20:12


Re: good article on brookie restoration (w/ image of WVA brookie, big as a largemouth)

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That's something I'd love to find out!

Posted on: 2013/2/19 20:19
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Re: good article on brookie restoration (w/ image of WVA brookie, big as a largemouth)

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Quote:

The_Sasquatch wrote:
Will/could we ever see brookies like that again? Did we ever have brookies like that in PA?

I doubt we'll see them again, but we certainly did have natives like that many years ago. Pick up a copy of The Vanishing Trout and you'll read stories of many large natives being caught in Pa before the logging and the coal extraction.
I'm sure brookies as big as the one in that pic were still pretty rare though, that's a monster!

Posted on: 2013/2/20 9:39
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Re: good article on brookie restoration (w/ image of WVA brookie, big as a largemouth)

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I have done a fair amount of research on the brook trout of Pennsylvania. We did grow them up to about 20 inches in the past, both in the limestone streams and our large freestone streams.
Brookies in the limestone streams got big - just as brown trout do today - because the water stayed cold year round and there was plenty of food. When brown trout were introduced into these streams they took to them very well...too well, because they almost completely displaced the brookies. Not entirely though; we still have some pretty fair-sized brookies in Fishing Creek where both species thrive.

The story of the big freestones is a little more complicated: According to old angling literature, brookies living in these streams only spent about half their time in the big water. As the big streams warmed in the summer they would move upstream into tributaries and headwaters where the water stayed cold. And you can bet they survived by eating little brookies as they went. After spawning in the fall they moved back downstream to the bigger waters to winter over. They fed heavily on minnows and crayfish and the massive spring hatches. This gave them an advantage over the upstream fish and allowed them to reach sizes we can only imagine today. Foot-long brookies were not unusual.

The massive logging of the forests obviously caused this life-cycle to become much less viable. I do wonder, however, what would happen if we stopped stocking and plundering some of these lower stream reaches for a while. I have caught native brookies all the way down to the swimming hole at Ole Bull Park as late as mid-June, and they seemed to be doing just fine And stocked trout do just fine during the period (October - June) when the old-time brookies once utilized these waters.



Posted on: 2013/2/20 15:55


Re: good article on brookie restoration (w/ image of WVA brookie, big as a largemouth)
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Ken,

Stockng was much more widespread back then and the limit was 50 then 25 up to the 70's. before it went down to 12 then 8 I believe and now 5. And this in direct correlation with reduced stocking numbers.

Help me understand why when stocking was greater and limits 10 fold over today that big fish were able to escape the opening day gauntlet.

I don't disagree that stocking encourages cropping of wild pop. I see it in our watershed with wild browns being rarely caught over 12" because every year the onslaught of anglers harvest fish of any size over the 7" limit. Even if they survive a year or two over the size limit they are cheating death with each year of growth where harvest is likely due to stocking.




Posted on: 2013/2/20 23:45
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Re: good article on brookie restoration (w/ image of WVA brookie, big as a largemouth)

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I think the really large brookies were caught in streams in remote places, before the streams were stocked.

It's very likely the really large brookies were gone even long before the streams were stocked. Probably as soon as there was much access or a few settlers in the area, the really large brookies disappeared.

In PA, there was a really large logging boom in the 1880s, when logging locomotives became available and logging railroads were extended all out through the big woods.

My guess is that there were still some large brookies being caught in NC PA into the 1880s, while there was still some remote places left, but that was the era when the big woods was getting removed at a rapid rate, so that's probably around the time when the era of the really big brookies was also coming to an end.

Posted on: 2013/2/21 9:31


Re: good article on brookie restoration (w/ image of WVA brookie, big as a largemouth)
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Quote:

troutbert wrote:
I think the really large brookies were caught in streams in remote places, before the streams were stocked.

It's very likely the really large brookies were gone even long before the streams were stocked. Probably as soon as there was much access or a few settlers in the area, the really large brookies disappeared.

In PA, there was a really large logging boom in the 1880s, when logging locomotives became available and logging railroads were extended all out through the big woods.

My guess is that there were still some large brookies being caught in NC PA into the 1880s, while there was still some remote places left, but that was the era when the big woods was getting removed at a rapid rate, so that's probably around the time when the era of the really big brookies was also coming to an end.


Agreed.
It's worth remembering that, by about 1900 as Troutbert points out, much of the forest was gone and there had been a generation of anglers pounding the streams and stocking was prevalent, all made possible by railroads. Although I'd like to believe this is a wild fish and that they were still prevalent in this size a century ago.... there's a good chance it's just a big stockie much like those one can see nowadays in any small town PA newspaper early in the trout season.

Posted on: 2013/2/21 11:25



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