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Re: who is a successful nymph fisherman?

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2009/9/14 12:48
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Quote:
Speaking of George and nymphing, doesn't he have a book coming out in the near future?


He does. I've seen the early copies, and it looks great. Title is "Dynamic Nymphing":

http://www.amazon.com/Dynamic-Nymphing-George-Daniel/dp/0811707415

It is pretty funny how infrequently he is referred to by his actual name, George Daniel. Why does everyone want to add an "s"?

Posted on: 2011/11/15 9:37


Re: who is a successful nymph fisherman?

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2008/1/31 17:19
From Pretty much everywhere at some point, Thorndale today.
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Surface currents are basically always faster than bottom currents. If a surface indicator is not dragging, that means the nymphs below are being dragged along the bottom faster than the bottom currents. If you want your nymphs to travel at the speed of the flow, the flies need move at a speed slower than the surface current.


This is one reason I don't use floats if I can get away with it. That said, I can't always get away with it, and do sometimes use floats.

One thing I do when using a float is to "check" the float. It's basically that once you sense that the float is too far downstream of the nymph and is or will soon be dragging it, move the float upstream a little. Most of the time it's simply throwing a mend in the line out as far as the float, you throw it upstream a bit.

The disadvantage, of course, is that you are putting a little slack between the float and the nymph, which hurts strike detection. There's always that trade-off. Tight line = better strike detection but imparting some drag.

One thing that helps lessen the trade-off is making sure that all subsurface line is thin diameter. Don't sink your butts. That means short or absent butts and tapers, with long tippets. The fine diameter cuts through the current better, thus reducing drag, while still giving you sensitivity.

When going indicator-less, it's really amazing how slow the drift should be, you have to kind of see it to understand. The nymph needs to be truly just rolling along the bottom.

Posted on: 2011/11/15 9:57


Re: who is a successful nymph fisherman?

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2007/1/2 11:55
From Bozeman
Posts: 19932
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Because the version with an s sounds more like a last name, and the incorrect version has become a meme.

Posted on: 2011/11/15 12:21


Re: who is a successful nymph fisherman?

Joined:
2009/10/15 13:45
From Eastern PA
Posts: 10290
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Quote:

midnightangler wrote:
Quote:
Speaking of George and nymphing, doesn't he have a book coming out in the near future?


He does. I've seen the early copies, and it looks great. Title is "Dynamic Nymphing":

http://www.amazon.com/Dynamic-Nymphing-George-Daniel/dp/0811707415

It is pretty funny how infrequently he is referred to by his actual name, George Daniel. Why does everyone want to add an "s"?


"Look inside the cover" on Amazon gives an idea of the books content.

http://www.amazon.com/Dynamic-Nymphing-George-Daniel/dp/0811707415

Posted on: 2011/11/15 12:32


Re: who is a successful nymph fisherman?
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2006/9/11 8:26
From Chester County
Posts: 8944
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Quote:

pcray1231 wrote:
Quote:
Surface currents are basically always faster than bottom currents. If a surface indicator is not dragging, that means the nymphs below are being dragged along the bottom faster than the bottom currents. If you want your nymphs to travel at the speed of the flow, the flies need move at a speed slower than the surface current.


This is one reason I don't use floats if I can get away with it. That said, I can't always get away with it, and do sometimes use floats.

One thing I do when using a float is to "check" the float. It's basically that once you sense that the float is too far downstream of the nymph and is or will soon be dragging it, move the float upstream a little. Most of the time it's simply throwing a mend in the line out as far as the float, you throw it upstream a bit.

The disadvantage, of course, is that you are putting a little slack between the float and the nymph, which hurts strike detection. There's always that trade-off. Tight line = better strike detection but imparting some drag.

One thing that helps lessen the trade-off is making sure that all subsurface line is thin diameter. Don't sink your butts. That means short or absent butts and tapers, with long tippets. The fine diameter cuts through the current better, thus reducing drag, while still giving you sensitivity.

When going indicator-less, it's really amazing how slow the drift should be, you have to kind of see it to understand. The nymph needs to be truly just rolling along the bottom.



Agree with the above. Like Pat, I seldom use an indy, except when I fish across multiple current speeds in a larger river or stream and mend to the indicator. Most times I apply paste floatant to my furled leader, and use flouro colored line and/or a dab or strike putty for visibility. With a "sighter" rather than an indy, I can control the depth by the type cast I make and/or changing the rod angle rather than movng the indy up and down.

