Register now on PaFlyFish.com! Login
HOME FORUM BLOG PHOTOS LINKS


Sponsors

Browsing this Thread:   1 Anonymous Users



« 1 (2)


Re: Wooly Buggers and San Juan worms

Joined:
4/13 11:59
From Easton, PA
Posts: 633
Offline
I'll be continuing my quest to catch a bass or a trout on any form of Bugger. When you say On the bottom what are you referring to? If I let these touch the bottom I'm stuck in several feet of Lily pads and milfoil and on the river I'd be snagged in rock and sticks. I guess I'm not working something right, yet, and not giving up.


Quote:

Blackhackle wrote:
San Juan worms are sort of like globugs, if they aren't on the bottom, most of the time they are not very good. At least for me, I find them a seasonal fly: good in the spring and fall, not so good in the summer, have never fished them in the winter. My guess is there is more water in those seasons and more likely to be real worms in the drift. Only color I use is red, #12, 1.5 to 2 inches long. Just a few wraps securing the chenille in the middle so the ends can wave in the current. Almost always fish with a BB split shot or two.

If I could only have one fly it would be a sparsely tied #10 black woollybugger. As other people have mentioned it works best dead drifted along the bottom where the maribou can do its thing. Best in slower or still water. If retrieved slower is better, or a stop and go approach.

I would guess you just haven't been too lucky using both these flies. I am sure you will connect with them.

Posted on: 7/23 22:27


Re: Wooly Buggers and San Juan worms

Joined:
2018/2/19 15:03
From Havelock North, New Zealand
Posts: 11
Offline
Good point, you don't want to be hung up all the time. Depends on the water temperature, but around 6-12 inches. Don't have a lot of experience fishing buggers for stillwater bass, but when I did, fished the edge of weed beds and lily pads and along the bank. If there were largemouths around they would usually take near the bottom on the drop before it got there or with a stop and go retrieve I mentioned earlier. In fishing San Juan worms and globugs you should be ticking the bottom and getting hung up occasionally. Not unusual for trout to pick them both out of the gravel even when stationary. Of course fishing that way you will lose a certain number of flies. All three are simple ties though, have you thought of taking up fly tying?

Posted on: 7/24 4:47


Re: Wooly Buggers and San Juan worms

Joined:
4/13 11:59
From Easton, PA
Posts: 633
Offline
Today another member referred me to one of his favorite sites and, while I liked it, the same flies that I'm paying .62 for they're asking 2.25. I've been wondering if I couldn't do a better job tying myself than what the discount shops do.
I'm in a condensed learning curve. Not particularly a fan of small stream trout fishing I find that the quest for trout sharpens me as a fisherman. The pursuit of trout forces one to pay much much closer attention to hatches, presentation and weather than for, say, Panfish, bass and other. That being said, If I began tying, it will be for panfish. After hitting 9-10" bluegills I've found my passion. And the coolest thing is that in the quest for them I noticed relationships they have with other species. Then of course there is the occasional Bass or Pickerel that makes BG fishing even more rewarding.
I'm going to try some sinking leaders and see if that doesn't get me down a bit further. It would be nice to sink without the hard spot created by shot.



Quote:

Blackhackle wrote:
Good point, you don't want to be hung up all the time. Depends on the water temperature, but around 6-12 inches. Don't have a lot of experience fishing buggers for stillwater bass, but when I did, fished the edge of weed beds and lily pads and along the bank. If there were largemouths around they would usually take near the bottom on the drop before it got there or with a stop and go retrieve I mentioned earlier. In fishing San Juan worms and globugs you should be ticking the bottom and getting hung up occasionally. Not unusual for trout to pick them both out of the gravel even when stationary. Of course fishing that way you will lose a certain number of flies. All three are simple ties though, have you thought of taking up fly tying?

Posted on: 7/24 8:35


Re: Wooly Buggers and San Juan worms

Joined:
2009/5/29 16:32
From Nicholson PA
Posts: 166
Offline
Dont think for one second that tying your own flys is a cheap ordeal you have to look at it being able to create for own flys and catching something on something that you made yourself.

Posted on: 7/31 10:39


Re: Wooly Buggers and San Juan worms

Joined:
2014/3/23 20:12
Posts: 746
Offline
Like nearly all other hobbies, Fly tying is costly. You can spend more or less on materials, but I'm sure it's cheaper to buy flies. That said, I see fly tying as a creative craft. I started tying in the late 80s, following recipes and learning by doing.

Now I find it difficult to not add some variations and creativity to my flies, especially bass and streamer flies. To me, that's a big part of the fun: tie something new (or add a modification you think will work), test it out on fish, modify based on that experience, repeat.

This process has led me to trust a handful of bass patterns and simplify my fly box. It's kinda backwards, but it works for me.

Posted on: 7/31 15:38
_________________
We did not inherited this earth from our parents to do with it what we will. We borrowed it from our children and we must be careful to use it in their interests as well as our own. Anyone who fails to recognise this is either ignorant, a fool, or evil.


Re: Wooly Buggers and San Juan worms

Joined:
2006/9/10 21:53
From Greensburg, PA
Posts: 1887
Offline
Quote:

melvinp wrote:
Dont think for one second that tying your own flys is a cheap ordeal you have to look at it being able to create for own flys and catching something on something that you made yourself.


True, but the longer you do it the cheapER it becomes. As you accumulate material, on a more regular basis, there will be times when you may only need few bucks worth of new material to make 10 times or more dollars worth of flies. Its getting started that hurts. You just have to decide whether you're gonna have more money or time.

Posted on: 8/1 15:56


Re: Wooly Buggers and San Juan worms

Joined:
2007/10/17 10:49
From florida
Posts: 2770
Offline
Tying your own flies and fooling trout adds a "thrill" to a great pastime. That first rise and take of your own hand tied dry fly is "magic". GG

Posted on: 8/2 3:36
_________________
Arguing with idiots is like playing chess with a pigeon... No matter how good you are, the bird is going to crap on the board and strut around like it won anyway.


Re: Wooly Buggers and San Juan worms

Joined:
4/13 11:59
From Easton, PA
Posts: 633
Offline
I feel the contagion. Another member shared some of his favorites with me and when I pull in a 10" BG on one of his it feels special.

Posted on: 8/2 8:56



« 1 (2)



You can view topic.
You cannot start a new topic.
You cannot reply to posts.
You cannot edit your posts.
You cannot delete your posts.
You cannot add new polls.
You cannot vote in polls.
You cannot attach files to posts.
You cannot post without approval.

[Advanced Search]





Site Content
Login
Sponsors
USGS Water Levels <Click Map>
Polls





Copyright 2020 by PaFlyFish.com | Privacy Policy| Provided by Kile Media Group | Design by 7dana.com