Register now on PaFlyFish.com! Login
HOME FORUM BLOG PHOTOS LINKS


Sponsors

Browsing this Thread:   1 Anonymous Users



(1) 2 3 »


Wild Browns

Joined:
2011/5/9 15:37
From Ohio
Posts: 1110
Offline
I've never targeted wild brown trout before, but I have caught 3 of them, all in small freestone streams. One was in a mainly brookie stream, one was in a mainly rainbow stream, and the other I'm not sure because it was the only fish I caught in the creek. I would like to target them but I'm not really sure where to start. Would they be in the lower reaches of brookie streams? Should I still use dries or should I go underneath? The 3 I did catch were subsurface. Are they more spooky than brooks(maybe thats why I'm not catchin them?)? I'll probably be fishin in NW PA so no spring creeks, all freestoners.

Posted on: 2011/9/10 15:11


Re: Wild Browns
Moderator
Joined:
2006/9/9 17:32
From Gettysburg
Posts: 9172
Offline
Streamer,
Broadly speaking, wild browns are the most wildly distributed of the three types of trout here in PA. And yes, it's common to find some in the lower sections of headwater streams that are populated predominately with brookies in their very upper reaches. Wild brookies' stronghold is in the Appalachian range across central PA You'll find wild browns here too but they're also pretty common in valley and meadow streams in places closer to large population centers.
If you're looking for specific waters where you might find wild browns in NW PA your best bet would be to be-friend some anglers from that area and pick their brains. Sometimes a gentle PM to a forum member in the are you seek to fish can produce some good info. Finally, check the PFBC wild trout stream lists - they usually classify a stream by both biomass and species. You'll find many of these Class A streams are listed as having both wild brook and brown trout.

Posted on: 2011/9/10 21:11


Re: Wild Browns

Joined:
2010/1/21 17:06
From Southwest, Pa
Posts: 1069
Offline
love browns but they seem to be taking over everywhere I fish for wilds. More each year... not crying about the size difference though. I fish a stream that gets fingerling browns a lot... so getting away for wild bows and brooks is nice.

Posted on: 2011/9/11 16:29
_________________
Sure, we can assiduously three-quarter our wets down stream, mend, and wait out each fly swing, which to my way of thinking, anyway, relegates to the angler to role of butler, rather than nemesis.

-Art Lee


Re: Wild Browns

Joined:
2008/1/31 17:19
From Pretty much everywhere at some point, Thorndale today.
Posts: 13446
Offline
steve,

Yes, I'm finding more and more browns as the years go on too. Streams I've fished for 15 years and only caught brookies, suddenly turn up a brown here and there. Places you never thought they'd be. Now, I'm not saying there were zero before, but in my view, it's pretty clear their population is on the rise in such streams.

As much as I want to see the brookies thrive, it's probably a good indication that our acid rain abatement efforts are working. Brookies are more acid tolerant than browns. And with acid rain, the effects are greatest in the freestone headwaters, before the stream has a chance to flow over bedrock with a bit of buffering capability. It's no wonder that those sections are the ones that primarily became sanctuaries for brook trout.

Posted on: 2011/9/12 9:35


Re: Wild Browns

Joined:
2009/7/29 10:25
Posts: 1807
Offline
some streams are all brookies near the source, and then you find browns downstream. brookies do better than browns in headwater environments that are colder, more tannic/acidic, and have fewer bugs and baitfish. as water warms and becomes less acidic downstream, there might be more browns. browns can be spooky and it's better to fish AM or dusk for them, brookies are more continuous feeders through the day.

brookies will thrive in really cold water that browns don't grow well in

Posted on: 2011/9/12 11:09

Edited by k-bob on 2011/9/12 11:52:35
Edited by k-bob on 2011/9/12 11:53:33


Re: Wild Browns

Joined:
2006/9/11 13:05
From Lewistown
Posts: 3614
Offline
This reminds of a class a I used to fish often in Lycoming County. Fished it like 15 times and never caugth a brown. Fished another stream with 5footfenwich in the moring and he asked if I've ever caugth any browns in it. I said no. He mentioned his dad catches brown in there all the time (and for those who know his dad, it's a creditable resource). Then I fished it that evening and caugth 3.

Posted on: 2011/9/12 13:23
_________________
><(Mkern{( ‘ >


Re: Wild Browns

Joined:
2006/9/13 10:18
From LV
Posts: 7632
Offline
In most streams with decent fertility there will be both browns and brookies. But there are many brookie streams that hold only brookies for miles because they are infertile. AMD abatement and acid rain abatement are changing the dynamics of some streams that formerly were too acidic for browns now have them. They were probably there in the lower reaches for a long time.