As far fishing an indy and "checking", I only do so when trying to achieve more depth on the drift. The most important thing that I do is balance the rig with an indy. By balance I mean add enough weight to get the fly in the zone at the bottom. The weight of the rig counteracts the drag of the indy on the surface.

To get into the zone use all tippet behind the indy, get the length right (no more than 2x the water depth) and adjust the drift with weight. When this is achieved, you will see your indy traveling slower than the current since the current at the bottom is slower than it is on the surface. The fly is riding close to the bottom in the zone where I want the fly to be and there is no slack between my fly and my indy.

I like to use weighted flies and tie them in different weights for better strike detection. I may add a split shot if necessary and I often use tungsten putty to make fine adjustment to balance the rig.

Posted on: 2011/11/16 7:12


Re: who is a successful nymph fisherman?

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2008/3/20 22:15
Posts: 1789
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There is no setting one teacher above another every one learns differently and until you really open yourself up you'll learn just one way from one teacher. When you are really awake you will learn everything from them and make it your own.

I love nymphing because there is a close connection for me when doing it.

Not a ton of advice as far as indicators, I just don't use thingabobbers or putty. I just have other things from one teacher and another.

I still suck if that makes anyone feel better. LOL!

Posted on: 2011/11/22 22:18


Re: who is a successful nymph fisherman?

Joined:
2010/6/26 11:19
From Along the Lehigh Above the Gap
Posts: 7098
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O just to many jokes can be used after that post

Speaking of George Daniel...The newbies on here might be interested in learning from him hands on. The Western Pocono TU will be having a pig roast on Memorial Day in May and everybody is invited. George will be there the whole day and will be doing an on stream presentation and video presentation. This might be one of the cheapest and best times to learn from one of the best.

Posted on: 2011/11/23 10:16
_________________
"Four of us wolves, running around the desert together, in Las Vegas, looking for strippers and cocaine. So tonight, I make a toast!"

http://bugflingerandfeatherlasher.blogspot.com/



Re: who is a successful nymph fisherman?

Joined:
2009/10/15 13:45
From Eastern PA
Posts: 10290
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Quote:

SBecker wrote:
O just to many jokes can be used after that post

Speaking of George Daniel...The newbies on here might be interested in learning from him hands on. The Western Pocono TU will be having a pig roast on Memorial Day in May and everybody is invited. George will be there the whole day and will be doing an on stream presentation and video presentation. This might be one of the cheapest and best times to learn from one of the best.


Hey Shane, you are probably FB friends with George. As such you are probably aware that someone hijacked the #OOPS# out of his account and as late as a few minutes ago I got super awesome horrible stuff from his account. You may want to let him know.

Posted on: 2011/11/25 22:05


Re: who is a successful nymph fisherman?

Joined:
2010/6/26 11:19
From Along the Lehigh Above the Gap
Posts: 7098
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Done

Posted on: 2011/11/25 22:39
_________________
"Four of us wolves, running around the desert together, in Las Vegas, looking for strippers and cocaine. So tonight, I make a toast!"

http://bugflingerandfeatherlasher.blogspot.com/



Re: who is a successful nymph fisherman?

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2008/3/20 22:15
Posts: 1789
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Quote:

wetnet wrote:
There is no setting one teacher above another every one learns differently and until you really open yourself up you'll learn just one way from one teacher. When you are really awake you will learn everything from them and make it your own.

I love nymphing because there is a close connection for me when doing it.

Not a ton of advice as far as indicators, I just don't use thingabobbers or putty. I just have other things from one teacher and another.

I still suck if that makes anyone feel better. LOL!


Some times there is just not enough damage control.

But I can try. When you have multiple teachers they all have something different to offer. I just think that it's hard to get outside of your comfort zone. You learn new things but still go back to the same old thing anyway, because it's the only way you've really been sucessful. That was my pretty much boring point.

I nymph because I am comfortable with it, can't see a tiny dry to safe my life and am afraid to wade above midwaist. I have made fly fishing my own, when I had back surgery and turtle crawled from rock to rock to fish. Rock fishing.

Posted on: 2011/11/27 20:56



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