One things that enters the equation is skill level, every year we fish we hpefully become more skilled and therefore start catch more browns in places we seldom caught them.

Posted on: 2011/9/12 22:45
_________________
There is always time to do more to protect wild trout.


Re: Wild Browns

Joined:
2011/5/9 15:37
From Ohio
Posts: 1110
Offline
Thanks for the help. How would I go about fishing for them? Should I fish for them the same as I would brookies? I would usually use dries for brookies, but the browns I have caught were subsurface, so I don't know if it was just coincidence or the browns just don't hit dries as often.

Posted on: 2011/9/13 15:03


Re: Wild Browns

Joined:
2011/5/3 12:22
From South Lebanon Township, PA
Posts: 1940
Offline
Quote:

streamerguy wrote:
How would I go about fishing for them? Should I fish for them the same as I would brookies? I would usually use dries for brookies, but the browns I have caught were subsurface, so I don't know if it was just coincidence or the browns just don't hit dries as often.


I've generally found the same, but I think it's more likely related to where I was fishing than the actual species of trout. Meaning most of the Brookie streams I fish are tiny infertile headwater streams, whereas the Browns were further downstream, or in larger freestoners to start with. If the Browns were in that tiny, headwater environment with little food, I'd expect them to nail any old dry just like a Brookie would. Because they're generally found in more fertile areas with more food, they can be a little more picky.

I'd base your style of fishing on the type of stream you're working and the conditions more so than Brookies vs. Browns. If it's a small headwater stream that happens to have Browns in it, I'd fish it just like it was a Brookie stream...any bushy, attractor dry should work. If it's a larger, more fertile stream I'd try to pay a little more attention to what's happening on the water and develop a plan from there. When all else fails, throw on a Bugger.

Posted on: 2011/9/13 15:30


Re: Wild Browns

Joined:
2008/1/31 17:19
From Pretty much everywhere at some point, Thorndale today.
Posts: 13446
Offline
I've found that most small, infertile, headwater streams do in fact have a few brown trout. And I've almost always caught them on dries, just like fishing for brookies, in fact, WHILE fishing for brookies. The few times I've gone after them, I did so with a dry dropper thinking the browns would be more likely to feed underneath. And well, I don't catch any more, and the vast majority of the ones I do catch still take the dry over the dropper, just like the brookies do. So I always end up going back to the dry on infertile waters.

It's hard to come up with any trends because they're already such a few and far between thing. But I have noticed that I get a larger % of them in high water events, or winter/early spring fishing. So timing may be more important than it is with brookies.

The above only applies for infertile streams, where browns are usually outnumbered by brookies by a fair margin. Where browns dominate, it's usually more fertile, and that's a TOTALLY different world.

Posted on: 2011/9/13 17:53


Re: Wild Browns

Joined:
2011/5/9 15:37
From Ohio
Posts: 1110
Offline
Quote:
Where browns dominate, it's usually more fertile, and that's a TOTALLY different world.


So how should I fish then if browns dominate the stream? Again not limestoners, just small-medium size freestone.

Posted on: 2011/9/13 18:04


Re: Wild Browns

Joined:
2006/9/13 10:18
From LV
Posts: 7632
Offline
You will catch browns on dries, but their m.o. is a bit different than brookies. For instance there are many times during the spring when the water is just warming that you'll catch brookies early in the day and you won't see a brown until the water warms above say 55. Then you'll start catching browns here and there, usually in the best lies, but you'll never catch as many browns as brookies, until evening.
Often times brown will be hitting untill after dark whereas brookies will stop at or soon after dark.
In waters that are primarily brown trout, you may find browns hitting most of the day, but only occasionally when the water is cold in the mornings. Browns also shy away from bright sun so fish the well shaded areas hard and unless you see a brown rising, skip or don't spend a lot of time on sunny sections.

Posted on: 2011/9/13 21:17
_________________
There is always time to do more to protect wild trout.


Re: Wild Browns

Joined:
2011/5/3 12:22
From South Lebanon Township, PA
Posts: 1940
Offline
Quote:

streamerguy wrote:
Quote:
Where browns dominate, it's usually more fertile, and that's a TOTALLY different world.


So how should I fish then if browns dominate the stream? Again not limestoners, just small-medium size freestone.


Here's how my thinking would go. On a small/medium freestoner it's unlikely you'll encounter a major fishable hatch. It's possible, but not near as likely as on a large freestoner or limestone influenced stream. That said conditions would still dictate how I'd fish first and foremost. If flows were low and clear I'd want to fish dries...if I noticed any bug activity I may try to match it, or I'd likely just go with a small tan Caddis or Adams and cast to likely holding spots. If it's Summer I'd consider terrestrials too. I like dries here because they're easier to fish from a distance without spooking fish in low, clear water IMO. They're also more effective in skinny water IMO.

If flows were up to the point where I couldn't fish dries, the first thing I would try is a Bugger. If I knew there were fish there and they weren't chasing the streamer, I'd then consider nymphing. Nymphing is my least favorite way to fly fish, so that's probably why it's a last resort for me. I know guys who nymph very successfully for Browns though, and in colder weather it probably is the most effective way to fish.

Everyone has their own thoughts on how they approach a stream. That's mine for any small/medium freestoner regardless of the species that lives in it. Just mess around and see what works for you. Bottom line they eat more or less the same stuff the Brookies you're used to do. Get out there and throw some bugs at them...they'll eat them.

Posted on: 2011/9/13 22:10


Re: Wild Browns

Joined:
2008/1/31 17:19
From Pretty much everywhere at some point, Thorndale today.
Posts: 13446
Offline
Well, there are MANY different situations, and it's definitely not a one method fits all type thing. Unlike the previous poster, if it's a fertile stream, normal conditions, no fish showing on top, nymphing is almost always my first choice. But I will try anything. Go in with a plan, but be willing to abandon it quickly, use your instincts. It's hard to sum this up, heck, this whole board is largely devoted to figuring these situations out, and all of the most experienced guys argue about it.

One VERY important aspect for even reasonably fertile brown trout waters is timing. Fish that have more food available have the luxury of developing habits. They'll feed only at a certain time of day and spend the rest of day deep in cover. When they do eat, they won't move as far for food, and they'll be more selective. This puts more pressure on the angler. You could say it's tougher fishing, and in a way it is, though the flip side of that is that finding such streams and getting access is often much easier, as they're well known and publicized, access has been insured by the PFBC or other entities, and they even supplied nice parking areas without the hikes.

You've gotta be there when they wanna feed. If you find a surefire way to predict that, please let us all know!!!! It may be timed to hatches or other such events, I've definitely even see fish anticipate a hatch, where they'll come out into feeding lies and jockey for the best lane before it even begins. It could be an event, for instance rain often triggers some feeding activity. Could be time of day, i.e. the low light of evening, or the more comfortable water temps of morning in summer or afternoon in winter. The factors are endless.

As a general trend, the best time is mid-day through March and April, shifting towards evening till after dark in May and June, and then flipping to mornings mid summer. But there are plenty of exceptions to any such rule.

Then after you get the time right, you still gotta match what they're taking. Part of that is pattern. But a perhaps bigger part is figuring out whether they want it dead drifted, or movement, etc. If it's on top, is it in the film or floating high? If underneath, how does it wobble in the current, and at what depth? Are they focusing on it as it rises or falls? And even once you get all that, now you gotta make the proper cast.

Thankfully, fish aren't smart, and you can usually fool a few even if you only get some of those things right. Or perhaps they all aren't keyed in on exactly the same thing, so nomatter what we do we're bound to be right for a few. In any case, a good angler will usually get some, but an angler who figures out the proper keys for that time and place will get more.

Posted on: 2011/9/13 23:20


Re: Wild Browns

Joined:
2006/9/11 13:05
From Lewistown
Posts: 3614
Offline
I would bet that in the moutain streams many anglers mistake small browns for small brookies.
When under 5 inches they are hard to tell apart. I think when a brown gets above 5 inches they seek out areas that are more fertile. ie move down stream or into a different stream.

Posted on: 2011/9/14 11:34
_________________
><(Mkern{( ‘ >



(1) 2 3 »



You can view topic.
You cannot start a new topic.
You cannot reply to posts.
You cannot edit your posts.
You cannot delete your posts.
You cannot add new polls.
You cannot vote in polls.
You cannot attach files to posts.
You cannot post without approval.

[Advanced Search]





Site Content
Login
Username:

Password:

Remember me



Lost Password?

Register now!
Stay Connected

twitterfeed.com facebook instagram RSS Feed

Sponsors
Polls
Do you keep a fishing journal?
Yes 52% (85)
No 47% (78)
_PL_TOTALVOTES
The poll closed at 2014/8/22 12:38
2 Comments





Copyright 2014 by PaFlyFish.com | Privacy Policy| Provided by Kile Media Group | Design by 7dana.com